almediah.fr
» » The Golden Age of Crap: 77 B-Movies From the Glory Days of VHS

Download The Golden Age of Crap: 77 B-Movies From the Glory Days of VHS eBook

by Nathan Shumate

Download The Golden Age of Crap: 77 B-Movies From the Glory Days of VHS eBook
ISBN:
1452822204
Author:
Nathan Shumate
Category:
Movies
Language:
English
Publisher:
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 28, 2010)
Pages:
262 pages
EPUB book:
1597 kb
FB2 book:
1880 kb
DJVU:
1425 kb
Other formats
mbr lit mobi rtf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
328


77 B-Movies From the Glory Days of VHSJust because you can'.

77 B-Movies From the Glory Days of VHSJust because you can'. Shumate makes the claim that the golden age of crap is from the 1980s through the 1990s when the advent of VHS allowed producers of cinematic ca-ca to distribute their movies out to a wider public than the theaters would allow. This is fairly indisputable, but I feel obligated to point out that the bad films of the 60s and 70s remain unsurpassed in their ineptitude thanks to the Grindhouse theaters and the drive-ins' need to show cheap double features

Nathan Shumate is a Utah author, small-press publisher, assemblage artist and dilettante . The Golden Age of Crap Apr 28, 2010.

Nathan Shumate is a Utah author, small-press publisher, assemblage artist and dilettante (although he prefers the term "Renaissance Man"). He has written (and gotten paid for) comic books, screenplays, and various forms of fiction and non-fiction. His short stories have appeared in the magazine AMAZING STORIES, the anthology MONSTERS & MORMONS, and other venues.

Find nearly any book by Nathan Shumate. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Butler, Michael R. Collings, Robert J Defendi, Carter Reid, Nathan Shumate, Howard Tayler, Brad R. Torgersen, David J. West.

From post-apocalyptic communities to existential wastelands, from black comedy to dark absurdism, from visceral shock to Lovecraftian dread, the seventeen unsettling stories in this collection are guaranteed to ensnare your imagination.

The Golden Age of Crap: 77 B-Movies from the Glory Days of Vhs by Nathan Shumate. Ships in a business day with tracking. Not finding what you're looking for?

From post-apocalyptic communities to existential wastelands, from black comedy to dark absurdism, from visceral shock to Lovecraftian dread, the seventeen unsettling stories in this collection are guaranteed to ensnare your imagination.

The Golden Age of Comic Books describes an era of American comic books from 1938 to 1956. The superhero archetype was created and many well-known characters were introduced, including Superman, Batman, Captain Marvel, Captain America, and Wonder Woman. The first recorded use of the term "Golden Age" was by Richard A. Lupoff in an article, "Re-Birth", published in issue one of the fanzine Comic Art in April 1960.

Just because you can't respect a movie doesn't mean you can't enjoy it. The Golden Age of Crap serves up a sampling of junk-food flicks that gained their audiences on videocassette rental shelves during the '80s and '90s, a time when one couldn't visit the video rental store without being tempted by Italian post-apocalyptic adventures, ninja revenge yarns, and zombie-filled "camcorder epics." The movies covered here run from sleeper hits (Phantasm II) to cult favorites (The Dead Next Door), from unknown stinkers (Plutonium Baby) to undiscovered gems (America's Deadliest Home Video), all examined with a critical but fun-loving eye. "Nathan Shumate is a B-movie encyclopedia. I stand in awe of anyone who has seen this many films with the words 'Blood Bath,' 'Zombie,' or 'Bikini' in the title." - LARRY CORREIA, author of Monster Hunter International "This book skips the usual cult classics and highlights some real gems lost in the wreckage of '80s B-movie video stores with funny and insightful reviews. A must read for B-movie fans!"-BILL GALVAN, comic book artist for Archie Comics and Marvel Comics "Remember that dude's head exploding in Scanners? Well, that's what would happen to you if you watched more than seven of the bad B movies in Nathan Shumate's The Golden Age of Crap. But Nathan has saved you some messy head explosions by watching the films for you, and his reviews are funnier and more entertaining than all 77 of the films combined." - WILLIAM C. MARTELL, screenwriter of Hard Evidence and Crash Dive
  • Damand
Back in the glorious 980's was it a typical Friday night ritual for you to scour the horror and specification aisles of your local Blockbuster, Hollywood Video, or mom and pop cha rental store looking for something horrifying, astounding, or lurid enough to live up to its box cover? If you miss those heady days of micro-budgeted extravaganzas, this book will help you recapture some of the fun that used to be associated with trips to the video store. shipmates evaluates the films he discusses honestly and accurately but also with affection and sympathy for the difficult circumstances in which many of them were made. If you're lucky enough to live someplace that still has. Video store and don't lik letting Netflix which exploitation genre films you are able to see, this book will provide excellent guidance on which cha classics are worth revisiting and which can be left to milder in their tombs undisturbed.
  • Hucama
The Golden Age of Crap is a well written, exhaustively researched gold mine of information for anyone who has ever hosted a "Bad Movie Night" or enjoys self-abuse in video form. Nathan Shumate is a clever and insightful reviewer and his entries are fun to read. I read this book like any other, simply working through from beginning to end and laughing a lot along the way.

I quickly realized that I'd only actually seen two of the 77 movies reviewed here, despite being a child of the 80's. I'm looking forward to finding more of these selections, although the author does warn that a few of them are hard to come by these days.

Aspiring filmmakers might well find good advice here, since there are right ways and wrong ways to make a cheap movie. Among with the humorous play-by-play of all the gory details, Shumate details elements of plot, editing, and production that demonstrate good knowledge of what works and what doesn't.

If you've ever trolled the aisles of a rental store looking for something that so good it's bad, or the modern equivalent of looking for something to watch on-demand over a subscription service, you need to get this book!
  • Lost Python
Nathan Shumate's new book does a number of things, and it does them all well.

First of all, it resurrects several long-forgotten b-movie titles for discussion. Some of these, quite honestly, would not have been mourned by history had they been left in obscurity, but Mr. Shumate doesn't just review them. He uses them to illustrate many facets of film-making and story-telling, especially when the budget is lower than low. And since you're not likely to see these any time soon, why not use them to reflect on low-budget film-making in general? This makes this a first-rate guide to making low-budget movies because, while Mr. Shumate does mention technical areas now and then, his real focus is the one thing (to my mind) that must be rock-solid before a frame of film is shot: the script. His insights into the stories of these films are a gold mine of excellent advice for screenwriters. I can imagine the responses of the film-makers: one group smacks their foreheads: "Why didn't I think of that?"; another relievedly claims, "Uh, yeah, I totally meant to do that." (As a bonus, several film-makers responses to the reviews are included.)

Secondly, and most importantly, Mr. Shumate's criticism, while biting, is also fair. He manages to find the things a truly poor film does right, and he shows where a well-made effort still has flaws. The perfect movie may not have been made yet, but neither has the totally worthless one (especially as a learning experience).

Thirdly and finally, Mr. Shumate's writing is not only clear and loaded with insights, it's also frequently hilarious. So you can learn while you laugh without guilt. Highly recommended.

One slight oddity about the Kindle edition are the breaks between reviews. There are many times when the wrap-up of one review occurs on the same page as the onset of the next. Not enough to diminish the pleasure of reading the book, but perhaps a matter to be checked for the next edition.
  • Modigas
Read about ten entries. Laughed aloud several times, waking the wife. Nicely done.

I remember most of these movies, though I seem to have blocked them out. This book worked like regression therapy, bringing the crap back so I could finally deal with it after all these years. I may still require medication in the form of hard liquor.

If you like to laugh, like bad movies, like VHS, or like to laugh at bad VHS movies, pull the trigger and buy this. It's good stuff.
  • Dddasuk
This is a fun and entertaining book if you have a soft spot for horrible VHS movies from the 1980's
  • Flocton
We all know there are B-movies out there that are lacking. And I'm not going to sit here and say something like "Manos: The Hands of Fate", which is one of the weakest B horror movies I've ever seen, is even close to a classic like "The Hills Have Eyes" (1977). But I've gotten so fed up with the kind of "ironic" s*** my generation comes up with regarding "bad" low budget exploitation movies! I see s*** like this, and I can't understand why you'd go out of your way to publish something like that. If it's so "nostalgic" for you, why do you bash it? I'll just remind all the Michael Bay loving kids out there that mocking some of those classic cheesefests is like kicking a crippled puppy. For shame. F*****g punks.