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Download Truth Like the Sun (Vintage Contemporaries) eBook

by Jim Lynch

Download Truth Like the Sun (Vintage Contemporaries) eBook
ISBN:
0307949346
Author:
Jim Lynch
Category:
Humor
Language:
English
Publisher:
Vintage; Reprint edition (January 22, 2013)
Pages:
253 pages
EPUB book:
1115 kb
FB2 book:
1971 kb
DJVU:
1763 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
503


Truth Like the Sun, Jim Lynch's great new book, is timely, compelling, and emotionally satisfying. In 1962, the city of Seattle is poised for the excitement of hosting the World's Fair, and the Space Needle is the crowning jewel of this event.

Truth Like the Sun, Jim Lynch's great new book, is timely, compelling, and emotionally satisfying. Young Roger Morgan is the so-called "King of the Fair," as he pushed the city's leaders and financial supporters to throw their weight behind it, and he allegedly designed the Space Needle on a cocktail napkin.

Truth Like the Sun (Vintage Contemporaries). The National Post (Canada) Whimsical, sensitive and full of heart. The sense of place the author creates is only possible through humility, a slowed-down attentiveness and sensitivity to nature

This book probably has the most meaning for you if you are a true native of Seattle. Truth Like the Sun Vintage Contemporaries. Издание: перепечатанное.

A classic and hugely entertaining political novel, the cat-and-mouse story of urban intrigue in Seattle both in 1962, when Seattle hosted the World's Fair, and in 2001, after its transformation in the Microsoft gold rush. This book probably has the most meaning for you if you are a true native of Seattle. If you're not, at best, it will give you the slimmest of glimpses into the Seattle of 1962 but it doesn't flesh out. Vintage Contemporaries, 2013.

Truth Like the Sun, Lynch's third novel, (its title quite appropriately based on one of Elvis . Northwest novelist Jim Lynch proves as steady a hand on books as boats The Oregonian, 2009-06-22 - Retrieved on 2010-06-25.

Truth Like the Sun, Lynch's third novel, (its title quite appropriately based on one of Elvis Presley's most celebrated quotes, namely "Truth is like the sun. You can shut it out for a time, but it ain't going away. was released in April 2012. Set in Seattle, during the 1962 World's Fair, a time when Presley and other celebrities, including Vice President Lyndon Johnson visited it as well as in 2001, the story involves the investigation of a city legend by an ambitious reporter. Jim Lynch at Random House, Inc. v. t.

When Truth Like the Sun isn’t at the 1962 fair, it is 2001. By then Helen is newly arrived in Seattle, working for The Post-Intelligencer and seeking to make her reputation

When Truth Like the Sun isn’t at the 1962 fair, it is 2001. By then Helen is newly arrived in Seattle, working for The Post-Intelligencer and seeking to make her reputation. She is the kind of reporter who will worm her way into a room in a nursing home to interview an unsuspecting old lady, Roger’s mother. That his mother is an Anglophile, loves having Roger read the Harry Potter books to her and confuses the Duke of Edinburgh with Dumbledore are just part of this novel’s unpredictable charm.

Truth Like the Sun book. As Jim Lynch writes in his taut and accomplished new novel, Truth Like the Sun, the Space Needle was meant to beckon newcomers to Seattle: Where better to start afresh? A whole new way of living in a city of things to come.

Truth like the sun, by Jim Lynch. Ist ed. p. cm. This is a Borzoi book.

Truth like the sun. by. Lynch, Jim, 1961-. Century 21 Exposition (1962 : Seattle, Wash. Century 21 Exposition, Century 21 Exposition (1962 : Seattle, Wash. Women journalists, Reporters and reporting, Mayors, Women journalists, Mayors, Reporters and reporting, Women journalists, Roman, Amerikanisches Englisch, Women journalists, Secrets. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

series Vintage Contemporaries.

A classic and hugely entertaining political novel, the cat-and-mouse story of urban intrigue in Seattle both in 1962, when Seattle hosted the World's Fair, and in 2001, after its transformation in the Microsoft gold rush.Larger than life, Roger Morgan was the mastermind behind the fair that made the city famous and is still a backstage power forty years later, when at the age of seventy he runs for mayor in hopes of restoring all of Seattle's former glory. Helen Gulanos, a reporter every bit as eager to make her mark, sees her assignment to investigate the events of 1962 become front-page news with Morgan's candidacy, and resolves to find out who he really is and where his power comes from: in 1962, a brash and excitable young promoter, greeting everyone from Elvis Presley to Lyndon Johnson, smooth-talking himself out of difficult situations, dipping in and out of secret card games; now, a beloved public figure with, it turns out, still-plentiful secrets. Wonderfully interwoven into this tale of the city of dreams are backroom deals, idealism and pragmatism, the best and worst ambitions, and all the aspirations that shape our communities and our lives.
  • Eigeni
Truth Like the Sun, Jim Lynch's great new book, is timely, compelling, and emotionally satisfying. In 1962, the city of Seattle is poised for the excitement of hosting the World's Fair, and the Space Needle is the crowning jewel of this event. Young Roger Morgan is the so-called "King of the Fair," as he pushed the city's leaders and financial supporters to throw their weight behind it, and he allegedly designed the Space Needle on a cocktail napkin. He has the world in his hands, with entertainers, world leaders, even married women marveling at what he has created, and he is proud of the changes he was responsible for bringing to Seattle. Yet as he revels in the glory of the event, he is still looking for something more.

Flash forward to 2001. Seattle is reeling from the bursting of the tech bubble, and crime and incivility have taken hold in the city. Seventy-year-old Roger Morgan, who used his fame from the World's Fair to gain influence as an adviser to countless politicians, surprises the city by declaring his candidacy for mayor, running against an incumbent he had once assisted. Many in the city rush to embrace this one-time king and fringe candidate, while others scramble to figure out exactly who Roger Morgan is, including Seattle Post-Intelligencer reporter Helen Gulanos. Driven both by her need to understand Morgan and what he stands for, as well as her desire to write a Pulitzer-worthy story, she throws her all into investigating every corner of Morgan's life, from 1962 until the present. And as she finds herself drawn by his magnetism, she's also drawn by what she finds out.

The book switches between 1962 and 2001, from Roger's early glory days to his seeking once last fling with fame and power. Lynch does a fantastic job weaving the two narratives, and I found myself in the same quandary as Helen--I wanted to know more about what makes Morgan tick but I was also afraid of what might be uncovered. In this era of news being driven as much by innuendo as fact, I found this book tremendously timely, but at its heart this is the story of a man motivated more by his desire to make his city the center of the world, one who gets caught up in the glory of doing so. I really enjoyed this book a great deal. Lynch is a fantastic writer and all of his books have captivated me in similar ways.
  • Doukree
Living in Seattle, I first got introduced to Jim Lynch when "The Highest Tide" came out and subsequently saw a local stage production of the book. I loved his writing, his passion and precision when writing about the Pacific Northwest and have followed his career ever since.

"Truth Like the Sun" is his timely new novel (this being the 50th anniversary) grounded in the 1962 World's Fair, a coming out party for the city of Seattle. Lynch interweaves a fictional story around Roger Morgan, fictional head of the World's Fair, and Helen Gulanos, investigative reporter for the Seattle P-I in 2001, 39 years later in 2001 when Roger decides to run for mayor of Seattle in his early 70's.

Lynch alternates chapters between 1962 and 2001, slowly unfolding details of Morgan's oversight of the World's Fair amidst Seattle's underbelly of graft and corruption and his mayoral campaign dogged by journalist Gulanos as she attempts to dig up dirt on Morgan and his past. The real beauty of Lynch's writing are the small details ---- he creates memorable interactions and dialogue between Morgan and LJB, Elvis and Count Basie as they come to Seattle to celebrate the fair against a backdrop of extreme tension between the US and USSR culminating in the Cuban Missle Crisis. Morgan's mayoral run 39 years later takes place in the months preceding 9/11, Seattle now a "grown-up" city is recovering from the boom and bust of the dot-com bubble. As the bubble bursts, and Morgan sets his sights on public office, the city fondly recalls its past glory through his campaign, while others are dredging up the sordid past.

Lynch superbly weaves through past and present to construct a paean to a city, the good and bad, that forged its unique identity. Lynch doesn't attempt to wrap any neat bows on the contradictions and characters at the center of this novel, leaving the reader to interpret the shades of grey underlying "Truth Like the Sun".