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Download Mrs. Harris: The Death of the Scarsdale Diet Doctor eBook

by Diana Trilling

Download Mrs. Harris: The Death of the Scarsdale Diet Doctor eBook
ISBN:
0151769028
Author:
Diana Trilling
Category:
Rules & Procedures
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harcourt; 1st edition (October 1, 1981)
Pages:
341 pages
EPUB book:
1680 kb
FB2 book:
1594 kb
DJVU:
1622 kb
Other formats
lrf doc lit mobi
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
145


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New York : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on February 8, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Diane Trilling's book about the "Diet Doc" murder is engrossing and informative. She really has a great understanding of the appalling relationship of Herman Tarnower and Jean Harris. Both Tarnower and Harris are depicted as they really were: a pair of unlikeable, emotionally crippled snobs who deserved each other.

An examination of the historical roots of contemporary criminal justice in the . based on vast experience and deep knowledge of the legal system, and its often-devastating consequences for citizens and communities of color. Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, by Matthew Desmond (Crown). Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS, by Joby Warrick (Doubleday)

The writer Shana Alexander and the critic Diana Trilling both wrote popular books about Mrs. Harris’s experience.

On Feb. 24, 1981, after eight days of deliberation, the jury of four men and eight women decided that she had murdered the doctor. The writer Shana Alexander and the critic Diana Trilling both wrote popular books about Mrs. Mrs. Trilling compared Mrs. Harris to Anna Karenina and Emma Bovary; Mrs. Harris, she said, was material asking to be written but with no one to write her.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780140063639.

Diana Trilling, née Diana Rubin, was an American literary critic and author, a member of the circle of writers, thinkers and polemicists of the 1930's, 40's and 50's known as the "New York intellectuals". She was married to foremost US literary and cultural critic Lionel Trilling. They had one child, James.

Home Trilling, Diana Mrs. Harris: The Death of. .Signed by Trilling on the front flyleaf We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the Abebooks web sites

Home Trilling, Diana Mrs. Harris: The Death of the Scarsdale Diet Doctor. Signed by Trilling on the front flyleaf. A short prior owner gift inscription, dated 1981, is above the author's signature. Dust jacket is bright and clean with light handling edges and two short closed tears top edge rear panel. We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the Abebooks web sites.

Throughout her life, Diana Trilling (1905-1996) wrote about profound social changes with candor and wisdom, first .

She went on to publish five books, including the best-selling Mrs. Harris: The Death of the Scarsdale Diet Doctor, written when she was in her late seventies. She was also one half of one of the most famous intellectual couples in the United States.

Provides a detailed look at the Herman Tarnower murder trial and the former headmistress convicted of that crime
  • iSlate
As a reader of true crime, I enjoyed this book. Usually, I don't like the long, tedious court-room part
of these tomes, but this author was different. She was so interested in the character of Mrs. Harris,
that I found it fascinating. Even the court room part, she handled well -- and expedited what could
have been where I cut off. I really appreciate the background of the "players" and their emotional
components -- and this book delivered!!
  • Gnng
This book provides greater insight into the Jean Harris and Herman Tarnower story. It explains Jean Harris as clearly as you are likely to get. A great companion to Shana Alexander's Very Much A Lady.
  • TheJonnyTest
I went to Jean Harris's high school, she remains the most well known if not notorious alum who ever attended. A sensational case that there ever was, Jean Harris brought to light many issues having to do with relationships, our legal system, celebrity, and a clashing of old school Victorian values and the new school liberated ones. It's also a character study on Jean Harris and Herman Tarnower, who were both very successful yet two deeply flawed people.

Jean Harris was the head mistress of a girls' boarding school in Virginia and had a lot of things on her plate. Some students at the school were caught smoking pot. While today (and in 1980 at the time of the events), we would excuse this as simply "something that kids do to be bad", Jean was faced with a dilemma whether to allow the girls to remain at Madeira School. When she opted for them to be expelled for it, the entire campus was in an uproar. She had angry students, angry parents and faculty screaming at her for her decision. Coupled with that, her long time boyfriend, Herman Tarnower, a cardiologist preparing to publish his book, The Scarsdale Diet, nowadays a precursor to The Atkins Diet, informed her that she would not be sitting at the head table at an upcoming banquet in his honer and would be off to the side with other friends. The other friends included Lynn Tryfornos, the receptionist at his medical practice who he had also been carrying on an affair with. Plus the prescription speed she had been taking for years that Tarnower had prescribed for her to keep up with the demands of her schedule had run out and she was going through withdrawl. She was falling apart very quickly. She seemed to focus all of her anger about Tarnower's infidelity on Tryfornos when she was not the only woman he was cheating with, fearing loosing him to her and her alone. She then sat down and wrote a long rambling letter to Tarnower which she would send registered mail as her suicide letter, but would be read aloud in court to condemn her. It was then on a March night in 1980 that she decided she was going to commit suicide in Tarnower's backyard. She said she went into his bedroom, hoping to have some final words with him before she actually did it, when it all went wrong. A struggle ensued, and Jean ended up shooting and killing Tarnower accidentally.

Many came down on Jean for her actions and how she approached it. She was embarrassed of what happened for a variety of reasons and ended up having her dirty laundry aired publicly. No one wants to be in a position like this. And yet, she ended up in this position like many women who go to prison for the same reasons: drugs and a man. Instead of coping a plea to have her sentence reduced, she refused to cooperate and ended up behind bars for far longer than most women who end up in similar situations. Jean was lucky that she was able to take a bad situation and make something of herself, continuing her education career while behind bars teaching parenting classes and helping other women inmates get their GEDs. She was also lucky that she had friends and family come to see her and accept her phone calls when so many other women who go to prison are left alone. She saw her prison sentence as making lemonade out of lemons, of which she had no choice in the matter to do so. And yet, she had a lot of time to sit and face her demons like so many who did a bad thing.
  • Zyangup
Diane Trilling's book about the "Diet Doc" murder is engrossing and informative. She really has a great understanding of the appalling relationship of Herman Tarnower and Jean Harris. Both Tarnower and Harris are depicted as they really were: a pair of unlikeable, emotionally crippled snobs who deserved each other.

Trilling also gives the reader a great view of the trial, the testimony, the witnesses and Harris's disastrous testimony. Her time on the stand really showed her for what she was: a snotty, scornful, spiteful woman who had no idea what the truth was, a woman steeped in self-pity and bitterness and rage. After listening to her no doubt the jury thought: "yep...she MURDERED him."

Apparently, Harris was VERY angry (she was ALWAYS angry, prone to rages and fits of temper, even without the speed that Tarnower prescribed for her) at Trilling for the way she was portrayed in Trilling's book. In Harris's self-serving memoir, "Stranger in Two Worlds" Harris calls Trilling "senile!" Trilling was a woman of superior intellect; she was NOT senile, not by a long shot.

Anyone interested in this case should read this book. It's truthful and unbiased and very interesting to read. Trilling tells the TRUTH about Jean Harris.