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Download Gambiteer I: A Hard-Hitting Chess Opening Repertoire For White (Everyman Chess) eBook

by Nigel Davies

Download Gambiteer I: A Hard-Hitting Chess Opening Repertoire For White (Everyman Chess) eBook
ISBN:
1857445163
Author:
Nigel Davies
Category:
Puzzles & Games
Language:
English
Publisher:
Everyman Chess; 1st edition (May 1, 2007)
Pages:
192 pages
EPUB book:
1584 kb
FB2 book:
1340 kb
DJVU:
1178 kb
Other formats
lit lrf mobi mbr
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
200


A former British Open Quickplay Champion, Davies is the author of several successful chess books and is highly experienced in chess publishing

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). A former British Open Quickplay Champion, Davies is the author of several successful chess books and is highly experienced in chess publishing. Nigel Davies is both an experienced Grandmaster and chess trainer.

In his two-volume Gambiteer series, opening expert Nigel Davies produces a complete opening repertoire which is certainly not for the faint-hearted: uncompromising and wild attacking ideas for both colours. This first volume deals with a gambit-style approach for White; the second volume will concentrate on an ambitious black repertoire. All of the opening lines Davies advocates in this book lead to positions of open warfare, where sharp, tactical play completely dominates dreary positional subtleties. Are you ready for the battle? Then cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war! Contents.

In his two-volume Gambiteer series, opening expert Nigel Davies . A complete opening repertoire for Black A feast of bloodthirsty chess Ideal for the attack-minded player. The book for white is a complete repertoire, covering all of black's reasonable responses. Whilst the first volume dealt with a gambit-style approach for White, this second book concentrates on an ambitious Black repertoire.

All of the opening lines Davies advocates in Volume 1 lead to positions of open warfare, where sharp, tactical play . In Volume 2, Davies produces an ambitious and uncompromising repertoire for Black.

All of the opening lines Davies advocates in Volume 1 lead to positions of open warfare, where sharp, tactical play completely dominates dreary positional sacrifices. His two main choices are the Albin Counter Gambit and the Schlieman Gambit, the pick of the crop having been tried and tested by some of the World's most inventive players.

Items related to Gambiteer I: A Hard-Hitting Chess Opening Repertoire. Nigel Davies is both an experienced Grandmaster and chess trainer

Items related to Gambiteer I: A Hard-Hitting Chess Opening Repertoire. Davies, Nigel Gambiteer I: A Hard-Hitting Chess Opening Repertoire For White (Everyman Chess). ISBN 13: 9781857445169.

Paperback, 192 pages. Published May 1st 2007 by Everyman Chess.

Gambiteer I: A hard-hitting chess opening repertoire for White. In his two-volume Gambiteer series, opening expert Nigel Davies produces a complete opening repertoire which is certainly not for the feint-hearted: uncompromising and wild attacking ideas for both colours. Paperback, 192 pages. Gambiteer I: A hard-hitting chess opening repertoire for White. 1857445163 (ISBN13: 9781857445169).

Everyman Chess has started a new series aimed at those who want to understand the basics of an. .

Everyman Chess has started a new series aimed at those who want to understand the basics of an opening, . the not-yet-so-strong players. I imagine will be a long series based on the premise of bringing the basic ideas of an opening to the reader through plenty of introductory text, game annotations, hints, plans and much more.

gambiteer I a hard-hitting chess opening repertoire for White. EVERYMAN CHESS Gloucester Publishers pie ww. veryrnanchess

gambiteer I a hard-hitting chess opening repertoire for White. veryrnanchess. com First publishedin 2007 byGloucester Publishers pk (ishers pk), Northburgh House, 10 NorthburghStreet, London ECl VOAT.

Maintaining and preparing an opening repertoire is a very demanding task and requires A LOT of thought in terms of.

In this book Neil does a lot of the work for you. He reccomends lines that have stood the test of time and will NOT be refuted. And follows up with annotated model games where it goes over pitfalls for both sides and deviations from theory. A well balanced discussion to say the least.

Do you like the opening repertoire for like. It's a gambiteer series opening expert, nigel daviesis chapter produces feast. Do the classical double king pawn there that it because. Stop hitting yourselfSelf Improvement.

In his two-volume Gambiteer series, opening expert Nigel Davies produces a complete opening repertoire which is certainly not for the feint-hearted: uncompromising and wild attacking ideas for both colours. This first volume deals with a gambit-style approach for White; the second volume will concentrate on an ambitious black repertoire. All of the opening lines Davies advocates in this book lead to positions of open warfare, where sharp, tactical play completely dominates dreary positional subtleties.*A complete opening repertoire for White*A feast of blood-thirsty chess*Ideal for the attack-minded player
  • Runehammer
This book will set you up for failure in the openings. I regret having bought Gambiteer I and II and the time I have invested in them.

The line given for white in Chapter 1, for example, won't work if you play it over the board. Chapter one covers 1. e4 c5 2. b4 cxb4 3. a3 d5 4. exd5 Qxd5 5. Nf3 e5 6. axb4 Bxb4 7. c3 as the main line. 7....e4! isn't even covered and will completely bust White. Trust me, when your opponents figure this out and you will find yourself quickly in a very simplified Queenless endgame a pawn down, with doubled pawns on the F file, isolated pawns everywhere, and using all your creative resources just to try to save a draw.

I did my most thorough analysis of the flaws in Chapter 1 of Gambiteer I, so the other chapters and the other book may offer something but I doubt it. To get to the point -- after the flaws I found I just don't trust these books. More important than the concrete errors one will inevitably find in any book, the gambiteer approach provided by Davies is principally unsound.

Davies argues that being down a pawn is worth practical chances. I wholeheartedly agree with this concept. However, these lines open up far more risk for White than a pawn is worth. In the openings, you should expect to have have a position you are comfortable playing (e.g., understand the themes) and hopefully at least a small advantage. It is unreasonable to expect that you will smash your opponents out of the gate on a regular basis. Nigel Davies describes the choice of opening lines as being either his recommendations or something like the super-solid (and rather dull) London System. In fact, there is a lot in between. Nigel Davies is correct that this may give you practical chances but I would not recommend these lines against anyone Class C or above, especially if time controls provide enough time for your opponent to think.

I believe that developing opening lines for tournament play requires a significant investment in time and energy. This book won't pay off because the short-term fun will fizzle out when others learn how to deal with these lines. To contrast, spending time learning slightly more solid (yet still sacrificial and fun) lines will give you years of enjoyment. For example, the Evan's gambit is very fun, will quickly destroy an opponent who doesn't know how to deal with it, yet still gives chances against the ones that do know how to play it.

Do not give up on the idea of becoming a gambiteer! However, there are better approaches to chess openings out there that are just as fun but won't rob you of winning chances if your opponent happens to know how to play against them.
  • Samugul
For me, it has the right amount of detail. For a tournament repertoire, it's a bit thin, but to cover so many replies to 1.e4 in as much detail as required would require a tremendous amount of material. The amount of material given is enough to point the reader in the right direction, and gives plenty of ideas as to how to play the openings suggested.

In regards to the reviewer who gave this one star, it seems a bit extreme to me to reject a book of 8+ openings because of one. Just choose a different possibility if you don't like the one suggested. You don't have to incorporate every aspect of the suggested repertoire. Also the reason given for rejecting it, claiming 7... e4 "busts white", doesn't seem to fly. My computer (houdini) suggests 8.Qa4+ as a possibility, which keeps the pieces on the board, and gives White play for the pawn. It's true that white is fighting for equality, but that's true for other lines suggested as well (e.g., Houdini gives the Danish, French Wing give similar small edges for Black) In order to cover every possibility, the book would have to be many times larger than it is.

If you're playing a gambit repertoire, presumably you're looking for something which is fun to play, and gives good practical chances for the pawn. The repertoire succeeds in what it set out to do. Also, and the reason I gave this 5 pawns, the book is fun to read. Many opening books are too much like work to slog through. IMO chess books should be fun to read.
  • Tygrarad
If you're looking for lines to take to tournaments and improve your playing, this isn't the repertoire for you.

If you're looking to buy some beers and play some blitz this book pays for itself in entertainment value.

I'm a die-hard 1.c4 player and love positional games, but the second blitz starts between rounds I'm pulling out my gambits and letting pieces fly. A line or two is unsound? Who cares! Just throw another pawn out or move on to the next game. Playing these openings for fun made my "serious" playing more well-rounded as an added bonus.
  • Tam
This book presents a very strong and up to date treatment of the chess gambits from White's point of view. I am impressed by the selection of the openings covered as well as the somewhat unorthodox choices: for instance, in the classical double king pawn gambits, the author recommends the Danish Gambit instead of, for instance, the King's Gambit (which is substantially more studied and would be much less of an opening surprise). There are very few analytical mistakes here and most of the lines are very playable for the white player. A few errors in the deep analysis but mostly a great starting place for the White 1.e4 player.