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by Isolde Standish

Download A New History of Japanese Cinema: A Century of Narrative Film eBook
ISBN:
0826417906
Author:
Isolde Standish
Category:
Movies
Language:
English
Publisher:
Continuum (May 8, 2006)
Pages:
414 pages
EPUB book:
1788 kb
FB2 book:
1732 kb
DJVU:
1155 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
819


A New History of Japanese. has been added to your Cart. Isolde Standish has written what I think to be the most informative and convincing historical survey (in english) on the rich tradition of film production in Japan

A New History of Japanese. Isolde Standish has written what I think to be the most informative and convincing historical survey (in english) on the rich tradition of film production in Japan. Donald Richie, in the same year (2005), also published (yet again) another book on the history of Japanese cinema (actually the hardback was pub. in 2002 but the paperback came out this last year).

In A New History of Cinema, which first arrived in Japan in 1896 with the Kinetoscope prototype, came at the very .

In A New History of Cinema, which first arrived in Japan in 1896 with the Kinetoscope prototype, came at the very time that Japan was transforming its economic base and society into that of a major international power. The first cinema, the Asakusa Denkikan, was opened in Tokyo in 1903 and within thirteen years three hundred cinemas had sprung up throughout the country. In A New History of Japanese Cinema: A Century of Narrative Film, Isolde Standish focuses on the historical development of Japanese film.

A New History of Japanese Cinema takes a genuinely innovative approach to the subject, and should prove an essential resource for many years to come. Includes an 8-page color plate section and an 8-page black and white plate section.

Автор: Standish, Isolde Название: New history of japanese cinema Издательство: Continuum Издательство .

Drawing upon Japanese film scholarship that has never been published outside Japan, this book provides a chronological survey of a range of films and sheds light on films and directors that are not so famous on the international stage, as well as on those who are.

In this major new study of a century of Japanese narrative film-making, Isolde Standish provides an in-depth chronological survey of a huge range of films

In this major new study of a century of Japanese narrative film-making, Isolde Standish provides an in-depth chronological survey of a huge range of films. The book draws upon a great deal of Japanese film scholarship that has never been published outside of Japan, and sheds light on films and directors that are not so famous on the international stage, as well as on those who are (Ozu, Mizoguchi and Kurosawa). The book also features extensive appendices, including a full filmography and biographical information on prominent people in the Japanese film industry.

Presents the history of Japanese cinema which has had an international . The book concludes with an investigation of genre and gender in mainstream films of recent years.

Presents the history of Japanese cinema which has had an international influence. After an introduction outlining the earliest years of cinema in Japan, Standish demonstrates cinema's symbolic position in Japanese society in the 1930s - as both a metaphor and a motor of modernity.

In A New History of Japanese Cinema Isolde Standish focuses on the historical development of Japanese film. She details an industry and an art form shaped by the competing and merging forces of traditional culture and of economic and technological innovation.

Home Standish, Isolde A New History of Japanese Cinema: A Century of. .Bibliographic Details

Home Standish, Isolde A New History of Japanese Cinema: A Century of Narrative Film. A New History of Japanese Cinema: A Century of Narrative Film. ISBN 10: 0826417094, ISBN 13: 9780826417091. Book has a little highlighting and underlining in front portion, otherwise book would be fine condition. Bookseller Inventory 25443. Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Title: A New History of Japanese Cinema: A Century. Publisher: United Kingdom: Continuum Intl Pub Group. Publication Date: 2005.

There was a world of difference between the two, and I must say that I favored (by a long shot) the method and approach of Standish over that of Richie. Besides, it is nice to hear another voice in the discourse other than that of "the most authoritative critic of Japanese cinema.

April 5, 2019 History. a century of narrative film. Published 2005 by Continuum in New York. A new history of Japanese cinema. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove A new history of Japanese cinema from your list? A new history of Japanese cinema.

In A New History of Japanese Cinema Isolde Standish focuses on the historical development of Japanese film. She details an industry and an art form shaped by the competing and merging forces of traditional culture and of economic and technological innovation. Adopting a thematic, exploratory approach, Standish links the concept of Japanese cinema as a system of communication with some of the central discourses of the twentieth century: modernism, nationalism, humanism, resistance, and gender.

After an introduction outlining the earliest years of cinema in Japan, Standish demonstrates cinema's symbolic position in Japanese society in the 1930s - as both a metaphor and a motor of modernity. Moving into the late thirties and early forties, Standish analyses cinema's relationship with the state-focusing in particular on the war and occupation periods. The book's coverage of the post-occupation period looks at "romance" films in particular. Avant-garde directors came to the fore during the 1960s and early seventies, and their work is discussed in depth. The book concludes with an investigation of genre and gender in mainstream films of recent years.

In grappling with Japanese film history and criticism, most western commentators have concentrated on offering interpretations of what have come to be considered "classic" films. A New History of Japanese Cinema takes a genuinely innovative approach to the subject, and should prove an essential resource for many years to come.

  • Huston
Standish generally writes well. At times, she repeats herself once too often, or trails off on a tangent only distantly related to the topic at hand. The side-tracks are interesting, however, and these issues aside, the writing is clear, comprehensible, well explained, well cited, and with plenty of examples and resources for further inquiry by the reader. She also has a sense of humour I appreciated, too often lacking from a serious study of film and history, and not so overdone as to be out of place.

The cinematic aspects of what she covers, with the exception of an inexplicable misunderstanding of deep focus, are spot-on. This my professor of film informed me, and being no expert on film, I cannot myself elaborate.

The historical aspects are sometimes overgeneralised or misrepresented, but in ways excusable to the well-read historian (ie, my professor) as being due to many Japanese, and a few foreign, historians' own misunderstandings of history not corrected until recent times, some only after the book was published. With these exceptions, the history and research is sound and relevant. Being an amateur historian, it is here that the book loses a star, though the fault is not unique to the author, nor present in every chapter.

There are few books in English covering this subject, and my professor informed the class that no other (English language) books written in the past two decades covers in depth both the cinematic and historical backgrounds of Japanese film. Standish makes such a feat appear effortless.
  • Garr
Quite possibly the most misinformed, Eurocentric bit of hogwash that has ever been written on Japanese cinema. Someone should also introduce Ms. Standish to the concepts of "the period" and "the run-on sentence"; the book would certainly benefit from greater inclusion of the former and avoidance of the latter, although the result would only be slightly more stylistically pleasing hogwash.
  • Araath
WAY too dry and scholarly, I couldn't even get past the foreword. It is not for the average reader who just wants a history of Japanese film.
  • Shak
Isolde Standish has written what I think to be the most informative and convincing historical survey (in english) on the rich tradition of film production in Japan. Donald Richie, in the same year (2005), also published (yet again) another book on the history of Japanese cinema (actually the hardback was pub. in 2002 but the paperback came out this last year). Although Richie's book was just a new, updated edition of already published material I picked it up along with this book and read them together. There was a world of difference between the two, and I must say that I favored (by a long shot) the method and approach of Standish over that of Richie. Besides, it is nice to hear another voice in the discourse other than that of "the most authoritative critic of Japanese cinema." No one remains authority forever and, if you ask me, Richie's time is up.

As funny as it sounds, what makes this book more interesting is that it is much more historical. The book pays careful, constant attention to the socio-political contexts that undoubtedly inform and affect the cultural production of the times - and it does this in both national and global terms. Standish investigates how 'national cinema' functions -in the context of economic and societal transition- to shape and affect the perpetual constructions of national consciousness and identity. Suprisingly, she concentrates less on the effects of after-the-fact, direct censorship and more on the preliminary economic rationalization and verticle organization of studios and production companies as that which produces the most social impact. She poses questions about the rise and fall and ultimate ineffectiveness of 'leftist tendencies' films. She offers interesting analysis on the relation between the increase in speed and movement of bodies in 'chanbara' action films and the contemporaneous development of industrialization. Perhaps what is most fascinating in her study is her focus on the re-negotiations of gender politics as seen in popular narrative films in the context of the historical transitions from early to late 20th century society.

The peak of this book is definitely her coverage and analysis of cinema during the years of militarism and those of the occupation period. However, like any comprehensive survey of Japan's cinematic hisory that I have read, the book becomes more brief and hurried as one approaches the more contemporary era. Yet, at least she does mention and even explore (but only briefly) some of the more recent achievements. Unfortunately, I give this book 4 instead of 5 stars for this minor flaw. I'm saving my 5th star for that book that is bold enough to cover more recent ground at considerable length.

Also, one other great thing about this book (unlike some) is that every film that Standish 'reads' or analyzes at great depth is accessible to the public. I am pretty sure about this - but I could be wrong - I know that just about every film that receives attention can be accessed in some way. Blockbuster may not be a helpful resource here but amazon, libraries, and 'good' rental stores can provide that which is needed.
  • Legend 33
This was really a disappointing book. It reads like an indoctrination manual full of post-modern jargon and Marxist claptrap, just one cliche after another. It does have some information, which gives it some value, but otherwise it's just way too ideological. It could have been a much better book without that.