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Download Building Legitimacy: Political Discourses and Forms of Legitimation in Medieval Societies (Medieval Mediterranean: Peoples, Economies and Cultures, 400-1500) eBook

by Isabel Alfonso Anton,Professor of Arabic Hugh Kennedy,Julio Escalona Monge

Download Building Legitimacy: Political Discourses and Forms of Legitimation in Medieval Societies (Medieval Mediterranean: Peoples, Economies and Cultures, 400-1500) eBook
ISBN:
9004133054
Author:
Isabel Alfonso Anton,Professor of Arabic Hugh Kennedy,Julio Escalona Monge
Category:
Home Improvement & Design
Language:
English
Publisher:
Brill (October 23, 2003)
Pages:
360 pages
EPUB book:
1652 kb
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1130 kb
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1172 kb
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4.3
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Building Legitimacy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Building Legitimacy: Political Discourses and Forms of Legitimation in Medieval Societies.

Building Legitimacy book.

Isabel Alfonso Antón, P. Julio Escalona Monge, P. 1980) in Political Science, Universidad Complutense (Madrid), is Investigadora Científica at Instituto de Historia (CSIC), Madrid. 1996) in Medieval History, Universidad Complutense (Madrid), is Investigador Contratado at Instituto de Historia (CSIC), Madrid. Hugh Kennedy is Professor of Arabic at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and has published extensively on the Islamic World in the Middle Ages, including The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates (London, 1986) and Muslim Spain and Portugal: a political history of al-Andalus (London, 1996).

Open Day 2020 Booking Form. Combining and borrowing. Japanese Culture and Society. Japanese Politics and International Relations. The aim was to replace the constraints imposed by national history writing, Moroccan and Spanish, and binary interpretations of Muslim versus Christian cultural spheres in favour of a more nuanced comparison of the development of the Marīnid and Naṣrid sultanates and their relations with Castile, Aragon and other nearby powers.

The medieval English saw their economy as comprising three groups – the clergy, who . the next five centuries the economy would at first grow and then suffer an acute crisis, resulting in significant political and economic change.

The medieval English saw their economy as comprising three groups – the clergy, who prayed; the knights, who fought; and the peasants, who worked the land.

Professor Wendy Scase will be discussing, 'Visible English: Scribal Practice, Graphic Culture and Identity'. Eventbrite brings people together through live experiences. Discover events that match your passions, or create your own with online ticketing tools. Hope to see you there! Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS). 5 December 2019 ·. ‪Come one and all to Ye Olde MEMS Christemasse Quizze led by our fab co-directors Dr Ryan Perry & Dr Emily Guerry. Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS).

Alfonso, Isabel (2004) Building Legitimacy: Political Discourses and Forms of Legitimacy in Medieval Societies. Culture and Society in Medieval Galicia: A Cultural Crossroads at the Edge of Europe.

Alfonso, Isabel (2004). Judicial Rhetoric and Political Legitimation in Medieval León-Castile". Building Legitimacy: Political Discourses and Forms of Legitimacy in Medieval Societies. Collins, Roger (2012). López Sangil, José Luis (2002).

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Medieval trade cities had a lower probability of guild participation indicating . Between 1945 and 1950, the inflow of people increased the population in municipalities where expellees could settle by 2. percent.

Medieval trade cities had a lower probability of guild participation indicating that not economic prosperity per se is decisive but rather that formerly poor groups of citizens like craftsmen profited from the economic upswing. The study also finds evidence for the existence of spatial spillovers implying that strategic considerations played a role in the spread of the revolts.

This volume presents a selection of papers exploring the ways by which medieval powers sought to legitimize themselves, the political discourses through which this was effected, and a wide range of related problems. The six chapters in Part I analyse particular cases in which processes of legitimation can be seen at work, in order to disentangle the wide range of strategies and resources deployed by competing actors in a given context. Part II gathers five articles discussing the specific discourses of legitimation contained in a text or group of related texts, in order to expose their intricacies and their bearing on the way historians look at their sources. The book is of relevance for readers interested in new ways of approaching the History of Power.With contributions by Frances Andrews, Carlos Estepa, Paul Fouracre, Chris Given-Wilson, Piotr Górecki, Patrick Henriet, José Antonio Jara Fuente, Cristina Jular Pérez-Alfaro and Stephen D. White.Contributors include: Paul Fouracre, Stephen White, Isabel Alfonso, Chris Given-Wilson, Cristina Jular Pérez-Alfaro, José Antonio Jara Fuente, Carlos Estepa, Julio Escalona, Piotr Górecki, Patrick Henriet, Frances Andrews.