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by Christopher Isherwood

Download Prater Violet eBook
ISBN:
0413563103
Author:
Christopher Isherwood
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
English
Publisher:
Methuen Publishing Ltd; New edition edition (August 9, 1984)
Pages:
102 pages
EPUB book:
1389 kb
FB2 book:
1462 kb
DJVU:
1995 kb
Other formats
rtf lit txt docx
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
796


Home Christopher Isherwood Prater Violet. The author and publisher have provided this e-book to you for your personal use only.

Home Christopher Isherwood Prater Violet. Christopher Isherwood. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10.

Christopher Isherwood (26 August 1904 – 4 January 1986) was an Anglo-American novelist, playwright, screenwriter, autobiographer, and diarist

Christopher Isherwood (26 August 1904 – 4 January 1986) was an Anglo-American novelist, playwright, screenwriter, autobiographer, and diarist. His best-known works include Goodbye to Berlin (1939), a l novel which inspired the musical Cabaret, A Single Man (1964) adapted as a film by Tom Ford in 2009, and Christopher and His Kind (1976), a memoir which "carried him into the heart of the Gay Liberation movement".

Isherwood's story centers on the production of the vacuous fictional melodrama Prater Violet, set in. .view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook.

Isherwood's story centers on the production of the vacuous fictional melodrama Prater Violet, set in nineteenth-century Vienna.

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Prater Violet The book evokes the atmosphere of Cambridge as Isherwood knew it and describes his life as a tutor, a medical student, and a s. I Am a Camera

by Christopher Isherwood. Christopher Isherwood originally intended Down There on a Visit to be part of The Lost, the unfinished epic novel that would also incorporate his famous Berlin Stories. Tracing many of the same themes as that earlier work, this novel is a bemused, sometim. The World In The Evening. by Christopher Isherwood. The book evokes the atmosphere of Cambridge as Isherwood knew it and describes his life as a tutor, a medical student, and a s. I Am a Camera. by John Van Druten · Christopher Isherwood.

Prater Violet resembles episodes in Goodbye to Berlin and keeps up the same high level of excellence' - Edmund .

Prater Violet resembles episodes in Goodbye to Berlin and keeps up the same high level of excellence' - Edmund WilsonAn impatient phone call from the temperamental Austrian director, Friedrich Bergmann, introduces a young Christopher Isherwood to the film industry. Isherwood's job is to rescue the script of an idiotic love story set in nineteenth-century Vienna, a film called Prater Violet. In the real Vienna of 1934 the Austrian Right crushes a socialist uprising. Bergmann is distraught and his prophecy of the coming war goes unheeded

Электронная книга "Prater Violet: A Novel", Christopher Isherwood.

Электронная книга "Prater Violet: A Novel", Christopher Isherwood. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Prater Violet: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Christopher Isherwood. krishna and His Disciples PLAYS (with W. H. Auden) On the Frontier The Ascent of F6 The Dog beneath the Skin TRAVEL The Condor and the Cows Journey to a War (with. oreLess Show More Show Less.

A great read - Highly recommended. Published by Thriftbooks. Having discovered the quote, I read the entire novel and was enraptured by it. I read it in one sitting and couldn't put it down.

by. Isherwood, Christopher, 1904-1986. Books for People with Print Disabilities. New York : Avon Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Internet Archive Books.

  • Questanthr
Why is it that there were so many great, funny, brilliant, touching, ridiculous, informative, perfectly-honed novels by British authors in the Twenties-Thirties? Where equally brilliant Americans like Pound and Elliot were drawn to myth, ostentatious intellectuality--as if THEY were the ones destroyed by the Great War--there was a wonderful blend of resignation and whimsy in the work of Waugh, Isherwood, and a few others.
Rather like the work of Ernst Lubisch, nein?
  • Уou ll never walk alone
A brilliant satirical look at at how a Hollywood movie was put together in the 1940's, as told from the point of view of a fledgling screenwriter. Elegantly written, very funny and oddly touching. Anyone who read Isherwood's "Berlin Stories" with pleasure will enjoy this short novel.
  • Coiriel
Prater Violet easily ranks with the very best novels about film-making ever written. It is witty, funny and sad. It is also a trove of insights into the film industry, or the film industry as it was, and all from the point of view of an aspiring screenwriter.
  • Swift Summer
Great find
  • tref
First of all, a happy thank-you to friend C. for making this comic novel available to me.

PRATER VIOLET is an engaging novella that effectively satirizes the making of movies in the 1930s. The first-person narrator, "Christopher Isherwood," is a close adjunct to the author, and not above having a bit of fun with the making of a cloying studio movie set in "Olde" Vienna whose director is worried sick about the onslaught of fascism in the real Vienna, where his close relatives are marooned. The movie studio is set in London but much of the plot could apply to the Hollywood studios of the Thirties, as well. A quick read; pay attention to the denouement. Not a major Isherwood novel but so much fun it doesn't matter. Originally published in 1945.
  • Eseve
This novel, published in 1946, is short, but not skimpy. Impressionistic, but not shallow. "Satirical," if you like, but none of the absurdities seem exaggerated.

Take the openning bit of comedy- the phone call from Imperial Bulldog telling Mr. Isherwood (for the author has put himself in the novel) that he's to go to work on a movie about Vienna.. Vienna, Berlin, pretty much the same thing. Isherwood can act disdainful of the highhandedness and philistinism, but before he knows it, he's chasing Friedrich Bergman, the mercurial Viennese director from hotel to tobacconist to.. lunch with Chatsworth, the head of Imperial Bulldog.

And there the artists, writer and director, form a bond (or is it Bund?) against the phillistines, management, the capitalist Chatsworth and his lackey, Ashmeade- which is never stated, by the way. Isherwood is the opposite of heavy-handed. Bergman merely says, "You know, already, I feel absolutely no shame before you. We are like two married men who meet in a whorehouse."

Bergman is wonderful- ridiculous and sad. He is prone to fits of despair about the course of events in Germany and Austria, the irony being that although no one else in England, in 1934, can see it, he is all too right. And somehow, he makes the silly movie about a prince and a flower girl ABOUT the class struggle, although Bergman's Marxo-Freudianism, while fascinating, is not really the final word.

Nor is the irascible celtic engineer's, Herr Cut-Master Lawrence, although he gets some of the best lines, and, again, is completely true to life.

"The movies aren't drama. They aren't literature. They're pure mathematics ...Still, it's no use talking. You'll never have the guts (to make abstract films) You'd much rather whine about prostitution, and keep on making Prater Violets. And that's why the public despises you, in its heart."

In short, an absolute gem.
  • VizoRRR
In 1934 Christopher Isherwood had worked as a script-writer on a British film (The Little Friend) which was directed by an Austrian Jew, Berthold Viertel, who had already been sufficiently alarmed by Hitler's seizure of power in Germany to have left Austria. Isherwood wrote this short novel in 1945. It is set in the period in the months after the Reichstag Fire. Isherwood appears as himself; the film world of the time is captured well and at length; but the director is here called Friedrich Bergmann, and the film becomes a Ruritanian musical called Prater Violet. Bergmann is a richly "continental" character, temperamental and larger than life; he is voraciously and perceptively interested in an England which is as yet unaware of the danger that Hitler presented to Europe. As a socialist, he is violently disturbed by the news of Dollfuss' brutal crushing in February 1934 of "Red Vienna", a tragedy which made the shallow reactions of Britain unbearable to him. Isherwood felt that his own fashionable left-wing sympathies were feeble in the face of Bergmann's tempestuous rage, which vented itself violently on the uncomprehending people involved in the filming. The way the book ends is unexpected - both with regard to Bergmann, and even more with regard to Isherwood, who, in the last five pages, enters a territory of unhappy introspection for which nothing has prepared us, and which, in my view, makes for an unsatisfactory end of the novel.