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Download Tulipmania: Money, Honor, and Knowledge in the Dutch Golden Age eBook

by Anne Goldgar

Download Tulipmania: Money, Honor, and Knowledge in the Dutch Golden Age eBook
ISBN:
0226301265
Author:
Anne Goldgar
Category:
Gardening & Landscape Design
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press; Reprint edition (September 15, 2008)
Pages:
446 pages
EPUB book:
1813 kb
FB2 book:
1967 kb
DJVU:
1953 kb
Other formats
rtf azw mbr lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
593


As Anne Goldgar reveals in Tulipmania, not one of these stories is true. Anne Goldgar’s scholarly sleuthing gives a whole new look to the 1630s tulipmania in the Netherlands.

As Anne Goldgar reveals in Tulipmania, not one of these stories is true. The crash in prices undermined not the economy, but people’s confidence in honor and good judgment.

The Dutch Golden Age during the Early Modern period in Europe.

Anne Goldgar’s scholarly sleuthing gives a whole new look to the 1630s tulipmania in the Netherlands. The crash in prices undermined not the economy, but people's confidence in honor and good judgment. Delightfully written, Tulipmania turns the exaggerations of a media event into an exploration of early modern values and anxieties. Natalie Zemon Davis). The last chapter and the epilogue were the most interesting parts of the book to me.

Anne Goldcar, Tulipmania. Money, Honor and Knowledge in the Dutch Golden Age. Wantje Fritschy. Published: 15 December 2008. in Tijdschrift voor Sociale en Economische Geschiedenis/ The Low Countries Journal of Social and Economic History. Tijdschrift voor Sociale en Economische Geschiedenis/ The Low Countries Journal of Social and Economic History, Volume 5; doi:10.

Davids, CA 2009, '' Historian, vol. 71, no. 2, pp. 412-413. In: Historian, Vol. 2, 2009, p. T1 -. AU - Davids, .

An excerpt from Tulipmania: Money, Honor, and Knowledge in the .

An excerpt from Tulipmania: Money, Honor, and Knowledge in the Dutch Golden Age by Anne Goldgar.

Request PDF On Feb 1, 2008, joost jonker and others published Tulipmania: money, honor, and knowledge in. .How we measure 'reads'.

How we measure 'reads'. In the 1630s the Netherlands was gripped by tulipmania: a speculative fever unprecedented in scale and, as popular history would have it, folly. We all know the outline of the story-how otherwise sensible merchants, nobles, and artisans spent all they had (and much that they didn’t) on tulip bulbs.

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As Anne Goldgar reveals inTulipmania, not one of these stories is true. Goldgar tells us at the start of her excellent debunking book: ‘Most of what we have heard of is not true.

In the 1630s the Netherlands was gripped by tulipmania: a speculative fever unprecedented in scale and, as popular history would have it, folly. We all know the outline of the story—how otherwise sensible merchants, nobles, and artisans spent all they had (and much that they didn’t) on tulip bulbs. We have heard how these bulbs changed hands hundreds of times in a single day, and how some bulbs, sold and resold for thousands of guilders, never even existed. Tulipmania is seen as an example of the gullibility of crowds and the dangers of financial speculation.             But it wasn’t like that. As Anne Goldgar reveals in Tulipmania, not one of these stories is true. Making use of extensive archival research, she lays waste to the legends, revealing that while the 1630s did see a speculative bubble in tulip prices, neither the height of the bubble nor its bursting were anywhere near as dramatic as we tend to think. By clearing away the accumulated myths, Goldgar is able to show us instead the far more interesting reality: the ways in which tulipmania reflected deep anxieties about the transformation of Dutch society in the Golden Age.            “Goldgar tells us at the start of her excellent debunking book: ‘Most of what we have heard of [tulipmania] is not true.’. . . She tells a new story.”—Simon Kuper, Financial Times
  • Kakashkaliandiia
This is, essentially, an extended argument that the tulip bubble was overblown; and more of a rhetorical device than an actual crisis. The argument is persuasive, but also could have used a stronger editorial hand: this is, itself, a long pamphlet, not a book. Still, an interesting read in a time of new bubbles (and moral judgements).
  • Voodoolkree
True, it has a lot of probably unnecessary details but i'm learning a lot about Dutch history/language/culture from these details. Whenever the author tries to philosophize, i kind of cringe and skip it - it's pretty arbitrary. You either write a history/fact book or an opinion book, ideally. But it's still good.
  • Not-the-Same
If you're in a hurry, this book can be tedious. The few paragraphs in wikipedia on tulipmania pretty much sum up the whole argument of the book. However, if you just want to learn more about the life and people, especially the merchant class in early and mid 17th century Netherlands, this could be a fascinating read.
  • Minnai
This book reads like a college text you had to read for an exam. An interesting topic for me as I was traveling to Holland. If it were written by my favorite author of nonfiction. John McPhee, it would have been a winner. I skimmed through it and couldn't wait until I was finished. Lots of information if you are truly interested in the 17th century tulip trade and not a dilettante like me. The mania for bulbs is often likened to our stock market crashes and internet crazes. The epilogue called "Cabbage Fever " is most interesting so I will give this tome 3 stars.
  • Wyameluna
Many people talk about bubbles. Few will spend time to look into details. This book alone digs in depth.
  • Iraraeal
This is an exercise in contrarian history. The author takes a known historical event, claims that they have unique access to sources that tell the "real" truth and that every previous writer was incompetent liar. For what its worth, drawing drastic new conclusions about historical events in books like this is usually a sign of an author full of themselves.

The book is poorly argued and poorly organized. It focuses too much on the "new sources" approach and too little on making the case against the previous historical work on the topic.There is also way too much on the mechanics of markets and the process of sales while at the same time the economic analysis of the market as a whole is rather thin in spots. The often selective nature of her economic analysis tends to make me question the books conclusions.

Ironically, the same sort of book could be written to explain that the 2008 financial crisis wasn't a meaningful event. If one were to do micro-analysis of mortgage transactions and derivatives trading at the time of the crisis while neglecting the macro-level market and economy, it would probably be possible to conclude the same sorts of things the author here concludes about the Tulip market.
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  • Roram
After reading Tulipmania, I feel that the book could have been better than it was. Goldgar claims that she used firsthand sources that no one else has used to study the topic of Tulipmania before, allowing her to draw conclusions that no one has previously done. Essentially, Goldgar questions the traditional interpretation throughout history of Tulipmania, particularly the effect that the crisis actually had on Dutch society.

Even though these new sources shed new light on the topic, I felt that the book could have been delivered in a much better way. Goldgar quickly becomes bogged down with the minutia of the tulip trade. She did talk about overall trends; however, I think the book would have been much more interesting if she didn't spend as much time writing about individual transactions or individual meetings between buyers and sellers. These are necessary to establish the validity of the argument, but I think that the book would be more enjoyable with a few less of these examples.

The book also could have been improved with some overall statistics about Dutch society at the time. For example, (without giving too much away) claims about the economic conditions in the Netherlands during the early 17th century could have been backed up with more than just assertions from the author. In addition, the book does not spend a lot of time on some key issues, particularly, why the prices suddenly collapsed. This may have been out of the scope of the book, and the author does state that the issue is extremely complex and has no easy answer. But I think it would have added to the book to spend a bit more time discussing a few of the possible reasons.

This is not to say that the book had no positives. Simply by looking at new primary sources, the author has done a great service to anyone interested in Tulipmania, the Netherlands, or early modern Europe. Goldgar uses actual records from the transactions that took place at the time, rather than the pamphlets written by third parties at the time of and shortly after the crash in tulip prices. The author put a lot of research into the book, using those records to come up with an extensive list of buyers and sellers within the tulip trade. By doing this, she develops an accurate image of who was involved in the tulip trade and how far reaching the trade was into society.

Another strong point of the book was the description of Early Modern Dutch society. An entire chapter is dedicated to art in Holland at the time and how that relates to tulips and other collectable items in Dutch society. The book also draws a number of interesting conclusions about how business was conducted in Dutch society. As the title suggests, money, honor, and knowledge were all very important themes in the Netherlands.

The last chapter and the epilogue were the most interesting parts of the book to me. It is here that the author begins to use the enormous amounts of detail to draw some conclusions about Tulipmania. She explains why Tulipmania was thought to be of such great economic performance, why she feels it was not, and why she feels that the effects of the event were distorted. The epilogue ties everything together with a discussion on values and knowledge within a society.

I recommend this book if you are interested in Tulipmania and/or the Netherlands during the early seventeenth century. However, be prepared to slog through minute details to get to the good stuff.