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Download Storey's Guide to Raising Miniature Livestock: Goats, Sheep, Donkeys, Pigs, Horses, Cattle, Llamas eBook

by Sue Weaver

Download Storey's Guide to Raising Miniature Livestock: Goats, Sheep, Donkeys, Pigs, Horses, Cattle, Llamas eBook
ISBN:
1603424814
Author:
Sue Weaver
Category:
Crafts & Hobbies
Language:
English
Publisher:
Storey Publishing, LLC; First Edition edition (January 6, 2010)
Pages:
453 pages
EPUB book:
1926 kb
FB2 book:
1334 kb
DJVU:
1440 kb
Other formats
txt mbr lit docx
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
512


General information it's Okay. I picked up Raising Miniature Livestock because I can't decide what kind of animals to raise and minis have a lot going for them! Lo and behold, there are so many bits of wisdom here for raising all types of livestock-large and small-everyone will benefit from this book. Raising Minis is a real treasure. Thanks, Sue, for another enjoyable and immensely helpful guide.

Building Chicken Coops: Storey Country Wisdom Bulletin A-224. You could raise Miniature Highland cattle in South Texas and Miniature Zebus in northern Minnesota - but why would you want to? For the animals’ sake, choose something adapted for the weather where you live. You will need to do your homework to determine what your options are.

With expert advice on choosing a breed that suits your needs, Sue Weaver shows you how to house, feed, and care for miniature goats, sheep, donkeys, pigs, horses, cattle, and llamas. You’ll be inspired by profiles of successful breeders as you learn everything you need to know to keep your miniature livestock healthy and productive. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

horses, donkeys, mules, pigs, cattle, sheep, goats, and llamas. a large farm, raising miniature livestock can be a fun and profitable experience. Storey’s Guide to Raising. Storey Publishing, LLC.

Whatever your interest in minis, this reliable resource guides you through choosing, caring for, training, and breeding mini horses, donkeys, mules, pigs, cattle, sheep, goats, and llamas. With expert advice on choosing a breed that suits your needs, Sue Weaver shows you how to house, feed, and care for miniature goats, sheep, donkeys, pigs, horses, cattle, and llamas. Book Format.

A new Storey Guide book is divided into two sections, "Raising Miniature Livestock" and "The Species. The first section covers what you need to know before you begin, deciding on a species, getting started, selecting stock, livestock guardians, facilities and fences, feeding, health, identification, transportation, breeding, dairy stock, and business management. The Species section covers virtually every miniature animal you might choose to raise, including miniature cattle, horses, donkeys, mules, goats, llamas, pigs, and sheep.

Tiny horses, donkeys, cattle, and goats can be trained to pull wagons, and .

Tiny horses, donkeys, cattle, and goats can be trained to pull wagons, and miniature animals work as therapy animals in schools, nursing homes, and hospitals. That need is met with "Storey's Guide to Raising Miniature Livestock" by Sue Weaver. This is the go-to-guide that takes the mystery out of minis. Breeding, feeding, housing, diet, nutrition, exercise, as well as disease prevention and treatment - new and experienced farmers will find everything they need to keep minis healthy and productive.

Section Two covers each of the livestock included (Mini Cattle, Horses, Donkeys, Mules, Goats, Llamas, and Sheep)

Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Section Two covers each of the livestock included (Mini Cattle, Horses, Donkeys, Mules, Goats, Llamas, and Sheep). This includes a section of photographs (though all the pictures are together, not spread out through the book). I found most of the information to be reliable and fair. Sue Weaver loves most animals (especially donkeys) and you can tell when reading her work.

Goats, Sheep, Donkeys, Pigs, Horses, Cattle, Llamas. Sue Weaver has written hundreds of magazine articles and many books about livestock, horses, and chickens, including The Backyard Cow, The Backyard Goat, The Backyar. ee Bio. Related Stories. Little Goats for City Living. Give a Goat a Guinness? Treating Livestock with Beer. More Farm Animals, Horses & Pets Stories.

Miniature livestock are the answer Many people want to raise cows, sheep, goats and other livestock, but .

Miniature livestock are the answer. Every bit as useful and adorable as their bigger counterparts, mini livestock. Many people want to raise cows, sheep, goats and other livestock, but they don’t have the space or the time to maintain a large animal farm. Miniature livestock are the answer. Tiny horses, donkeys, cattle, and goats can be trained to pull wagons, and miniature animals work as therapy animals in schools, nursing homes, and hospitals

Whether you want to the make most of a small plot of land or add diversity to a large farm, raising miniature livestock can be a fun and profitable experience. With expert advice on choosing a breed that suits your needs, Sue Weaver shows you how to house, feed, and care for miniature goats, sheep, donkeys, pigs, horses, cattle, and llamas. You’ll be inspired by profiles of successful breeders as you learn everything you need to know to keep your miniature livestock healthy and productive.

  • Mohn
I have several of Sue Weaver's books, and I have grown to trust her on most subjects pertaining to animal care. This is another example of her work, which I have always found to be clearly and simply written, factual, and nicely toned (there are few things more offensive than reading a 'how to' guide in which the author clearly feels his audience is beneath him; Ms. Weaver, as always, comes across in a friendly and instructive manner without being condescending)

This book is split into two sections: Raising Miniature Livestock and The Species. Each section is then divided into chapters. The first second is, as it is aptly titled, about raising minis. The chapters in the first section are as follows:

1 Before You Begin (basically about whether you are really ready and able to have livestock, mini or otherwise)

2 Which Species? (the title is self-evident, but, basically, the chapter compares the different miniatures available, and helps you choose which you are interested in learning more about--Section 2 of the book covers the individual species more throughly)

3 Getting Started: Education, Vets, and Where to Buy (information everyone needs to consider in preperation for any animal)

4 Selecting Miniature Livestock (This chapter helps you learn what to look for as far as healthy minis go. It also delves into the genetic issue of Dwarfism.)

5 Livestock Guardians

6 Facilities and Fences (goes over what kind of housing your livestock will need)

7 Feeding ( I did not realize before I picked up this book that miniature goats, sheep, and the rest of them have different food needs than their full-sized cousins (other than the obvious difference in porportion). But Ms. Weaver explains the different needs that Minis have)

8 Health (a very, very basic primer on healthcare, things you must know, such as worming and taking care of wounds)

9 Identification (about permanent/temporary tagging)

10 Transportation (helps you get your stock from point A to B with minimal stress and danger to all concerned)

11 Breeding (basically, how to get baby minis and a little on how to care for baby)

12 Got Milk? (fairly self-evident, but a start on dairying your minis...but you'll need more than this book if you really want to get started in that)

13 The Business End (How to market your minis so they at least pay their way)

Section Two covers each of the livestock included (Mini Cattle, Horses, Donkeys, Mules, Goats, Llamas, and Sheep). This includes a section of photographs (though all the pictures are together, not spread out through the book)

I found most of the information to be reliable and fair. Sue Weaver loves most animals (especially donkeys) and you can tell when reading her work.

There is one little issue, though I do not hold this againist Ms. Weaver, as she is not the photographer, is that there is a photo of a goat in this book that is also in Storey's Guide to Livestock Breeds, and which the books each classify differently. I don't know how this came about, but since it is not the author's fault, one can hardly hold her accountable.

All in all, I suggest this book if you are new to the miniature world. Some of the information is something that someone with a little experience wouldn't need, but it is great for beginners,and even the experienced can learn something useful!
  • Celen
For Me the book was a waste of time and money. For others it could be just what they wanted. The book was very general covering many farm animals but gives no more information that a basic website would about an animal. Was expecting something more specialized about miniatures.
Would suggest some books like raising beef cattle, dairy cattle, meat goats etc. which are Storey's Guide to. These will give more specifics.
General information it's Okay.
  • Original
I am a huge Sue Weaver fan. She is a knowledgeable and articulate writer. She has a great sense of humor and one that does not overwhelm the text. I've read all of her books. I highly recommend each and every one. Up until now, the Donkey book was my favorite. I picked up Raising Miniature Livestock because I can't decide what kind of animals to raise and minis have a lot going for them! Lo and behold, there are so many bits of wisdom here for raising all types of livestock--large and small--everyone will benefit from this book. Raising Minis is a real treasure. Thanks, Sue, for another enjoyable and immensely helpful guide. Keep up the great writing!
  • Zeueli
It wasa informative on a miniature subject with lots of specific information./ I knew a woman briefly who was secretary of the Miniature Llamas Association. This book tellswhat we might not want to hear if we are not alrady miniature owners... They really aren't cuddly and they really suffer from the Texas heat. Maybe we should stick with cuddly heat proof goats.
  • Gugrel
What a great and informative book. Love reading it about the various miniature animals. Looking l get donkeys and now also adding goats to our farm
  • Tinavio
I wanted to learn about raising small livestock that I could handle on my own (I'm old). Lots of dependable information. Storey's are always good sources for beginners.

Now if I can just come up with the $1200 for a mini jersey heifer. My neighbor has offered her acre of pasture in exchange for milk. And have two customers looking for raw milk.

Checking soon with our local AG Office for detailed info.
  • Grosho
I have many books related to animals and animal care. This is my primary interest and recently I have acquired several miniature species. Their care and welfare as well as their behavior is different than standard size animals and this book is very helpful in that respect. I am referring back to it constantly as its an excellent reference book.
Very. very good overview of miniature barnyard animals