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Download Harvest: An Adventure into the Heart of America8217;s Family Farms eBook

by Richard Horan

Download Harvest: An Adventure into the Heart of America8217;s Family Farms eBook
ISBN:
0062090313
Author:
Richard Horan
Category:
Gardening & Landscape Design
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harper Perennial; Original edition (September 25, 2012)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1444 kb
FB2 book:
1308 kb
DJVU:
1520 kb
Other formats
lrf doc doc docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
114


Richard Horan has brought us a welcome view of America to defy the prevailing political and financial nastiness

Richard Horan has brought us a welcome view of America to defy the prevailing political and financial nastiness. This is a timely and important book. Ted Morgan, author of Wilderness at Dawn. A lively visit with the dauntless men and women who operate America’s family farms and help provide our miraculous annual bounty. Richard Horan writes with energy and passion. Hannah Nordhaus, author of The Beekeeper’s Lament. Horan’s new book evocatively describes the peril and promise of family farms in America. I loved joining him on this journey, and so will you. -.

A lively visit with the dauntless men and women who operate America’s family farms and help provide our miraculous annual bounty.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Barron, author of The Great Tree of Avalon.

Novelist and nature writer Richard Horan embarked on an adventure across America to reveal that farming is still the vibrant beating heart of our nation.

Richard Horan has brought us a welcome view of America to defy the prevailing political and financial nastiness

Richard Horan has brought us a welcome view of America to defy the prevailing political and financial nastiness.

Jeff Glor talks to Richard Horan about "Harvest: An Adventure into the Heart of. .

Jeff Glor talks to Richard Horan about "Harvest: An Adventure into the Heart of America's Family Farms. Richard Horan: I was unemployed and still am. Plus, all of my old heroes were dead (the great writers and boxers and agitators of idolized in my youth). It is a historical document, a transcription, about the folks in the lower Ninth Ward and what they've suffered and how they've managed to overcome incredible obstacles to rebuild their lives after the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina.

Total Holds: 0. Total Check Outs: 4Including Renewals. Harvest : an adventure into the heart of America's family farms.

Offers a travelogue of the author's trip to family-owned farms across America to help farmers harvest over a dozen food crops, including wheat, cranberries, and Hopi blue corn, and his efforts to form connections with them and the land. If you really want to start a food fight leading to extraordinary vitriole, just mention you are for (or against) organic food, raw milk, GMO, veganism, or whatever.

Richard Horan sure can write! Many of us already know this stuff from listening to NPR in Walmart parking lots

Richard Horan sure can write! Many of us already know this stuff from listening to NPR in Walmart parking lots. Mr. Horan pokes fun at some of the characters he meets along the way. Yes, he was probably just describing them as he saw them and aiming for some yuks, but as those people provide the heart of the book’s content, instead of hilarity in schadenfreude, I felt uncomfortable.

Harvest An Adventure Into The Heart Of Americas Family Farms. Harvest An Adventure Into The Heart Of Americas Family Farms Close.

“Richard Horan has brought us a welcome view of America to defy the prevailing political and financial nastiness. This is a timely and important book.”—Ted Morgan, author of Wilderness at Dawn

“A lively visit with the dauntless men and women who operate America’s family farms and help provide our miraculous annual bounty. Richard Horan writes with energy and passion.”—Hannah Nordhaus, author of The Beekeeper’s Lament

“Horan’s new book evocatively describes the peril and promise of family farms in America. I loved joining him on this journey, and so will you.”—T.A. Barron, author of The Great Tree of Avalon

In Seeds, novelist and nature writer Richard Horan sought out the trees that inspired the work of great American writers like Faulkner, Kerouac, Welty, Wharton, and Harper Lee. In Harvest, Horan embarks upon a serendipitous journey across America to work the harvests of more than a dozen essential or unusual food crops—and, in the process, forms powerful connections with the farmers, the soil, and the seasons.

  • Elildelm
I finished reading Richard Horan's book, Harvest: An Adventure into the Heart of America's Family Farms, on the same day I picked up the first CSA veggie box of the season from the family farm my family has supported for years through our participation in what they harvest for our dinner table. Horan describes his journey across America to harvest one crop or another from ten different family farms. These farmers welcome Horan into their lives for a short time, and he relates their story with wit and insight. Readers who like real food and want to visit with a series of farmers will find that this book is the perfect meal. Now to prepare tonight's supper: something with the just-picked ramps, asparagus, lettuces, radishes, dandelion greens and bok choy. Rice will be involved.

Rating: Four-star (I like it)
  • Otiel
The book is a captivating narrative of Richard Horan's journey through family farms across America. The author travels to over 10 farms across the country and lives with farmers and their families during key harvest periods.

While growing up in India, I had heard second-hand accounts of subsistence farmers and their travails. It was interesting to read of similar experiences of western family-farmers, some of them first-generation agriculturalists. While narrating his observations at the farms, the author also points out some differences between commercial farms and the family farmers, CSA farm movement.

Great read for those interested in adventures and experiments in modern day agriculture
  • Cktiell
Richard Horan spends a summer and fall visiting family farms across the United States to help bring in the harvest, ranging from wheat in Kansas to wild rice in Michigan to cranberries in Massachusetts to walnuts in California. For him, it's nothing less than a search for the soul of America, a quest to find out if there's still an alternative to numbing consumerism and conformity. He narrates the journey in lively, opinionated prose, sketching vivid portraits of the farmers he visits, their families, and their workers while including plenty of fascinating technical details about how farmers actually go about harvesting their crops.

If you've bought food at a farmer's market or a CSA, if you've read Michael Pollan's books on what's wrong with the American food system, HARVEST will strike a chord with you. Even those who don't agree with Horan's take will find him to be good company. In the end--to his own surprise--Horan finds the state of our nation's soul to be healthier than expected.
  • Ranterl
The farmers that the author visits with are interesting people and their stories are entertaining. The author inserts himself into the story and l it would be a much better book if he had left himself out, since he comes across as being really irritating. The book reads as if it was written by a high school kid who uses a thesaurus every other page to stick in big words that completely don't fit in with the style. I finished the book out of obligation, but it probably wasn't worth the time.
  • in waiting
The idea was good but the execution was terrible. The author drags his own all too predictable left wing politics into the discussion at every chance, that is when he isn't tallking about himself or lusting after every female under the age of 35.

The truth is that farmers come for all segments of political views. This is particularly true of small family farms and the new local food movement. Food security is something that concerns us all not just the judgmental lefties. By spewing this tainted crap the author does the entire movement an injustice.

I would say "keep your day job" to the author but I certainly wouldn't want him teaching my daughter's English class.
  • Zulkigis
He is so completely off base its not funny. Our food system is beyond fragile and its only getting worse. I am still trying to comprehend how this man got published.
  • Yramede
The author travels to many different local farms across the country to learn about their farm practices and to take part with the families in the harvest. It was an interesting and enjoyable read.