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Download Tragedy of the Korosko eBook

by Arthur Conan Sir Doyle

Download Tragedy of the Korosko eBook
ISBN:
0719503817
Author:
Arthur Conan Sir Doyle
Category:
Action & Adventure
Language:
English
Publisher:
Transatlantic Arts; Uniform edition edition (November 1, 1995)
EPUB book:
1133 kb
FB2 book:
1422 kb
DJVU:
1458 kb
Other formats
lrf lit txt mbr
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
543


Books Should Be Free is now Loyal Books Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads. The public may possibly wonder why it is that they have never heard in the papers of the fate of the passengers of the Korosko

Books Should Be Free is now Loyal Books Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads. The Tragedy of the Korosko. By: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930). The public may possibly wonder why it is that they have never heard in the papers of the fate of the passengers of the Korosko. In these days of universal press agencies, responsive to the slightest stimulus, it may well seem incredible that an international incident of such importance should remain so long unchronicled. Suffice it that there were very valid reasons, both of a personal and of a political nature, for holding it back.

Arthur Conan Doyle's explanations of the situation and his analyses of the methods and motivations of the bandits . Another iPhone Serial app book

Arthur Conan Doyle's explanations of the situation and his analyses of the methods and motivations of the bandits and of the others involved is relevant to a great many difficulties people are facing worldwide today. This short story could be read and appreciated by millions, but it never will be due to moral cowardice and that scab on our culture Very good short adventure story. Another iPhone Serial app book. I think this is maybe my first Sir Arthur Conan Doyle book (& it's not your typical one, which would involve Sherlock Holmes-will have to try one of those someday).

Conan Doyle inserts his pleasant British humor and develops each of the characters at a level of detail which goes . That's not a bad thing, especially in the hands of a writer like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who knew his trade.

Conan Doyle inserts his pleasant British humor and develops each of the characters at a level of detail which goes beyond what he does in most other of his writings. I thoroughly enjoyed both the narrative and the precise writing style used by the author. The plot won't surprise you: a group of European tourists (inexplicably) take a boat trip up the Nile and are taken prisoner by Muslim raiders of the Khalifa's army in the Sudan. Will the jihadis kill them if they refuse to convert to Islam?

The Tragedy of the Korosko is a novel written by Arthur Conan Doyle first published in The Strand Magazine from may to december 1897. The story is about a group of european tourists travelling on the Nile (Egypt) on a boat named "Korosko".

The Tragedy of the Korosko is a novel written by Arthur Conan Doyle first published in The Strand Magazine from may to december 1897. The novel has been adapted as a play in 1909 (The Fires of Fate), then in silent film in 1923 (Fires of Fate by Tom Terriss), and with sound in 1932 (Fires of Fate by Norman Walker).

Doyle's Riveting Psychological Thriller The Tragedy of The Korosko is the smallest of Conan Doyle's historical novels; but it is perhaps his most intense. Ten tourists from England, Ireland, America and France-six men and four women-are on a vacation trip down the Nile in 1895. Doyle's Riveting Psychological Thriller The Tragedy of The Korosko is the smallest of Conan Doyle's historical novels; but it is perhaps his most intense.

Most readers know Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as the creator of Sherlock Holmes, the rational detective who epitomized deductive logic

Most readers know Sir Arthur Conan Doyle as the creator of Sherlock Holmes, the rational detective who epitomized deductive logic. Who could have guessed that Doyle also wrote some of the most wildly imaginative tales of horror and supernatural published. The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Short Stories. by Arthur Conan Doyle · Leslie S. Klinger. Indisputably the greatest fiction detective of all time, Sherlock Holmes lives on-in films, on television, and, of course, through Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's inimitable craft. These 22 stories show Holmes at his brilliant Why are th. The Hound of the Baskervilles & The Valley of Fear.

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British writer, who created the character Sherlock Holmes

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British writer, who created the character Sherlock Holmes. Originally a physician, in 1887 he published A Study in Scarlet, the first of four novels and more than fifty short stories about Holmes and Dr. Watson. The Sherlock Holmes stories are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction.

M4B audio book (140mb). Download cover art Download CD case insert. Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle was a British author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, historical novels, plays and romances, poetry, and non-fiction. Plot Summary: A group of European and American tourists is enjoying its trip in Egypt in the year 1895.

A disparate group of Western tourists collect aboard the Nile steamer Korosko, anticipating a trip filled with sightseeing and civilised colonial pleasures. But when, during a morning excursion in the desert, they are kidnapped by a group of dervish camel-men, their relationships, their beliefs and their very survival are placed in jeopardy.
  • Defolosk
I rate very few books as 5; but this is a very high 4. The book is not typical of any other Conan Doyle novel I have read. There is no principal character; it is an ensemble cast. In February 1895 a group of European and American tourists begin a river trip up the Nile in the Korosko, a stern-wheeler steam boat. While visiting a well-know tourist site several miles from the river, they are attacked and abducted by a band of Dervish, Muslim warriors. The novel describes in detail their several days of captivity and the physical and psychological pain, growth, and bonding of the group. There is much in the novel that seems prescient for the time, and many scenes are easily related to news of the middle east today. Conan Doyle inserts his pleasant British humor and develops each of the characters at a level of detail which goes beyond what he does in most other of his writings. I thoroughly enjoyed both the narrative and the precise writing style used by the author. "It is they!" The Irish gentlewoman says excitedly, in precise and grammatically correct English that sounds quaint, and almost wrong, to the modern ear. This is an excellent late Victorian novel based on current news of its day that resonates with the current news of today. Read it. You are likely to enjoy it.
  • Nothing personal
Conan Doyle displays excellent craftsmanship in developing this story. If you ever wanted to understand what true craftsmanship looks like on the written page you could search far and wide and be unlikely to discover a better example than The Tragedy of the Korosko. Conan Doyle tells his story in clear, basic English prose, he has his characters say interesting things to move the plot along and describe events as they unfold. Never losing sight of the reader's mind's-eye he is always able to keep the story sharply in focus. There is rare skill at work here. Anyone wishing to understand how it is that a great writer can take a simple tale and expand it into a full-fledged adventure yarn should take the time to read this book. No literature course good provide a better example of the "writer's touch" in telling a story than this book. Conan Doyle doesn't distract his readers with partially developed, two dimensional characters, he breathes full life into every character in the story. Giving each and every character a presence and texture that fills the story out with detail no matter how minor a role they have. This is an extremely well written story.

Now, as to the plot; Band of fanatic islamic extremists kidnap foreign travelers; where have I heard that tale before? Written in 1898 this story probably read like it came from the newspaper headlines of the day. For that matter, it reads in many respects like it was drawn from current events. On the other hand, anyone reading this story 40 or 50 years ago would probably scoff at the idea of a band of radical islamic extremists willing to risk their lives to take hostage a party of Western tourists. In today's World, no one would think anything unusual about it. Strange how history seems to keep repeating itself.

Then there is the substance of the story itself. At it's heart this is a study of individual and collective character in crisis. Each character's personality is defined, and redefined, in the course of this tale. Making the interaction between the characters, and, the impact of events on each individual's personality, and of the group collectively, the defining theme of this story. Will they be rescued? Who will live and who will die? Will they succumb to the pressure to convert to Islam to save their lives? These and many other questions are raised in the course of this story, how they are resolved is in the telling of the tale.

No need to worry about ransoming your copy, it is available for free on Kindle.
  • Yggdi
Light stuff but worth reading. I'm happy I spent my time with this (I read the free Kindle version) rather than anything I might have picked up from the paperback bestseller rack at the grocery store. I don't suffer from Western self-loathing, nor do I have any trouble recognizing the good side of Victoria's British Empire, so I enjoyed the action, the dialog, and the satisfying finish you expect in this sort of thing. This is a standard-model Victorian adventure melodrama. That's not a bad thing, especially in the hands of a writer like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who knew his trade.

The plot won't surprise you: a group of European tourists (inexplicably) take a boat trip up the Nile and are taken prisoner by Muslim raiders of the Khalifa's army in the Sudan. Will the jihadis kill them if they refuse to convert to Islam? Will the jihadis kill them regardless? What will happen to the women? Can a rescue force reach them before they get to Khartoum and will it even be strong enough if it does catch up? The tension just keeps building! Lots of fun.

Doyle doesn't specify the year the action takes place but he first published the story in serialized form for the Strand Magazine in 1897. The British were still fighting the Sudan Campaign so this would have seemed like an adventure `ripped from the headlines'. The characters are the usual. There's the retired British colonel, the parson, the lawyer, the Irish couple, a spinster from Boston travelling with her beautiful young niece, etc. There's even a Frenchman around to bitch about British imperialism. The Frenchman sounds like your average Western academic of today, and probably the only difference between the jihadis in this story and the modern ones in the Sudan is that today's jihadis have automatic rifles. It's a shame the one thing that's changed is that today they don't seem to make Englishmen like they used to.

If Sherlock Holmes is the only thing you've read by Doyle, spend a couple hours with this.
  • Lestony
Timeless topic
Even though late 19th century the topics included resonate today. It is well worth reading so get it and enjoy.
  • Rollers from Abdun
Read by Mark Steyn for his club members it is an unbelievably relevant read for today's world.
  • Braswyn
Yet another almost unreadable knockoff of a Conan Doyle story that has lapsed into the public domain. Get a used paperback or Kindle it.