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Download The Farming Game eBook

by Bryan L. Jones

Download The Farming Game eBook
ISBN:
0803225598
Author:
Bryan L. Jones
Category:
Humor
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press; 1st US - 1st Printing edition (October 1, 1982)
Pages:
221 pages
EPUB book:
1267 kb
FB2 book:
1583 kb
DJVU:
1713 kb
Other formats
txt lit azw docx
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
215


Bryan Jones is that rare thing, a real farmer who also writes. The Farming Game is the one book I've seen that I would give to someone who was thinking of moving to the country and actually supporting himself or herself off the land.

Bryan Jones is that rare thing, a real farmer who also writes. Anyone who picks it up stop laughing. First at the dozen portraits of different types of farmers. Then at various barbed asides in the three long essays on how farmers can and do make money. Jones has a wicked wit. book is remarkably educative. Mixed with the humor is a mass of information and analysis

The Farming Game book. In cantankerous opinions, hard-headed advice, and free-swinging sketches of real farmers, Bryan Jones addresses everyone who feels the pull of the land

The Farming Game book. In cantankerous opinions, hard-headed advice, and free-swinging sketches. In cantankerous opinions, hard-headed advice, and free-swinging sketches of real farmers, Bryan Jones addresses everyone who feels the pull of the land. He accepts the emotional appeal of going back to the land and then takes the unconventional stand that, above all, farming can be a good way to make money.

You can read The Farming Game by Jones, Bryan, 1945- in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Bryan L. Jones's books. Bryan L. Jones’s Followers. None yet. Bryan’s Bookshelves.

In cantankerous opinions, hard-headed advice, and free-swinging sketches of real farmers, Bryan Jones addresses everyone who feels the pull of the land. He accepts the emotional appeal of "going back to the land" and then takes the unconventional stand that, above all, farming can be a good way to make money.

Last Monday Kathy Trimble and the Logan County Library hosted a book talk in Stapleton, Nebraska.

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 03 October 2008. Export citation Request permission.

But Jones’s world is not one of sentimental nostalgia; running battles with town bullies, sobering encounters with religious . Jones teaches reading at McCook Junior High School in McCook, Nebraska. He is the author of The Farming Game (Nebraska 1982).

But Jones’s world is not one of sentimental nostalgia; running battles with town bullies, sobering encounters with religious buffoons, and an impressive collection of pedagogues specializing in violent corporal punishment capture the earthy essence of a world now largely disappeared. Библиографические данные. Mark Twain Made Me Do It and Other Plains Adventures. U of Nebraska Press, 2018.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. What distinguishes The Farming Game from a mere how-to book is the author's sharp eye for the absurd detail in his portraits of people and his descriptions of the lending policies of banks, the government price controls and the production methods of agribusiness that make it difficult for the independent farmer to compete". Bryan Jones is that rare thing, a real farmer who also writes.

In cantankerous opinions, hard-headed advice, and free-swinging sketches of real farmers, Bryan Jones addresses everyone who feels the pull of the land. He accepts the emotional appeal of “going back to the land” and then takes the unconventional stand that, above all, farming can be a good way to make money. Against the grain of public policy that, he maintains, encourages big agriculture, Jones works out how a shrewd, stubborn small farmer can still make a go of it.

His keen-eyed sketches of farmers at work show the variety of ways a farmer may succeed or fail. Even his own neighborhood, dominated by thousands of acres of corn and high technology, is peopled with “scalper” who makes a living in the cattle business with little more stake than a gooseneck trailer, a telephone, and his native wits; the sheep man who secretly grows rich while looking poor and raising an animal that other farmer disdain; the experimenter who never turns a nickel himself, but whose successful innovations are readily adopted by his neighbors; the hog raiser who makes a large family pay.

The heart of the book is the primer for novices—and for city folk who dream of farming. Jones emphasizes the practicalities of farm finance and recommends sidelines for the beginner—welding, giving guitar lessons, keeping the books for a local elevator—as an alternative to starving. He urges newcomers to start small and to be sure that farming is something they really want to do. To interested bystanders, The Farming Game offers one farmer’s audacious, stimulating, and entertaining view of American agriculture today.

  • Maridor
Very funny, at times! I laughed until I cried here and there! Jones is a gifted wit with a fine writing style.
Extremely valuable for anyone contemplating a change to rural life. Also valuable as an elucidation of basic economic truths: ignore these and wind up like Venezuela.
Tantalizing glimpses of what life in America without Federal diktats in agriculture might have been like. With some imagination, we can see how the Rural Electrification Act of 1935 spoiled alternative energy for 75 years, or so.
  • Anasius
The back to earth start a farm movement started a long time ago. I read this book from the library 20 years ago and just bought my own copy. This needs to be on kindle. If you like Joe Salatin you'll like this.
  • Samugul
Don't even think of moving to the country without this book. With good humor, Jones teaches you everything you need to know!
  • Steelrunner
The characters portrayed here you've either met or after reading you'll wish you had. Jones does an excellent job weaving the trials and tribulations of farming and ranching with the truly unique characters that are found down on the farm. I'd highly recommend it.
  • Molotok
Written in the early 1980's this book is still quite relevant. It's a great read - very well written and funny - and it presents very clear lessons on agricultural economics in an approachable format.

I recommend this book as a great way to learn something while being entertained.