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Download Why You Should Store Your Farts in a Jar Afflictions, Remedies, and Cures: and Other Oddball or Gross Maladies, Afflictions, Remedies, and Cures eBook

by David Haviland

Download Why You Should Store Your Farts in a Jar Afflictions, Remedies, and Cures: and Other Oddball or Gross Maladies, Afflictions, Remedies, and Cures eBook
ISBN:
1585428574
Author:
David Haviland
Category:
Humor
Language:
English
Publisher:
TarcherPerigee (December 30, 2010)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1925 kb
FB2 book:
1595 kb
DJVU:
1728 kb
Other formats
mobi azw lrf lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
895


Afflictions, Remedies, and "Cures" Paperback – December 30, 2010.

Why You Should Store Your Farts in a Jar Afflictions, Remedies, and "Cures": and Other Oddball or Gross Maladies, Afflictions, Remedies, and "Cures" Paperback – December 30, 2010. by. David Haviland (Author). Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).

The follow-up bestseller Why Fish Fart & Other Useless or Gross Information About the World contained an artful . Interesting answers to questions in a few short paragraphs for each question. I might check out the other books in this series.

The follow-up bestseller Why Fish Fart & Other Useless or Gross Information About the World contained an artful selection of odd and/or unsavory facts about the world. Why Dogs Eat Poop scoured the animal kingdom for gross and or off-color facts about animals. Jul 01, 2015 Angel rated it it was amazing.

Author David Haviland really dug into history to come up with some pretty esoteric stories in his compilation Why You Should Store Your .

Author David Haviland really dug into history to come up with some pretty esoteric stories in his compilation Why You Should Store Your Farts in a Jar (And Other Oddball or Gross Maladies, Afflictions, Remedies, and Cures ). This was a book I was really looking forward to reading. I have a strange sense of humor and an interest in the bizarre. Those into gross, weird, and bizarre things will enjoy Farts in a Jar, while the rest will not. Given my tastes and predilections, I was surprised that I felt a bit disappointed by the time I finished the book. It didn’t help that the title story of why one might want to capture a fart in a jar was gross and sounded a bit thin.

Other Oddball or Gross Maladies, Afflictions, Remedies, and "Cures" .

Why You Should Store Your Farts in a Jar: and Other Oddball or Gross Maladies, Afflictions, Remedies, and "Cures". The next book in the strange and fascinating series that began with the national bestseller Why You Shouldn't Eat Your Boogers & Other Useless or Gross Information About Your Body. In this delightfully disgusting new book in the series, David Haviland plumbs the world of medicine to uncover the answers to such vitally important questions as: What exactly is urine therapy? Is it safe to fly with breast implants?

David has written a number of books of amusing trivia and popular science. The most recent, How To Remove A Brain (Summersdale, 2012), is a collection of fascinating stories and anecdotes concerning the history of medicine and health

The next book in the strange and fascinating series that began with the national bestseller Why You Shouldn't Eat Your Boogers & Other Useless or Gross Information.

The next book in the strange and fascinating series that began with the national bestseller Why You Shouldn't Eat Your Boogers & Other Useless or Gross Information. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Should Store Your Farts in a Jar & Other Oddball or Gross Maladies, Afflictions, Remedies and 'Cures. After sifting through endless history books and medical journals, Haviland said he was most surprised to learn how King George V really died in 1936.

The prescription for better health included farting into a jar and sniffing your brand when you were feeling feeble, according to David Haviland, author of the new weird medical trivia book, "Why You Should Store Your Farts in a Jar & Other Oddball or Gross Maladies, Afflictions, Remedies and 'Cures. Though it was initially reported that the royal leader died of natural causes, the truth is, the King died at the hands of his own doctor, Lord Dawson of Penn.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Why you should store your farts in a jar : and other oddball or gross maladies, afflictions, remedies, or "cures" David Haviland. Book's title: Why you should store your farts in a jar : and other oddball or gross maladies, afflictions, remedies, or "cures" David Haviland. Library of Congress Control Number: 2010029421.

David Haviland has plumbed the world of medicine to uncover the answers to such vitally important questions as: What exactly . Why do some boxers drink their own pee? What is cyclic vomiting syndrome and how can one avoid it?

David Haviland has plumbed the world of medicine to uncover the answers to such vitally important questions as: What exactly is urine therapy? Is it safe to fly with breast implants? How did a spatula find its way into a surgery patient's body? Why do some boxers drink their own pee? What is cyclic vomiting syndrome and how can one avoid it? Any fan of the absurd and/or obscure is sure to delight in this strange (and slightly stomach-turning) book.

David Haviland, author of the medical trivia book Why You Should Store Your Farts in a Jar & Other Oddball or Gross Maladies, Afflictions, Remedies and ‘Cures’, points out that: This way, when the plague.

David Haviland, author of the medical trivia book Why You Should Store Your Farts in a Jar & Other Oddball or Gross Maladies, Afflictions, Remedies and ‘Cures’, points out that: This way, when the plague appeared in their neighborhood, they could open the jar and inhale the fumes to ward off the bad vapors that came with the disease. 12. Heroin as a cough syrup. The German drug company Bayer started their professional medical career by selling heroin in a syrup form in 1898. Heroin syrup was prescribed to treat coughs, even for small children, and for other things such as insomnia and back pain.

The next book in the strange and fascinating series that began with the national bestseller Why You Shouldn't Eat Your Boogers & Other Useless or Gross Information About Your Body. The national bestseller Why You Shouldn't Eat Your Boogers & Other Useless or Gross Information About Your Body uncovered everything one might want to know (and a few things one might not) about the human body. The follow-up bestseller Why Fish Fart & Other Useless or Gross Information About the World contained an artful selection of odd and/or unsavory facts about the world. Why Dogs Eat Poop scoured the animal kingdom for gross and or off-color facts about animals. In this delightfully disgusting new book in the series, David Haviland plumbs the world of medicine to uncover the answers to such vitally important questions as: *What exactly is urine therapy? *Is it safe to fly with breast implants? *How did a nine-and-a-half-inch spatula find its way into a surgery patient's body? *Why do some boxers drink their own pee? *What is cyclic vomiting syndrome and how can one avoid it? Any fan of the absurd and/or obscure is sure to delight in this strange (and slightly stomach-turning) book.
  • Shistus
I was walking in a book store and seen this book so when I got home I ordered it from Amazon as a gift for my oldest son in South Africa. Well he enjoyed it so much and shared it with his co-workers (it's still be circulated amongst his staff) in Cape town. So based on a text I received I ordered another from Amazon and gave it to my youngest son and he enjoyed it. His is now circulating at his in-laws as part of their "tiki bar" library of humor
  • Falya
Okay, I admit the title is a turn off, but it really isn't indicative of the content of the book. It's not nearly that sophomoric. The topic here is crazy medicine and scary medical history. It's filled with amazing stories about medical practice past and present. You'll read about the surgeon whose claim to fame was speed, an important factor in the days before anesthesia. However, there is such a thing as too fast--as when he amputated two of his assistant's fingers and the patient's testicle during hasty leg amputations. Read about the medical student who picked up a cadaver's arm and waved it at some ghoulish children peeping into the window of the dissection room. He said, "This is your mother's arem. I just dug it up, and I'm going to hit you with it." This inspired a riot against doctors because it happened that the mother of one of the children had just died, and her grave had been robbed, her body stolen--a not unusual practice by medical students. You'll read about the tape worm trap that was similar to a mouse trap. You swallowed it attached to a string. When you felt the worm take the bait, you pulled the trap and the worm out--and it really worked. All right, I'll stop now. I don't want to give all the good stuff away. Suffice to say, you will have fun with this book, and learn some things about medical history as well.
  • Ffrlel
I wasn't quite sure what to expect from this book but it was fantastic. It was funny, gross, informative, interesting and odd. After reading it, I have a whole new batch of water cooler conversation topics. My hubbie and I enjoyed this book so much that we shared it with our nephew.
  • Hidden Winter
Was a gag gift for Christmas. Went over great some interesting facts actually.
  • Xaluenk
I got this for my step-nephew. He's eight and loves fart jokes. Good thing I opened it and read a little because it isn't really kid material.Especially a kid of conservative parents. I love it though! So does my nine year old, but I am definitely more liberal in my children's reading material.
  • Corgustari
"Why You Should Store Your Farts in a Jar" is one book in a series in the rare genre of cerebral scatological humor. Author David Haviland previously provoked mildly disgusting decorum with such works as "Why You Shouldn't Eat Your Boogers," "Why Fish Fart," and "Why Dogs Eat Poop," and has now devoted a book to various maladies and medical practices for the titillation of the morbidly curious.

This book contains several hundred fairly useless facts broken down into categories such as "Disgusting Diseases," "Dodgy Diagnoses," and "Rude Bits." Diseases suck as elephantiasis and Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) are covered appropriately, and less common questions such as "Can people grow horns?" (Yes!) are answered. If you ever wondered which disease was thought to be cured by having the afflicted person wearing a donkey's halter led three times around a pigsty, the answer is right here. (Of course it's mumps....Thank you Irish folk medicine.)

Many greats in the field of medicine bask in their glory here. For instance, The ampulla of Vater is an area where the common bile and pancreatic ducts meet. It was first discovered by the great German anatomist, Abraham Vater (but you probably already knew that.) Likewise, occupation-specific medical data is discussed (e.g. "Why are pig farmers more likely to have their appendixes removed?") By far my favorite section of the book is found on pp. 198-199, and is titled "What is a UBI?" The answer is "Unexplained Beer Injury" and the list that follows is of acronyms and obscure terms doctors use amongst themselves in discussions of patients. I suppose that every profession has its equivalent, but I was especially entertained to discover that "DBI" stands for "Dirtbag Index" (and is calculated by multiplying the number of tattoos on a patient by the number of teeth that patient is missing,) that "Code Yellow" is a bladder control emergency, that "Oligoneuronal" is a nice way of saying "thick," and that the "Departure Lounge" is the geriatric ward. The book does not explain the irresponsibly poor penmanship of doctors, however.

This is a strangely interesting book of medical trivia; it may be gross, but it is humorously diverting. I recommend it for people who seem compelled to learn disgusting facts about the human body and the practice of medicine. It is not for the humor-impaired or those prone to CVS, which is, as of yet, unexplained.
  • Sat
This is the second book I've read in this series, and while there isn't as much in here that I've wondered about while stoned (or curious), due to a majority of it containing facts about people or things I didn't know about, I did learn things that turned out to be just as interesting as the things I wondered about. For instance, Hitler was a crystal meth addict, and it may or may not be true that he had only one ball. Seriously, priceless info!
Well, a different read full of interesting little stories from way back and when and recent. Each question and answer has to do with medical happenings and myths debunked.Unfortunately, my review for this book will be short and sweet. It was a great non fiction read, very random and one may call a great toilet book. It was a book that my dad would definitely enjoy for its quirky facts.

I would pass this book along to all my friends who love to read quirky little books and learn quirky facts.