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Download The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus eBook

by Christopher Marlowe

Download The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus eBook
ISBN:
1605971715
Author:
Christopher Marlowe
Category:
Classics
Language:
English
Publisher:
Book Jungle (March 13, 2008)
Pages:
76 pages
EPUB book:
1313 kb
FB2 book:
1733 kb
DJVU:
1576 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
582


FAUSTUS discovered in his study. FAUSTUS Settle thy studies, Faustus, and begin To sound the depth of that thou wilt profess: Having commenc'd, be a divine in shew, Yet level at the end of every art, And live and die in Aristotle's works. Sweet Analytics, 'tis thou hast ravish'd me!

FAUSTUS discovered in his study. Sweet Analytics, 'tis thou hast ravish'd me! Bene disserere est finis logices.

The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus, commonly referred to simply as Doctor Faustus, is an Elizabethan tragedy by Christopher Marlowe, based on German stories about the title character Faust

The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus, commonly referred to simply as Doctor Faustus, is an Elizabethan tragedy by Christopher Marlowe, based on German stories about the title character Faust. It was written sometime between 1589 and 1592, and might have been performed between 1592 and Marlowe's death in 1593. Two different versions of the play were published in the Jacobean era, several years later.

The tragical history of doctor faustus by christopher marlowe from the quarto of 1604. The tragicall history of D. faustus. As IT hath bene acted by the right honorable the earle of nottingham his seruants. Now would I have a book where I might see all characters and planets of the heavens, that I might know their motions and dispositions.

The tragical history of doctor faustus. From the quarto of 1616. O, Faustus, lay that damned book aside, And gaze not on it, lest it tempt thy soul, And heap God’s heavy wrath upon thy head!

The tragical history of doctor faustus. O, Faustus, lay that damned book aside, And gaze not on it, lest it tempt thy soul, And heap God’s heavy wrath upon thy head! Read, read the Scriptures: ­that is blasphemy. Go forward, Faustus, in that famous art Wherein all Nature’s treasure is contain’d: Be thou on earth as Jove is in the sky, Lord and commander of these elements.

Episode 14: On magicians, playwrights, and the facts between history's gaps "The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus" by Christopher Marlowe.

Faustus is a great story of hubris, temptation, and regret

Faustus is a great story of hubris, temptation, and regret. It has also been told in so many forms over the centuries that it has had a lasting artistic impact on Western culture, especially in literature and drama. That said, it is a story that everyone who loves books and theater should read. Dr. Faustus's intrigue with magic is all the more chilling in the historical context of Elizabethan England, when it was written, generally, and in particular the activities of her adviser John Dee and his fascination with the black arts. The play is no empty fantasy but a withering criticism of Dee and of the dabbling done during Elizabeth's reign, written with insight and wit.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Электронная книга "The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus", Christopher Marlowe. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Marlowe was an English poet, dramatist and translator in the Elizabethian period. Faust is the famous story of a man selling his soul to the devil for power and knowledge. On a deeper level man's decay from choosing material things over the spiritual is depicted.
  • Kelenn
…with the devil.

Thanks to a fellow Amazon reviewer, I was privileged to see the operatic version of this classic tale under the summer night skies of Santa Fe. I knew the essence of the story prior to viewing the opera, but had never actually read one of the versions. The tale is based on Germanic folklore, and is set in that country, even though Christopher Marlowe is English. His was the first formal written version of the tale. Subsequent versions would be produced by Goethe and Thomas Mann – and, of course there is the opera itself, written by Charles Gounod, and first produced in Paris, in 1859.

Twenty four years of knowledge and power. That is the value Dr. Faustus places on his immortal soul. He will join Mephistophilis (one of the varying names for the devil) for all eternity for “…letting him live in all voluptuousness…” “…to give me whatsoever I shall ask, to tell me whatsoever I demand, to slay mine enemies, and aid my friends…”

Throughout Marlow’s version, he takes numerous jabs at organized religion, for example: “Both law and physic are for petty wits; Divinity is the basest of the three…” and “Go, and return an old Franciscan friar; That holy shape becomes a devil best.” One of the themes of Marlow’s tale is that the bargain may have resulted from too much learning… the desire to read it all. Hum!

Once again the play is the thing… as we have seen acted out over the one and a half years… the thirst for the power of the Presidency of the United States, and the seeming “anything goes” ethos. No lie, no trick is beneath anyone. A deep embrace of Mephistophilis, not for 24 years, but for four. But don’t get me started…
As for Marlowe’s first formal version, written in the late 16th century, 4-stars, and I hope to read the more fully developed work of this tale as written by Goethe.
  • Bradeya
Dr. Faustus is a great story of hubris, temptation, and regret. It has also been told in so many forms over the centuries that it has had a lasting artistic impact on Western culture, especially in literature and drama. That said, it is a story that everyone who loves books and theater should read.

You could find much thicker copies of this work with extensive interpretation, long forewords, and various other analytical and historical additions. Those may benefit you a great deal. Since college, I have often opted for the simplicity and low cost of Dover Thrift editions. They provide just enough additional notation to clarify issues with antiquated word usage and such, while not disttracting me with minutiae and preventing me from getting lost in the story. They may not be impressively bound in leather, but I buy books to read and learn, not to impress.
  • Prince Persie
Doctor Faustus is a surprisingly short and, for a 500 year old work, readable play. This free Kindle version has some OCR-type errors, but is itself very readable. There are hot links to and from footnotes.

Marlowe gives a chilling portrayal of a man who chooses to have the world - particularly through magic - temporarily in exchange for his soul eternally. Whenever Dr. Faustus questions his own choice, the Devil beseeches him and he reaffirms that choice. Dr. Faustus's intrigue with magic is all the more chilling in the historical context of Elizabethan England, when it was written, generally, and in particular the activities of her adviser John Dee and his fascination with the black arts. The play is no empty fantasy but a withering criticism of Dee and of the dabbling done during Elizabeth's reign, written with insight and wit. Those who try to summon and command angels will deal with the fallen angels.

The play can also be read as a critique of Puritanism/Calvinism by a Catholic, but there are also passages that leave room for argument by suggesting predestination; then again some ambiguity would be prudent if a Catholic were writing during the time of the Virgin Queen.
  • Mr_KiLLaURa
I purchased this book in order to be able to follow a Globe Theater production of Marlowe's play, and I paid special attention to the fact that this volume had both the longer and the shorter versions of Marlowe's texts, so I would be sure to have one which matched the filmed play.

As it turned out, the filmed play was a bit different from both versions in this volume, and it was not immediately clear why that was. I was hoping that the two versions of the play would have been printed on facing pages, so if any dialogue was borrowed from the other version, I could see that. But no luck.

It seems that even between the two main versions, there are new variations in place, and the Globe players, probably in the interests of historical accuracy, were using the text of the longer version, printed after Marlowe's death. So, my plan to be able to follow the rapid fire Elizabethan delivery of dialogue was thwarted.

I ordered a 2nd hand copy, which was in "very good" condition; however, it was comb bound, instead of the usual trade paperback binding in signatures, and glue. That was a momentary surprise, but not critical. If you are fussy about that, don't order a second hand copy.