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Download The Times Jumbo Cryptic Crossword Book 8: 50 Challenging Cryptic Crosswords (Bk. 8) eBook

by Collins UK

Download The Times Jumbo Cryptic Crossword Book 8: 50 Challenging Cryptic Crosswords (Bk. 8) eBook
ISBN:
0007264496
Author:
Collins UK
Category:
Puzzles & Games
Language:
English
Publisher:
HarperCollins UK (August 1, 2008)
Pages:
128 pages
EPUB book:
1192 kb
FB2 book:
1154 kb
DJVU:
1553 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
126


Start by marking The Times Jumbo Cryptic Crossword Book 8. .Designed to challenge even the most experienced crossword buff, this selection of 50 puzzles from London’s The Times put your linguistic prowess to its limit.

Start by marking The Times Jumbo Cryptic Crossword Book 8: 50 Challenging Cryptic Crosswords as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Initially published just four times a year on holidays, The Times crossword has appeared on a weekly basis since 1997.

Large-grid cryptic crosswords from the London Times The Times Jumbo Crossword Collection: Over 100 Challenging Cryptic Crosswords, The . Times Jumbo Cryptic Crosswords Series. 10 primary works, 11 total works. Large-grid cryptic crosswords from the London Times.

Large-grid cryptic crosswords from the London Times The Times Jumbo Crossword Collection: Over 100 Challenging Cryptic Crosswords, The Times Jumbo Crypti. Book 1. The Times Jumbo Crossword Collection: Over 100 Challenging Cryptic Crosswords. The Times Jumbo Crossword Collection contains 110.

Jumbo Cryptic Crossword Book No. 8 : Challenging Cryptic Crosswords. Book in the Times Jumbo Cryptic Crosswords Series).

A cryptic crossword is a crossword puzzle in which each clue is a word puzzle in and of itself

A cryptic crossword is a crossword puzzle in which each clue is a word puzzle in and of itself. Cryptic crosswords are particularly popular in the United Kingdom, where they originated, Ireland, Israel, the Netherlands, and in several Commonwealth nations, including Australia, Canada, India, Kenya, Malta, New Zealand, and South Africa. In the United States, cryptics are sometimes known as "British-style" crosswords. Compilers of cryptic crosswords are commonly called "setters" in the UK.

Designed to challenge even the most experienced crossword buff, this selection of 50 puzzles from .

Designed to challenge even the most experienced crossword buff, this selection of 50 puzzles from London’s The Times put your linguistic prowess to its limit.

The Times Cryptic Crossword Book 1: 80 of the World's Most Famous Crossword Puzzles: 2001 by HarperCollins Publishers .

The Times Cryptic Crossword Book 1: 80 of the World's Most Famous Crossword Puzzles: 2001 by HarperCollins Publishers (Paperback, 2000). The Times Cryptic Crossword Book 18 by Richard Browne (Paperback, 2014). Times Cryptic Crossword Book 12: 80 world-famous crossword puzzles by The Times Mind Games (Paperback, 2008).

The ultimate and only jumbo cryptic.

HarperCollins UK. Book Format.

British Corner Shop has partnered with the UK Government (DIT), to be an export platform for UK suppliers.

Customs services and international tracking provided. The Times Jumbo Cryptic Crossword Book 17, Games, Rogan 9780008285371 Ne.

Designed to challenge even the most experienced crossword buff, this selection of 50 puzzles from London’s The Times put your linguistic prowess to its limit. Initially published just four times a year on holidays, The Times crossword has appeared on a weekly basis since 1997. With oversized grids of 23 x 23 squares—compared to a standard 15 x 15—these puzzles require serious word power and brain bending.

  • Danial
Jerry Buchanan says: "this one has nothing to do with the standard cryptic crosswords we are used to on this side of the pond". Whoa there!

If you've tackled American cryptic crosswords, you'll actually see all the methods used in the cryptic clues that you're used to. The very first clue in the book is "Most suitable area, well-endowed (6)". Answer: ABLEST - defined by "most suitable", and also given by A=area, + BLEST = well-endowed. Nothing strange about the technique there, surely?

But you will see other things, because of the different history of cryptic crosswords in the UK - in short, a process of evolution rather than importing a puzzle style from abroad and tailoring it for a local audience. Some of the rules used in typical American cryptic crosswords have never applied to the vast majority of dialy paper puzzles in the UK. So you'll see triple defintions as well as doubles, or occasional clues where the definition is in the middle. And most different of all, you'll see cryptic definition clues, which have no wordplay. Another example from that first puzzle: "The claret circulating (11)" = BLOODSTREAM (claret being, in the UK at least, slang for blood).

There are other factors that add to the difficulty for American solvers. Obviously, there's use of British vocabulary and culture, some of which may be very baffling - especially the cricket jargon that fits in so well because names like SILLY POINT are made up of ordinary words and sometimes have other apparent meanings, and Cockney rhyming slang, which also suits cryptic xwds because the usual meanings of pairs like {butcher's=look} are completely unrelated. The other thing that you need to remember is that in the UK, you can get a crossword in this style every day of the week if you read the Times, and get far more practice at difficult cryptic clues than American solvers have the chance to. So a typical Times crossword is harder than a typical American cryptic. If these puzzles were in the style of the New York Times cryptics, lots of people would grumble because they'd find them ludicrously easy.

I write as a winner of the Times Crossword Championship who has made various attempts at New York Times (non-cryptic) puzzles over the years. After solving several hundred of them, I can do a Monday or Tuesday puzzle in something like 8-12 minutes, but slow down quite rapidly as the week goes on. Something like 38 minutes for one Friday puzzle is probably about my proudest NYT moment so far. But sometimes I have to give up when one corner has too much local stuff for me to handle. Never mind, try the next one and I might recognise ROTC or BIGD next time. Not finishing all the puzzles doesn't stoop me from admiting the skill that goes into writing these puzzles.

If you're prepared to solve in the same spirit, and invest some time and effort, these puzzles can be done by American solvers (I know some Americans who tackle them), and you will see some of the best cryptic clues available anywhere. Here's one, again from that first puzzle: "Superior companion? The most inferior (4,7)" is LAKE ONTARIO - a companion of Lake Superior as one of the Great Lakes, and the 'most inferior' as it's the one with least elevation. Needless to say, the clue doesn't have you thinking of lakes at all.

It would be an improvement to Times crossword collections if all or at least some of the answers were explained, but that's not yet the norm in cryptic xwd books over here. I hope this will change one day - it would help new British solvers too.
  • Dorintrius
I started doing cryptic crosswords when I lived in England in the early 80's. Although some of The Times clues refer to places and names in the British pantheon of nouns that none of us may have ever heard of, some are infinitely guessable, given enough letters. I have found that the more of these puzzles I knock down, the more twisted (and therefore, more savvy) my mental processes become. Admittedly, having followed this Book 8 with Book 9, I find that many of the clues in this one stretch the boundaries just a little too far. But I'm always ready for the next challenge.
  • Little Devil
The crosswords in the book are fun to tackle. Some are more difficult than others, and I think people who are very good at solving crosswords might find some of them rather easy. The book is good quality and withstands frequent use.
  • Gaua
Great item and seller.
  • Ddilonyne
I'm a great fan of cryptic crosswords. I've been working them for years. But this one has nothing to do with the standard cryptic crosswords we are used to on this side of the pond. I couldn't figure out the code. The Times refers to the London Times. Unless your are from England and are used to their style of cryptic crosswords, avoid this one.