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Download The Muslim Discovery of Europe eBook

by Bernard Lewis Ph.D.

Download The Muslim Discovery of Europe eBook
ISBN:
0393321657
Author:
Bernard Lewis Ph.D.
Category:
World
Language:
English
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company (October 17, 2001)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1688 kb
FB2 book:
1640 kb
DJVU:
1223 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
335


Bernard Lewis is one of America's foremost scholars on the history of the Middle East. The Muslim Discovery of Europe certainly demonstrates this, as he shows the political, social and economic mis-cues between Europe and the Near East over the last 1000 years.

Bernard Lewis is one of America's foremost scholars on the history of the Middle East. For much of that time, the rulers of the Middle East were not terribly interested in Europe (this may be suprising to Europeans), as socially and economically it was a backwater: the caliphs tended to look east.

Bernard Lewis was born in London, England on May 31, 1916 In 1938, he was named an assistant lecturer at the University of London, where he received a P.

Bernard Lewis was born in London, England on May 31, 1916. He graduated with honors in history from the School of Oriental Studies at the University of London in 1936 with special reference to the Middle East. In 1938, he was named an assistant lecturer at the University of London, where he received a P. In 1940, he was drafted into the British armed forces and assigned to the Army tank corps. He was soon transferred to intelligence.

by Bernard Lewis, P. Books related to The Muslim Discovery of Europe.

Almost all of them are intriguing. Lewis also covers diplomatic contact between Islamic and European countries

Almost all of them are intriguing. Lewis also covers diplomatic contact between Islamic and European countries. The nation-to-nation contact parts of the book are the best because he explains what Europe learned from Islamic civilization and vice versa. The book ranges from Muslims' early contact with Europe to the early 19th century.

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Bernard Lewis was born to middle-class Jewish parents, Harry Lewis and the . In his 1982 work Muslim Discovery of Europe, Lewis argues

Bernard Lewis was born to middle-class Jewish parents, Harry Lewis and the . Lewis argued that the Middle East is currently backward and its decline was a largely self-inflicted condition resulting from both culture and religion, as opposed to the post-colonialist view which posits the problems of the region as economic and political maldevelopment mainly due to the 19th-century European colonization. In his 1982 work Muslim Discovery of Europe, Lewis argues

One feature of European civilization that stands out as unique is curiosity.

Электронная книга "The Muslim Discovery of Europe", Bernard Lewis. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Muslim Discovery of Europe" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The eleventh-century Muslim world was a great civilization while Europe lay slumbering in the Dark Ages. Slowly, inevitably, Europe and Islam came together, through trade and war, crusade and diplomacy. The ebb and flow between these two worlds for seven hundred years, illuminated here by a brilliant historian, is one of the great sagas of world history. Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben. The muslim discovery of europe. Nutzerbericht - Kirkus.

"Full of rare and exact information…A distinguished work." ―New York Review of Books

The eleventh-century Muslim world was a great civilization while Europe lay slumbering in the Dark Ages. Slowly, inevitably, Europe and Islam came together, through trade and war, crusade and diplomacy. The ebb and flow between these two worlds for seven hundred years, illuminated here by a brilliant historian, is one of the great sagas of world history.

30 black and white illustrations
  • RED
Bernard Lewis provides detailed information that the reader wants. The reader knows that it's there, waiting to be discovered. However, the print is so small that it discourages the reader from moving forward. One should not have to struggle so hard to access the wealth of knowledge conveyed.
  • grand star
The repetitious recounting of the Muslin perspective of Europe can become tedious, but it is important to understand the perspective of superiority inherent in the Muslim view.
  • Samowar
This is not an easy read, but Professor Bernard Lewis is a skilled writer. The book is divided into various disciplines; culture, science, language, government, etc., and spans approximately 1000 years of contact between the Muslim east (Persia, Ottoman Turkey, Arabia, Mughal India) and the European west.
It is not written chronologically, as other reviewers have commented, but this didn't bother me, personally. Prof. Lewis gives real insight into a variety of Islamic views of the west. I could not ignore that for the majority of the 1000 years covered, there was just as much intolerance and arrogance exhibited by Muslims as there was by Westerners. I was hoping to find a few more positive sketches of the historical contact between east and west.
Prof. Lewis writes with skill and an authoriatative voice, and I saw no reason to believe that his conclusions were false or misleading. Many of the numerous sources he uses are amazing as well. A great book that offers a fresh view of Western history and Westerners, as well as Muslim history. It is also difficult to not apply what is read here to the current world situation. A great book.
  • Vutaur
Well written
  • Twentyfirstfinger
I had trouble maintaining my concentration and interest with this book. Despite the fact that the author has broken the book up into "theme" chapters, such as "Muslim Scholarship About The West," "Government And Justice," "Science And Technology," etc., the book suffers from a lack of focus. Mr. Lewis keeps jumping back and forth, within the space of a few sentences, in both time (from about 700-1900 A.D.) and space (from Morocco across to Iran). He seems to have just gathered together a lot of material and pretty much jumbled it together. It doesn't really come together, and I found the structure disconcerting and even annoying. Another problem is that the author includes too many excerpts from first person accounts, which results in whatever narrative flow the book does have being disrupted even further. There is too much repetition- the author makes the same points over and over and includes four quotations when one or two would suffice. The book merits three stars because if you have the patience to sift through all of the material, you will be rewarded with some nuggets. For example, in the section dealing with economics, Mr. Lewis mentions that coffee and sugar both originated, commercially speaking, in Muslim countries, but these same countries wound up importing both items (because of lower prices) from the Central American and Caribbean colonies of Western European countries; in the section on religion, the author explains that Muslims had a difficult time understanding the concept of a Pope, especially that a man could forgive sins, as in Islam there is no such hierarchy as exists in the Catholic Church, and only God can forgive sins; in the chapter entitled "Social And Personal" the author quotes a disgusted Muslim regarding European personal hygiene: "You shall see none more filthy than they...They do not cleanse or bathe themselves more than once or twice a year, and then in cold water, and they do not wash their garments from the time they put them on until they fall to pieces. They shave their beards, and after shaving they sprout only a revolting stubble." Some of the excerpts are enlightening, some funny, and some sad (because they demonstrate the prejudice, intolerance, and lack of understanding that runs in both directions- and certainly gives us reason to ponder what the future holds in store). Again, though, there is just too much data here which is put together in a slapdash fashion. Mr. Lewis had a basic idea which could have resulted in an excellent book. Too bad the end result didn't fulfill the original promise.
  • Gavinranadar
Book can be a bit dryt but the topic is fascinating, Gives the reader some insight into why some things in the middle east are the way that they are.
  • Irostamore
Very informative, enjoyable read.
Bernard Lewis is one of America's foremost scholars on the history of the Middle East. _The Muslim Discovery of Europe_ certainly demonstrates this, as he shows the political, social and economic mis-cues between Europe and the Near East over the last 1000 years. For much of that time, the rulers of the Middle East were not terribly interested in Europe (this may be suprising to Europeans), as socially and economically it was a backwater: the caliphs tended to look east. This, of course, was eventnually their undoing.

Lewis discusses at length this lack of interest in Europe by the wealthy and powerful in the MIddle East - in spite of the minor nusiance of the Crusades, the Abbysids, Il Khanids (Mongols) and later the Ottomans were primarily concerned with the internal doctrnal disputes and the control of trade routes to India and China. That Europe knew little of the Islamic world beyond their contributions in medicine, mathematics and astronomy (via Muslim Spain) is less suprising. The real "discovery" begins only after Sulieyman the Lawgiver ("the Magnificent" in the West) reached the gates of Vienna - when Britain, Portugal and the Italian city-states began to flex their muscles, exerting control over sea-routes in the Mediterranean and the Arabian Gulf.

Yet still the prejustices and misunderstandings persisted between East and West - I was struck by how little things have changed in our understanding of one another's cultures and values. Lewis' resitation is good, and he certainly was prescient in his discussion of the broader issues these parts of the world face. However, for my money, this same topic is covered much more clearly and in a more accessable manner in Destiny Disrupted: A History of the World through Islamic Eyes. If you must choose between one or the other, I recommend Ansary.