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by John Jacob Astor

Download A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future eBook
ISBN:
1434611345
Author:
John Jacob Astor
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
English
Publisher:
BiblioBazaar (April 3, 2007)
Pages:
290 pages
EPUB book:
1391 kb
FB2 book:
1832 kb
DJVU:
1637 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
493


A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future is a science fiction novel by John Jacob Astor IV, published in 1894.

A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future is a science fiction novel by John Jacob Astor IV, published in 1894.

A feature of thespiritual world is, that it does not interfere with the natural,and the natural, except through faith, is. .

A feature of thespiritual world is, that it does not interfere with the natural,and the natural, except through faith, is not aware of itspresence. I have seen none of them myself in my journeys to other planets;but as the sun shines upon the just and the unjust, and there isno exception to Nature's laws, I can reply that in time they do,and with equal powers their incentive to roam would be greater;for we are drawn together by common sympathy and pure, requitedlove, while.

There were also many other causes, as the ambition ofthe Russian Czar, supported by his country's vast thoughimperfectly developed resources and practically unlimited supplyof men, one phase of which was the constant.

There were also many other causes, as the ambition ofthe Russian Czar, supported by his country's vast thoughimperfectly developed resources and practically unlimited supplyof men, one phase of which was the constant ferment in the BalkanPeninsula, and another Russia's schemes for extension in Asia;another was the general desire for colonies in Africa, in whichone Continental power pretty effectually blocked another .

Book . hapter . jupiter. I. antecedental II. president bearwarden's speech I. prof.

A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32. Contents. Book . Cortlandt'S historical sketch of the world in . cortlandt's history continued V. far-reaching plans VI. hard at work VIII.

A Journey in Other Worlds book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

John Jacob Astor died tragically when the Titanic sank during its maiden voyage in April 1912, after . Among his lesser known accomplishments, Astor also wrote a science fiction novel, A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future, published in 1894

John Jacob Astor died tragically when the Titanic sank during its maiden voyage in April 1912, after seeing his young wife safely into a lifeboat. Among his lesser known accomplishments, Astor also wrote a science fiction novel, A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future, published in 1894. Set in the year 2000, the novel is divided into three parts. According to Astor’s utopian vision of the future, all our problems will be solved in the year 2000, at least if you’re an American.

Author John Jacob Astor met his end in the sinking of the Titanic. Though he was born into wealth, Astor achieved fame as a popular science fiction writer. In this, his best-known work, Astor spins a captivating tale of what life would be like in the twenty-first century, including many technological predictions that are amazingly accurate.

and replete with a dazzling array of futuristic devices, A Journey in Other .

Wildly imaginative but grounded in reasoned scientific speculation, A Journey in Other Worlds races far ahead of the nineteenth century to imagine what life would be like in the year 2000. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Earth is effectively a corporate technocracy, with big businesses using incredible advances in science to improve life on the planet as a whole.

online by John Jacob Astor at ReadCentral. com, the free online library full of thousands of classic books.

Read A Journey in Other Worlds A Romance of the Future online by John Jacob Astor at ReadCentral. Now you can read A Journey in Other Worlds A Romance of the Future free from the comfort of your computer or mobile phone and enjoy other many other free books by John Jacob Astor.

Astor, John Jacob, 1864-1912 You can read A Journey in Other Worlds

Astor, John Jacob, 1864-1912 You can read A Journey in Other Worlds. a Romance of the Future by Astor, John Jacob, 1864-1912 in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Ayrault manipulated the silk-covered glass handles and the Callisto moved on slowly in comparison with its recent speed- and all remained glued to their telescopes as they peered through the rushing clouds now forming and now dissolving before their eyes.' (Excerpt)
  • Gralmeena
When he perished from the sinking of the Titanic, fur empire heir and real estate tycoon John Jacob Astor IV was one of the richest men on Earth. Among his lesser known accomplishments, Astor also wrote a science fiction novel, A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future, published in 1894. Set in the year 2000, the novel is divided into three parts. The first depicts America at the dawn of the 21st century, the second details an expedition to the planet Jupiter, and the third follows the space voyage to Saturn.

According to Astor’s utopian vision of the future, all our problems will be solved in the year 2000, at least if you’re an American. The United States has clearly become the world’s superpower and enjoys the advantages of many remarkable technological marvels. Astor was well-versed in the science of his times, and his sci-fi speculations are exhaustively wide-ranging. The book reads as if someone binge read every issue of Popular Science magazine and then unloaded every possible idea into one story. In addition to such prescient ideas as airplanes, universal telecommunications, and various schemes of renewable energy, Astor envisions a project to alter the tilt of the Earth’s axis in order to ensure a pleasant climate year round (for America and Europe, anyway; to hell with everyone else). Colonel Bearwarden is the president of the corporation undertaking this task. Together with his young stockholder Dick Ayrault and Dr. Courtlandt, a “government expert” in all branches of science, he comes up with a plan for an interplanetary expedition. This is made possible by the (fictional) force of apergy, a means of electrically charging objects, such as spaceships, so that gravity repels rather than attracts them. Together, in a spacecraft that sounds a lot like a motor home, curtained windows and all, the three set out for Jupiter.

Once they get to their destination, the trio conduct themselves less like a scientific expedition and more like a hunting party, shooting everything in sight. By 19th-century standards, Astor provides a reasonable scientific justification for every aspect of Jupiter’s environment: its comfortable climate, breathable atmosphere, drinkable water, and its inhabitation by dinosaurs. While the book definitely deserves kudos for its audacity and imagination, it is unfortunately a bore to read. Too many chapters are simply long discussions on astrogeology, which might have been interesting if 95% of what the three men are saying hadn’t already been proven wrong over the past century. The book gets worse when it moves on to Saturn. There Astor abandons science altogether and dives wholeheartedly into the supernatural, depicting Saturn as a world inhabited by the spirits of dead humans from Earth. Though scientifically minded, Astor’s fervent religious piety is evident in his attempts to propose half-baked scientific explanations for everything from biblical stories to the afterlife. What started out as a farfetched but scientifically grounded work of speculative fiction simply devolves into yet another 19th-century Romantic paean to love and divinity.

Astor also makes it clear that his brave new world is only intended for Whites. His vision of utopian America rests largely on colonization and exploitation, whether of Africa or Jupiter. By 2000, the “progressive Anglo-Saxons” have conquered much of the globe and will soon “absorb or run out all inferior races.” While racism is common in 19th-century literature, rarely is it stated so blatantly as that. Though in many ways A Journey in Other Worlds is admirable science fiction for its time, there are good reasons, both literary and ethical, why it’s not popularly regarded as a classic.
  • Stonewing
I was more impressed by Astor's work than I expected to be, although it does get tedious at times, especially when characters are waxing eloquent about science that doesn't exist. (Some of these speeches put me in mind of John Galt's excessively long speech in Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged.) Astor certainly had a vivid imagination and was obviously quite intelligent. The novel is straightforward enough in its plot--three men use the newly discovered principle of "apergy" to fly to Jupiter and Saturn and then return home. Both planets, conveniently, can support human and animal life, and it turns out that Saturn is actually the home of a number of spirits of humans who passed away on Earth.

Astor mixes his Christian faith ("None of us can win heaven; salvation is the gift of God." "I . . . escaped hades by the grace of the Omnipotent, rather than by virtue of any good I did on earth.") with limitless faith in man's ability to evolve and subdue the earth. (For example, scientists are "correcting" the earth's axis to make it perfectly vertical in the opening chapters [!].)

I found it sadly ironic that a few years after having written this Astor would die on the Titanic--another testament to his era's limitless faith in man's abilities to conquer the elements.
  • Steelrunner
Just finished this book. It is a study in 19th century thinking and lifestyle. The book has many wrong conclusions about the future but it is curious how many things it got correct. In order for any sciende fiction story to work there must be suspension of belief.....after all in Stark Trek all the aliens speak English and have two hands and two legs....it is when those elements are accepted by the reader that the story can be told. In "A Journey In Other Worlds" we must accept the limited understanding of what the 19th century understood as space travel before we can judge the story. We now know that the craft as described would never survive in space and we know enough about the outter planets to discard the possibility of mastodons on Saturn or flying lizards on Jupiter.

The story is written from the point of view of one of the richest men in the closing years of the 19th century and so his concept of "exploration" is basically a space safari. There is some scientific work done by the crew of the Calypso but all three men are very keen to shoot first and explore later.

One thing I found highly interesting in the story is the melding of science and religion. While the explorers are on Earth and in the first leg of their journey it is clearly a scientific endevour. Man is seen as master of nature drying up the Florida Everglades, communicating across vast distances and even shifting the tilt of the planet in order to make the deserts bloom and remove the harshness of the seasons. Man can do it all.

On their arrival on Saturn the story changes from man's glories to man's challenges and the ringged plannet is seen as the next challenge, the undiscoverd country which will serve as humanity's new home.

In the last leg of the story the crew of the Calypso reach Jupiter and here man and science are drawn out of the equation. Jupiter is a spirit world, sometimes described as Pergutory and other times as the gates of heaven it self. It is interesting that Astor chose the furthest point reached by man as the place where science and religion meet. As the crew learns many religious attributes are simply scientific phenomena as yet not-understood by the people of Earth. Science and religion are not exclusive, rather religion is seen as science not-yet-known. Having reached this threshhold the crew can go no further even though they learn that there is more beyond Jupiter...Man can only go as far as his science takes him but he can aspire to go further.

It is a fun story in line with "The First Men on the Moon" or "Voyage to the Center of the Earth" though it lacks the fame of those stories. The science is flawed by our standards but who knows how flawed will our science be when a future generation reads our books?