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by Daisetz T. Suzuki

Download Living by Zen eBook
ISBN:
8121510015
Author:
Daisetz T. Suzuki
Category:
World
Language:
English
Publisher:
Munshirm Manoharlal Pub Pvt Ltd; 2 edition (February 4, 2001)
Pages:
187 pages
EPUB book:
1280 kb
FB2 book:
1451 kb
DJVU:
1124 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
640


Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki.

Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. A student of the Zen master Shaku Soen, who addressed the 1893 World's Parliament of Religions held in Chicago, D. T. Suzuki did more to introduce Zen to Westerners than any other representative of that tradition. Shaku Soen sent the young Suzuki to America in 1897 to help Paul Carus translate the Chinese text the Dao De Jing. Suzuki remained in America for about a decade, working at Carus' Open Court Publishing Company outside Chicago.

Zen Buddhism, which sold more than 125,000 as an Anchor paperback after its publication in 1956, includes a basic historical background as well as a thorough overview of the techniques for Zen practice.

Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki (鈴木 大拙 貞太郎 Suzuki Daisetsu Teitarō; he rendered his name "Daisetz" in 1894; 18 October 1870 – 12 July 1966) was a Japanese author of books and essays on Buddhism, Zen (Chan) and Shin that were instrumental in spreadi.

Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki (鈴木 大拙 貞太郎 Suzuki Daisetsu Teitarō; he rendered his name "Daisetz" in 1894; 18 October 1870 – 12 July 1966) was a Japanese author of books and essays on Buddhism, Zen (Chan) and Shin that were instrumental in spreading interest in both Zen and Shin (and Far Eastern philosophy in general) to the West. Suzuki was also a prolific translator of Chinese, Japanese, and Sanskrit literature

Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. Sanseido [press, 1949 - Philosophy - 235 pages. Bibliographic information. Living by Zen (Suzuki: Complete works) Collected series The Complete works of D. Suzuki Complete works, Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. From inside the book. Common terms and phrases. Sanseido [press, 1949. the University of Virginia.

Zen Buddhism and its Influence on Japanese Culture The Zen Doctrine of No-Mind 『日本的霊性』 Nihonteki reisei Tr. by Norman Waddell as Japanese Spirituality, 1972 The Essence of Buddhism 『東洋と西洋』 Tōyō to Seiyō Living by Zen Studies in Zen Zen Buddhism Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist Zen and Japanese Buddhism Zen and Japanese Culture (Revision o. Suzuki's admirers and critics all agree that his pre-war writings, steeped in Chinese and Japanese tradition, carried a strong psychological emphasis on Zen as an experience, supported by Zen expression and Zen consciousness.

Suzuki, Daisetz Teitaro. Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015. author: Suzuki, Daisetz Teitaro d. ate. te: 0000-00-00 d. citation: 1949 d. dentifier. origpath: 02 d. copyno: 1 d.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: G. Erich Fromm; Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki.

If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. Budismo zen y psicoanalisis. Download (PDF). Читать. Manual of Zen Buddhism.

One of the most important works on Zen Buddhism  . Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki (鈴木 大拙 貞太郎 Suzuki Daisetsu Teitarō; rendered "Daisetz" after 1893) was Professor of Buddhist philosophies at Ōtani University. As a translator and writer on Buddhism and Eastern philosophy, he greatly helped to popularize Japanese Zen in the West.

Daisetz T. Suzuki (1870-1966) was Japan's foremost authority on Zen Buddhism and the author of more than one hundred books on the subject

Daisetz T. Suzuki (1870-1966) was Japan's foremost authority on Zen Buddhism and the author of more than one hundred books on the subject. Richard M. Jaffe is associate professor of religious studies at Duke University.

Suzuki, Daisetz Teitaro (dĪˈsĕts tātäˈrō sōzōˈkē), 1870–1966 . Suzuki and his wife dedicated themselves to spreading an understanding of Mahayana Buddhism.

Suzuki, Daisetz Teitaro (dĪˈsĕts tātäˈrō sōzōˈkē), 1870–1966, Japanese Buddhist scholar, educated at Tokyo University who was a Japanese author of books and essays on Buddhism, Zen and Shin that were instrumental in spreading interest in both Zen and Shin (and Far Eastern philosophy in general) to the West. Besides living in the United States, Suzuki traveled through Europe before taking up a professorship back in Japan. In his day, Suzuki was a leading authority on Buddhism and is known for his introduction of Zen Buddhism to the West.

The book contains a number of essays which D.T. Suzuki wrote from time to time concerning the specificity and uniqueness of Zen Buddhism, or the school of Buddhism that values meditative practice more than philosophical thinking. The book may be considered as an Introduction to Zen on account of the concern shown for such themes which a beginner needs to know. In the very first essay is explained as to what Zen way of life denotes. Many find it difficult to comprehend the language of Zen. That is the author has made an attempt at clarifying the Zen idea of a koan, which is a paradoxical question verging almost on absurdity. It is believed that enlightenment or satori comes to be once a koan is understood. The book offers a rich banquet to those who want to taste the flavour of the feast of Zen.
  • RUL
this is only a small book and so i am unable to give it more that three stars; it is however superb. i just love Suzuki Roshi's books. they are though quite inaccessible to someone without a degree of experience in zen or philosophy.

dharma nature features quite prominantly in his writing and to my mind he had a clear perception of dharma nature, at least logically he certainly did. he knew how to speak of seeing nature. the non dual perception of reality... just so. as Wei Lang (Hui Neng) said: "see your nature and become a buddha".

however... as it is written in the Wu Men Kuan (Mummon kan): "it is not buddha, it is not mind, it is not emptiness" Master Nanquan (Nansen). from this we know that we must not attach to nature, nor become entranced by dharma nature, which is emptiness or suchness.

we are told by the Zen Patriarch Bodhidharma: "enlightenment is nought to be attained"

we are told in the Vajracheddika (Diamond Sutra):
"enlightenment is nothing to attain nor to be attained"

we are told in the greater prajnaparamita: "take your stand in nothing at all" this is the non abiding mind.

some have reified perception. perception is the string on which are pearled emptiness/nature/suchness and every experience and realization we have ever consciously had... so some emphasise the mala of perception.

some have reified the natural state. the natural state is that in which we permanently find ourselves, naturally aware, naturally asleep and unaware. naturally complete. no effort needed. just breathe. just remember to live thats all! some have said 'just be'. this is your natural state.

in the end one can say with the buddha "this day i and all beings have become enlightened", that is because there is nothing at all to realize nor to be realized; nor to attain. (as is explained in the texts).

nothing "at all". not nothing, not anything to realize.

youve always had it. youve always being enlightened. this is what Master Bankei was trying to tell people, that their mind just as it is, is the buddha mind.

since it is nothing at all, it is nothing at all to realize, nor anything to attain, nor do nor any kind of special behaviour or state to achieve. it is quite simply nothing at all. i found it hard to non abide in the natural state (Rigpa). however when you abide in nothing at all, there is no abiding in anthing at all and yet abiding with ease.

nothing "at all" has no opposite. it is not nothing, nor everything nor is it anything and is the only thing i can think of that has no dual opposite.

this is like the Christian Via Negativa, the Aphophatic understanding that anything we can say about God falls short of the mark, some have even taken this as far as saying that God is not anything at all. Meister Ekhart said that God is absolute nothingness. i would take it further than this and say that the ultimate is not even nothing, nor nothingness; rather that the ultimate is nothing ''at all''. in other words, beyond all expression. And yet immanently and transcendently expressed as 'one'. the oneness of all things.

that truth is ugly, truth is beautiful, truth is neutral, truth is this computer, truth is a sunset, truth is a disaster, truth is 0, 1, 2, 3, etc etc. this is immanent and transcendent... the nature of things is one. however going beyond nature one finds "nothing at all". not darkness, not light, not transcendent not immanent, beyond all opposites; not enlightened, not deluded, not even 'is'.

the state free from buddha nature is icchantika, this is attained when one realizes nothing at all, however nothing at all is still a position, one needs to let go of all positions. when st John of the cross spoke of God as nothing ,and Eckhart spoke of God as 'absolute nothingness' they were still leaning on human understanding. we need to let go of all understanding. Thomas Aquinas spoke of God as ''Tamquam ignotum'' God as the unknown. its the same for enlightenment. one lets go of all understanding and ''does not know''. Patriarch Chin, quoted in the Shinji Shobogenzo says "in the end you do not know". Shao Shu (Joshu said) "you need to let go of nothing". so i conclude that 'it' is not even nothing at all. nor is God.

hope this is helpful.

best wishes, Tom. x

(it is my clear understanding that the universal spiritual path leads to a joining, a unity of Christianity and Buddhism as regards nature and as regards going beyond nature into the apophatic).
  • Went Tyu
When I read this book, the effect was like a bolt of lightening! I was studying Western Philosophy at the time and with all the questions in my mind, this book was like a key that unlocked them! D.T. Suzuki, perhaps the foremost interpreter of Zen Buddhism to the West, has written a book that illuminates Zen in such a clear way, that the effect is like a lamp shining away the darkness of ignorance. I would encourage all people who are looking for a very clearly written, concise introduction to Zen Buddhism to look no further. I would say that "Living by Zen" can even go one step further and "show" what it is like to live by Zen. May all beings be happy and free!