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Download Anti-Calvinists: The Rise of English Arminianism c. 1590-1640 (Oxford Historical Monographs) eBook

by Nicholas Tyacke

Download Anti-Calvinists: The Rise of English Arminianism c. 1590-1640 (Oxford Historical Monographs) eBook
ISBN:
0198229399
Author:
Nicholas Tyacke
Category:
World
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (March 5, 1987)
Pages:
300 pages
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1817 kb
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1104 kb
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1369 kb
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Rating:
4.8
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259


In his 1968 doctoral dissertation Nicholas Tyacke argued that "the rise of English Arminianism, and the . Over time, the Arminians displaced Calvinists in key positions and effected change on Church and royal policy.

In his 1968 doctoral dissertation Nicholas Tyacke argued that "the rise of English Arminianism, and the consequent outlawing of Calvinism during the 1620s. destabilized the religious status quo" (p. viii). Anti-Calvinists: The Rise of English Arminianism c. 1590-1640 does not advance this thesis much farther. By the late 1620s, Tyacke concludes, "Caroline religious policy," in favor of Arminians, "marked a clear break with both the Jacobean and Elizabethan past" (p. 245).

This is a study of the rise of English Arminianism and the growing religious division in the Church . Almost all English Protestants were members of the established Church. Nicholas Tyacke, author University College London.

This is a study of the rise of English Arminianism and the growing religious division in the Church of England during the decades before the Civil War of the 1640s. The widely accepted view has been that the rise of Puritanism was a major cause of the war; this book argues that it was Arminianism - suspect not only because it sought the overthrow of Calvinism but also because it was embraced by, and imposed by, an increasingly absolutist Charles I - which heightened the religious and political tensions of the period.

Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press. Includes bibliographical references (p. -289) and index. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. No table-of-contents pages found.

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Oxford historical monographs. 0198201842, 0198229399. Puritanism, Arminianism and Counter-Revolution. Library availability.

Anti-Calvinists traces the rise of Arminianism from Elizabethan times, and argues that the subsequent proscription of Calvinism in the 1620s was a major cause of the civil war that broke out in 1642. As Arminianism triumphed under Charles I, it rekindled Puritan opposition to the established church. ISBN13: 9780198229391

This is a study of the rise of English Arminianism and the growing religious division in the Church of England during the decades before the Civil War of the . The author argues that it was Arminianism, t the rise of puritanism, that was a major cause of the war, t only because it was embraced by and imposed by an increasingly absolutist Charles I, which heightened the religious and political tensions of the period.

A Study of the Cambridge Platonists and the Dutch Arminians, Cambridge, 1957. 3. Moreau, Jean-Pierre, Rome ou l'Angleterre ? Les réactions politiques des catholiques anglais au moment du schisme (1529-1553), Paris, Presses Universitaires de France, 1984 ; Lossky, Nicolas, Lancelot Andrewes le prédicateur (1555-1626) aux sources de la théologie mystique de l'Église d'Angleterre, Paris, Éditions du Cerf, 1986 Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Tyacke’s study forms part of the Oxford Historical Monographs series and was first published in cloth in 1987. Tyacke shows that while Calvinism was the dominant religious perspective at the end of Elizabeth’s reign and during that of King James I, under Charles I the Calvinists fell from political power. Following the dissolution of Parliament in 1629 by Charles I, a decade followed in which the Arminians were favored by the king and held power.

c 'Arminianism' in the English sense, however, had a broader application: to questions of church hierarchy, discipline and uniformity; to details of liturgy and ritual; and in the hands.

Arminianism' in the English sense, however, had a broader application: to questions of church hierarchy, discipline and uniformity; to details of liturgy and ritual; and in the hands of the Puritan opponents of Laudianism, to a wider range of perceived or actual ecclesiastical policies, especially those implying any reconciliation with Roman Catholic practice or extension of central government powers over clerics.

Anti-Calvinists traces the rise of Arminianism from Elizabethan times, and argues that the subsequent proscription of Calvinism in the 1620s was a major cause of the civil war that broke out in 1642. As Arminianism triumphed under Charles I, it rekindled Puritan opposition to the established church. The theological dispute between Arminianism and Calvinism--Arminianism promoting the role of the sacraments and the grace they conferred, and Calvinism focusing on the grace of predestination--assumed greater significance as a struggle for control of the church itself. A provocative reinterpretation of the divisions of the Church of England, this work throws new light on the origins of the civil war and the role played by religious rivalry.
  • Hulore
In his 1968 doctoral dissertation Nicholas Tyacke argued that "the rise of English Arminianism, and the consequent outlawing of Calvinism during the 1620s...destabilized the religious status quo" (p. viii). Anti-Calvinists: The Rise of English Arminianism c. 1590-1640 does not advance this thesis much farther. Rather it couples with his suggestion that, "religion was a major contributory cause of the English Civil War" (p. 245). Tyacke charts the anti-Calvinists' progress from disfavor under Elizabeth I and James I to royal preference during Charles I's rule, but not before he establishes that Calvinism dominated the Church for the first two decades of the seventeenth century.

A major contention is that the Church taught Calvinist predestination while suppressing the Arminian refutation. Despite Calvinism's lack of "official" sanctioning in England, enough influential Church leaders embraced the theology to implement it. In particular, Archbishop John Whitgift's Lambeth Articles of 1595, articulated an unequivocal Calvinist theology--saving grace is not granted to all, and election is unconditional--that neither Elizabeth nor James authorized. Yet, Cambridge and Oxford faculty and presses, along with Church clergy, sustained the Articles into the 1620s.

The Arminian position that "election and reprobation are conditional" served as the central doctrine over which clergy and theologians sparred (p. 30). Authorities meted out bishoprics and university chairs based on one's position. Over time, the Arminians displaced Calvinists in key positions and effected change on Church and royal policy. By the late 1620s, Tyacke concludes, "Caroline religious policy," in favor of Arminians, "marked a clear break with both the Jacobean and Elizabethan past" (p. 245).

For the increasing ascendancy of Arminian thought in England throughout the 1620s and 1630s Tyacke extols three men who may not have necessarily called themselves "Arminian." Richard Neile did not advance Arminianism through his writings, but rather as Bishop of Durham (1617-1628) he exercised court influence and conferred clerical patronage to Arminian thinkers. Richard Montagu used Neile's patronage to publish anti-Calvinist works that spurred religious debate in the House of Commons that, taken with other factors, saw Calvinism proscribed and Arminianism "established as the highway to ecclesiastical preferment" (p. 157). Tyacke uses an appendix of William Laud's words as "direct evidence" to prove the controversial Archbishop of Canterbury (1633-1645) held Arminian views. Consequently, Laud's episcopal and political ascent helped carry the rise of Arminianism.

Tyacke's storage of intriguing appended sources is one of the book's strongest contributions. Alongside Laud's Arminian writings is Tyacke's analysis of 184 sermons from Paul's Cross in London, "the most public pulpit in the land," from which he concludes that "monopoly by Calvinists, rather than simply dominance, best describes the situation" in England (p. 249). Regardless of whether one, in the end, agrees with Tyacke, his contention, based mainly on seventeenth-century sermons and publications, that the Church of England was Calvinist without "official" ecclesiastical or royal sanctioning of Calvinist teachings underscores the difficulty of pinpointing seventeenth-century English religious identity. If the Crown did not sanction "Calvinist" Church teachings, and anti-Calvinist propagators did not think themselves "Arminian," how does one properly understand the religious turmoil leading up the Civil War? Anti-Calvinists helps, but does not answer the question.
  • JoldGold
Tyacke rejects the traditional Whig approach to a "high road" to the English reformation. He is also critical of the Marxist historiography of the period which claims the Puritans as a new bourgois in conflict with the established church. (Such interpretations provided by Christopher Hill). Tyacke as many other revisionist sees a general consensus in the English church. There was a general Calvinistic tradition demonstrated by the 39 Articles and the Lambeth Articles. At the ascension of William Laud the Arminians had gained control of some of the powerful positions in the country and were pushing for liturgical reform. They had also succeeded in equivocating theological Calvinism with the slander of Puritanism. This pushed the Calvinist traditions into a counter-attack which resulted in the Revolution. Tyacke's work is in the line of other revisionists of the period such as Patrick Collinson, Peter Lake and Kenneth Fincham. His work has suffered some critical reviews most notably by the "counter-revisionist" Peter White who prefers to see the various theological positions of the period as a "spectrum" with minorities of radical Arminians and radical Puritans. In this method White explains that Arminianism has received an undue amount of the blame for the revolution by revisionist scholars such as Tyacke.
  • Uttegirazu
a good book for me to learn the history