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Download The Metamorphosis eBook

by Franz Kafka

Download The Metamorphosis eBook
ISBN:
1936594005
Author:
Franz Kafka
Category:
Classics
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tribeca Books (October 17, 2010)
Pages:
76 pages
EPUB book:
1587 kb
FB2 book:
1832 kb
DJVU:
1570 kb
Other formats
lrf mobi txt lit
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
525


FREE shipping on qualifying offers

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The Metamorphosis is threaded with universal themes.

Metamorphosis and Other Stories. Translated with an Introduction

Metamorphosis and Other Stories. Translated with an Introduction. Published by the Penguin Group. Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORAL, England. Except in the United States of America, this book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, re-sold, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition including this condition.

The Metamorphosis (German: Die Verwandlung) is a novella written by Franz Kafka which was first published in 1915. One of Kafka's best-known works, The Metamorphosis tells the story of salesman Gregor Samsa who wakes one morning to find himself. One of Kafka's best-known works, The Metamorphosis tells the story of salesman Gregor Samsa who wakes one morning to find himself inexplicably transformed into a huge insect (German ungeheures Ungeziefer, literally "monstrous vermin"), subsequently struggling to adjust to this new condition.

Free eBooks at Planet eBook. By Franz Kafka (1915). Download free eBooks of classic literature, books and novels at Planet eBook. This text is a translation from the German by Ian Johnston, Malaspina University-College Nanaimo, BC. It has been prepared for students in the Liberal Studies and English departments. Other traveling salesmen live like ha-rem women.

So begins The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka’s 1915 novella of angst par excellence, in which a travelling salesman struggles to adapt to his horrific new identity against the backdrop of his middle-class family’s repulsion – although.

So begins The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka’s 1915 novella of angst par excellence, in which a travelling salesman struggles to adapt to his horrific new identity against the backdrop of his middle-class family’s repulsion – although depending upon which translation you happen to be reading, poor old Gregor could be waking up to find himself transformed into anything from a giant bu.

The Metamorphosis book. This Kafka tale is, in some important ways, the forerunner of such books as ‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’ by Dale Carnegie

The Metamorphosis book. This Kafka tale is, in some important ways, the forerunner of such books as ‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’ by Dale Carnegie.

I think Kafka wanted us to see Gregor’s new body with the same hazy focus with which Gregor himself sees i. This essay is adapted from the afterword to the author’s new translation of The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka

I think Kafka wanted us to see Gregor’s new body with the same hazy focus with which Gregor himself sees i. This essay is adapted from the afterword to the author’s new translation of The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka. Kafka’s celebrated novella The Metamorphosis (Die Verwandlung) was written a century ago, in late 1912, during a period in which he was having difficulty making progress on his first novel. On November 17, 1912, Kafka wrote to his fiancée Felice Bauer that he was working on a story that came to me in my misery lying in bed and now was haunting him.

Translation by Ian Johnston. One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bug. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, just about ready to slide off completely, could hardly stay in place

Often cited as one of the most influential works of short fiction of the 20th century, Metamorphosis is widely studied in colleges and universities across the western world. Nobel Peace Prize winner Elias Canetti described it as "one of the few great and perfect works of the poetic imagination written..."
  • Coron
Kafka's The Trial is a tough book to read, perhaps because so much of what he wrote about seems plausible today. Secret decisions in which the primary person is not informed (think about some of the digital monitoring that goes on), trials that are unaccessible, and the insidious effect on one's social circles where the shadow of a trial quickly becomes known among many, but there is no recourse or ability to deny anything. And yet, with a modern eye, I also saw so many instances of Josef K's own arrogance and blindness to his own shortcomings. He makes speeches when he might have the chance to listen. He sexually assaults (kissing her extensively without her permission) a young woman in the same boarding house and then is clueless about why she's avoiding him. And when the two officers who originally arrested him are being beaten in a room in his Bank building, he does not try to assist them by calling to someone else but appears to simply hope that they are not heard by anyone else in the building. And yet his reactions are understandable, and perhaps quite typical even today of how someone might act. It's a scary book, not because of any fantastic monsters, but because of the way a government with no accountability can corrupt all citizens under fear and secrecy.
  • Katius
This publication is a joke. Someone downloaded Kafka's (out of copyright) work, put it into Microsoft Word - chose the smallest, most obnoxious sans serif font to save paper and sold it through Amazon. It's completely illegible. Pay a little more for a legitimate copy and enjoy this great work.
  • Gavirgas
This is a well-translated, very portable version of a truly extraordinary book. If you're looking for the most affordable version of The Metamorphosis, this is the best fit I've found! It's clear and engaging, and has slightly simpler vocabulary than many. This means it would be great for a classroom setting or as a gift for a younger reader, a current English learner, or anyone who doesn't enjoy being sent to the dictionary when they're trying to enjoy a book. The story itself is fresh as ever--while this isn't personally my favorite of Kafka's work, I love the absurdism and the economy of language that he employs within it! I was very pleased with the binding quality as well, and there are several amusing graphics inside the book that made it just that bit more fun to read. The biggest selling point for me personally was the size-- I'm a pack rat, so it is often difficult to find books that will fit wherever I need them to. This has made a wonderful addition to my commute this week, for the price of a Starbucks order or a single decent sock. You can't go wrong!
  • Akisame
This was a very unique read! I enjoyed it very much. I decided to actually listen to the audio version after I read it, just to see if I would “rethink” my opinions and thoughts about the book. Then, I was so intrigued, I did some internet searches and started reading about other interpretations readers have made. I couldn’t get enough, I even went so far as to YouTube videos and feature length films dedicated to this short tale! Those proved to be quite interesting and entertaining. I would definitely recommend this book!
  • Dominator
This book is an abrupt short story that is engaging from start to finish. The story is surreal yet the main character Gregor is completely relatable. The story starts out as funny, but grows sadder and sadder until the ending, which admittedly is strange enough to be the ending of a Sundance film. Honestly, if this book had come out a few years later it could've been an artistic surrealist cartoon. This is one of those speculative frictions that doesn't actually explain why something is happening, only that it is. Franz Kafka explains how turning into a roach would affect Gregor in a way that is understandable, sympathetic, yet well researched. It feels like the story is an allegory for something, yet is so dedicated to its premise that it's difficult to say what the allegory is. Overall, I would recommend this story for those that like the modern abrupt method of storytelling, who like strangeness, and who like to cry. Seriously, this one is depressing despite it's moments of levity.
  • Ynap
The Metamorphosis is one of those books that you either read in high school or you never read at all. I heard so many people talking about The Metamorphosis and I thought that I wouldn't ever read the book and all of the puns, allusions and themes discussed between friends would just go over my head for the rest of my life. I finally decided to give the book a shot. I was quite surprised by how short the book is, and yet how relateable it is to my current life expectations and experience. The Metamorphosis is a book I would suggest to everyone to read. As I make my way from college to "being an adult" the concept discussed in the first part of the book I found to be the most relevant. Kafka discusses having a job and the expectations of having a job. That one can waste away their life at a company (or with people) that do not value you as a human being can do significant harm to your being. Anyways, great book, I'm happy I decided to read it. Also to not, I really enjoyed the print size and font of the book.