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by Hammond Innes

Download Atlantic Fury eBook
ISBN:
0006134254
Author:
Hammond Innes
Category:
Action & Adventure
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fontana; reprint edition (1974)
Pages:
255 pages
EPUB book:
1975 kb
FB2 book:
1714 kb
DJVU:
1826 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
382


For Janet and Maurice. who have painted and fished the Hebrides. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

For Janet and Maurice. Those who are familiar with the out-islands of the Hebrides will have no difficulty in recognising Laerg, just as those who have served in the Western Isles will appreciate at once the extent to which I am in the Army’s debt for their co-operation. However, in a work of fiction intended to give a picture of the conditions that face men serving in an unusual environment, certain liberties are inevitable. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Hammond Innes was a good, but not great, writer of adventure stories that often centered on exotic or unusual . Atlantic Fury's strength as a novel is the location and Innes' descriptions. The military sends LSTs to retrieve the personnel and equipment

Hammond Innes was a good, but not great, writer of adventure stories that often centered on exotic or unusual locales. The military sends LSTs to retrieve the personnel and equipment. But LSTs are not designed to cross 40 miles of open ocean even in good conditions, and when conditions deteriorate, in St Kilda they deteriorate particularly badly. The only landing site for craft can only be used when the wind is in the right direction, and when the wind veers everything goes wrong.

Open Road Media, 15 нояб. Innes served in the Royal Artillery in World War II, eventually rising to the rank of major. A number of his books were published during the war, including Wreckers Must Breathe (1940), The Trojan Horse (1940), and Attack Alarm (1941), which was based on his experiences as an anti-aircraft gunner during the Battle of Britain. Following his demobilization in 1946, Innes worked full-time as a writer, achieving a number of early successes

I love these older books. Sep 18, 2012 Simon Mcleish rated it liked it.

I love these older books.

As to the effect of a mental or moral shock on a common mind that is quite a legitimate subject for study and description.

Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Innes, Hammond; My name’s Ed Lane. Are you by any chance related to a Sergeant Iain Alasdair Ross reported lost when the Duart Castle was torpedoed in February, 1944?’. He was?’ vaguely American accent. Didn’t expect to strike it that fast – you’re only the fifth Ross I’ve telephoned. I’ll be with you inside of an hour. And he’d rung off, leaving me wondering what in the world it was all about

by. Innes, Hammond, 1913-1998. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

by. Uploaded by PhanS on December 17, 2010.

But a curious mission takes his brother Donald to the Hebrides to meet a Major Braddock, and he finds the man who was once his brother living a new life in a dead mans name.

During the war, Iain Ross had been disgraced, and then drowned at sea or so his family believed. But a curious mission takes his brother Donald to the Hebrides to meet a Major Braddock, and he finds the man who was once his brother living a new life in a dead mans name. Braddock is running the evacuation of the army base on the remote, gale-swept island of Laerg. Winter is closing in, and he has his own reasons for wanting the army and Donald Ross off Laerg as quickly as possible, even in the face of a furious storm building out in the Atlantic.
  • crazy mashine
Struggle to survive against the sea is a matter of courage and chance. Innes weaves the story around a British army unit ordered to evacuate from a remote island of the Hebrides during a roaring storm. The characters are well drawn and the command structure of the army unit is convincing. A very exciting yarn!
  • Brol
Fast- paced plot, beautifully observed detail of Hebridean setting, ships, meteorology, army drill... Credible and exciting.
  • Meri
great story by a great author!
  • elegant stranger
How can I express in words what I feel about this book. This is where it all began for me. I was just a rebellious teenager that hated reading when the paperback version of this book was first released. You see, I had this one old aunt that was sure that I'd like reading if I just tried it! She bought me a copy of this book and to be quite honest the only reason I started reading it was that the cover art was eye-catching. Within the hour I was irrevocably hooked for life. Somehow the way Mr. Innes transported me at his will to such a forbidding location and dangled me on a thread while I waited for the book to climax changed my way of thinking. Prior to reading this book movies were my mainstay. Plays were ok so long as they provided some precious time out of school. Books - Nah. But that changed at Mr. Innes' hand. This all happened somewhere in the 1970's. I've been an avid reader ever since that day with no way of knowing how many books I've read since then. Does it really matter how many we read or isn't it just more important (and comforting) to know that there are always more books on the horizon than there are behind us? If you're a book lover, you'll understand.
A note on my rating: I gave the book only 4 stars. To be quite honest I wanted to give it a strong 4.5 but there is no such rating available. The only reason I strayed from that elusive 5-star rating is that just last year I listened to this book on audiocassette and it was a little less exciting than I remembered. Perhaps I wanted too much from the book the second time around, who knows? But, and hear me clearly on this please, this book is a winner for sure. The action is great. The characters are believable. The plot is well thought out for such a small book (now I read mostly 1000+ page novels so this book suddenly seems a tad small in my eyes).
Oh, go enjoy it. I for one am sure you won't be disappointed. And, if you like this work, try "The Land God Gave to Cain", "The Doomed Oasis", "The Wreck of the Mary Deare", and anything else Mr. Innes penned (but those in particular are the cream of the crop to be sure).
Aunt Margaret, in spite of all those tough years when we didn't see eye to eye as often as we both would have liked, for this one thing above all the many blessings you've betowed, I owe you big time.
  • The Apotheoses of Lacspor
The book is fiction but the island, Laerg, is similar to an island in the Outer Hebrides which was evacuated in 1930. See the interesting article in Wikipedia entitled St. Kilko. The narrator learns his brother, supposedly dead long ago, has a different name and is in the British military and is involved in evacuating a defense facility from Laerg. The book is hugely concerned with the fierce October weather and builds to an exciting time in the carefully plotted story, which I came to appreciate more and more as I read it. Lots of technical weather and navigational language but well worh reading, with an ending I appreicated.
  • Siatanni
Hammond Innes was a good, but not great, writer of adventure stories that often centered on exotic or unusual locales. His works range from 2 to 4 stars, the best being Atlantic Fury, Killer Mine, and Golden Soak. (see also my review of Killer Mine). Atlantic Fury is about the evacuation, done too late in the season, of the island Laerg, which Innes based on Hirta in the St Kilda group of Hebridean outliers (beyond the Outer Hebrides).

St Kilda is a bleak inhospitable small group of islands 40 miles west of the Outer Hebrides. Cliffs up to 1400 feet high plunge into the surf--these cliffs are home to half a million seabirds--it's one of the world's prime nature treasures. There are no good landing sites, no trees--Hirta can be reached on in good weather by helicopter or small boat. Most of the other islands in the group are pinnacles that are dangerous to land on even at the best of times (one small group of Hirta inhabitants 100 years ago were dropped on a pinnacle to collect bird eggs, and it took many months before conditions were good enough to retrieve the group). The few remaining inhabitants were evacuated in 1930, and Hirta was reoccupied by the military in 1957 for a radar station. The novel describes a reevacuation by the military in about 1960.

Atlantic Fury's strength as a novel is the location and Innes' descriptions. The military sends LSTs to retrieve the personnel and equipment. But LSTs are not designed to cross 40 miles of open ocean even in good conditions, and when conditions deteriorate, in St Kilda they deteriorate particularly badly. The only landing site for craft can only be used when the wind is in the right direction, and when the wind veers everything goes wrong.

This novel introduced me to St Kilda about 40 years ago, and I've retained my interest in that place. For a sense of the setting for Atlantic Fury, do a Google search on St Kilda. Amazon also has David Quine's superb St Kilda, with maps and wonderful color photos.
  • Vuzahn
Hammond Innes is known as a writer of adventure stories, and this book about a huge storm in the north Atlantic (near the Hebrides) is one of the best books I've read about a storm at sea. I have always been fascinated with books about the sea and the dangers that are there, so this book was wonderful for me. Innes also writes about an old mystery that has come back to haunt some of the people that are trying to make a landing to save people stranded on the island of Laerg. Hammond's descriptions of the Atlantic Ocean, the storm as it builds and the scenery on the island are wonderful, and the tension that builds with each page kept me turning pages. The meterological descriptions were also very interesting, since I have a fascination for extreme weather. I really enjoyed this book.