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by Stephen R. Pastore,Emile Zola

Download The Sin of Father Mouret eBook
ISBN:
1937727173
Author:
Stephen R. Pastore,Emile Zola
Category:
Classics
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Emile Zola Society (March 30, 2012)
Pages:
330 pages
EPUB book:
1288 kb
FB2 book:
1938 kb
DJVU:
1477 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
489


Stephen R. Pastore is an avid book collector and literary scholar.

The inbred villagers do not care for Mouret, and he is forced to contemplate religious affairs and the extent of his faith. Eventually he has a complete nervous breakdown and collapses into a near-comatose state, whereupon suffering from amnesia and total long-term memory loss, with no idea who or where he is beyond his first name, he falls for and uneducated girl who has been left to grow up practically alone. Stephen R. He is the author of "Never on these Shores

mile Zola, Stephen R. Pastore (Introduction). This second book has the feeling of being filled with excerpts from Zola’s practice notebook of expressive writing.

mile Zola, Stephen R. The inbred villagers do not care for Mouret, and he is forced to contemplate religious affairs and the extent of his faith. His overwhelming use of metaphors had me hating the word like by the beginning of the climatic third book.

Emile Zola, Stephen R Pastore.

La Faute de l'Abbé Mouret (1875) is the fifth novel in Émile Zola's twenty-volume series Les Rougon-Macquart. Viciously anticlerical in tone, it follows on from the horrific events at the end of La Conquête de Plassans, focussing this time on a remote Provençal backwater village

series Oxford World's Classics. Books related to The Sin of Abbé Mouret.

series Oxford World's Classics. Zola memorably shows their gradual awakening to sexuality, and his poetic descriptions of the luxuriant and beautiful Paradou create a lyrical celebration of Nature. When Serge regains his memory and recalls his priestly vows, anguish inevitably follows. The whole story, with its numerous biblical parallels, becomes a poetic reworking of the Fall of Man and a questioning of the very meaning of innocence and sin. Zola explores the conflict between Church and Nature, the sterility of the Church and the fertility of Nature.

Stephen R. Pastore is one of the leading Zola scholars in the world; he has led the way in introducing Zola to the American reading public. Stephen Pastore is a retired attorney and entrepreneur. Born in New York City in 1946, he became the first American elected to the prestigious Council of Management of The Thomas Hardy Society (UK) where he lectured and wrote on the works of Thomas Hardy throughout Britain.

Other articles where The Sin of Father Mouret is discussed: French literature: Zola. aute de l’abbé Mouret (1875; The Sin . Britannica does not currently have an article on this topic. Alternative Title: La Faute de l’abbé Mouret. Learn about this topic in these articles: French literature. aute de l’abbé Mouret (1875; The Sin of Father Mouret). As the cycle progresses, the sense of a doomed society rushing toward the apocalypse grows, to be confirmed in Zola’s penultimate novel, on the Franco-German War, La Débâcle (1892; The Debacle). In French literature: Zola. Faute de l’abbé Mouret (1875; The Sin of Father Mouret ).

The Demise of Father Mouret (French: La Faute de l'Abbé Mouret, "The Mistake of Father Mouret") is a 1970 French film directed by Georges Franju, based on the 1875 novel La Faute de l'Abbé Mouret by Émile Zola

The Demise of Father Mouret (French: La Faute de l'Abbé Mouret, "The Mistake of Father Mouret") is a 1970 French film directed by Georges Franju, based on the 1875 novel La Faute de l'Abbé Mouret by Émile Zola. Like the novel, the film is about Father Mouret, a young priest (played by Francis Huster) who is sent to a remote village in Provence, then has a nervous breakdown and develops amnesia.

Emile Zola, one of the most famous French writers of all time, was a very important contributor to the Naturalist movement. He also led an active political life, which is reflected in some of his works. His novels are infused with realism, as he wanted to create accurate portrayals of what life was like at the time. Below we have compiled a list of the best books by Zola you should read. Germinal, Emile Zola Penguin Classics. Germinal is the 13th novel in Zola’s collection of Les Rougon-Macquart, a set of books that he grouped together, creating blood ties between some of the.

Zola's classic novel about young priest Serge Mouret as he takes his orders and becomes the parish priest for the disinterested village of Artauds. The inbred villagers do not care for Mouret, and he is forced to contemplate religious affairs and the extent of his faith. Eventually he has a complete nervous breakdown and collapses into a near-comatose state, whereupon suffering from amnesia and total long-term memory loss, with no idea who or where he is beyond his first name, he falls for and uneducated girl who has been left to grow up practically alone. As with most Zola novels, heartache and despair are the driving forces behind Mouret's further decisions.
  • Xig
Have read quite a bit of Zola and usually enjoy him very much. This was not one of his better efforts. It appeared that the author's only purpose was to show how much he knew about plants, and birds, and animals, and church rituals.
  • Aria
Serge Mouret, a Roman Catholic priest unable to suppress his carnal desires first develops a spiritual devotion for Virgin Mary, which leaves him unsatisfied. Instead, it is Albine, a niece of an old man, who occupies a once abandoned and then burned down palace, surrounded by survived flourishing gardens and cascades, with whom Serge develops a full-fledged love relationship. Nevertheless, torn between carnal desires and religious prejudices, Serge abandons Albine and the profuse Paradou garden and returns to the church. He ends up being guilty in the death of his beloved.
The question is: what is Serge Mouret's fault? Is it in him betraying the postulates of religion or in him abandoning the earthly joys? We see two outlooks on life. The first outlook is renouncing everything earthly in the name the Beyond. The second outlook is the joyous perception of life and admiring the world and the nature in all its diversity.
Mouret is torn between the two outlooks and his internal struggle ends with a fault, but not against the religious dogma, rather, against sensuous joys. One must say that there are things in life other than the utopian Paradou. The Artaud village, which it neighbors is populated with savage people. Their brutish instincts contradict the beauty of life. So, which is right? Is it the religion and the Beyond or is it the diverse life, in which brutish and lyrical things coexist? The symbolic end of the novel (Albine's death and Serge Mouret's retarded sister Desiree proclaiming with joy the birth of a calf) convincingly proves the superiority of the material perception of the everyday life over religious superstitions.
  • Mallador
Of the twenty books in the Rougon-Macquart series, this (the fifth book) is one of my least favorites. It is uncharacteristic of Zola's writing style, and doesn't read like a part of the series at all. The book starts out well enough. Zola describes the small village of Les Artauds where Serge Mouret serves as parish priest, the lives of its none-too-pious inhabitants, and the role the Church plays in their everyday lives. I don't think I'm giving too much away by saying that the Sin mentioned in the title is that he falls in love with a woman. From there the book goes downhill. Zola abandons his trademark naturalism for a less realistic style that seems to be a throwback to earlier symbolist literature. The characters are largely allegorical. We see them as symbols for "Religion" or "Nature", rather than as three-dimensional human beings. Perhaps it's just my perspective as a twenty-first century reader that makes it hard for me to identify with two characters frolicking in an enchanted garden. The love affair is too idyllic, to the point of tedium. The book feels like a short story that has been drawn out to the length of a novel. Or perhaps it would have worked better as a poem, considering the bulk of the love scenes are comprised of long descriptive passages about nature. Those who want to tackle the entire Rougon-Macquart series should (and will, of course) read this book. Others should avoid it.
  • Zepavitta
This book, number five in the Rougon-Macquart saga and the sequel to "The Conquest Of Plassans", is really quite unique in French literature. In a way, you could say it's a forerunner of "Lady Chatterley's Lover" with the sexes reversed. A young and very devoted priest is nursed back to health after illness and has his sensual passions aroused in a big way by a teenage girl living virtually alone in a huge, century-old abandoned walled garden. Add to this a fire-and-brimstone friar, an intellectually-challenged younger sister, a kindly doctor of an uncle and the earthy animal spirits of southern French country life as a background to it all and you have something special, even if the final outcome of the love affair is unbelievable. Full of poetry, passion, symbolism and Zola's usual intoxicating powers of description, but not the book you'll find serialized in your local church magazine. Well worth reading as it shows that Zola's craft as a writer has fully matured but he has yet to find the subject to hit the big time sales-wise.