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by Evelyn Waugh

Download Men at Arms eBook
ISBN:
0413598101
Author:
Evelyn Waugh
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
English
Publisher:
Mentheun; New e. edition (July 3, 1986)
Pages:
245 pages
EPUB book:
1867 kb
FB2 book:
1362 kb
DJVU:
1367 kb
Other formats
lrf doc azw lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
700


Men at Arms is a 1952 novel by the British novelist Evelyn Waugh. Men at Arms is the first novel in Waugh's Sword of Honour series, the author's look at the Second World War.

Men at Arms is a 1952 novel by the British novelist Evelyn Waugh. The novels loosely parallel Waugh's wartime experiences. The protagonist is Guy Crouchback, heir of a declining aristocratic English Roman Catholic family

The City, lapped now by the tide of illustrious converts, still remembered with honour its old companions in arms.

The City, lapped now by the tide of illustrious converts, still remembered with honour its old companions in arms. Gervase Crouchback stroked his side-whiskers and found a respectful audience for his views on the Irish question and the Catholic missions in India. Hermione set up her easel among the ruins and while she painted Gervase read aloud from the poems of Tennyson and Patmore.

In MEN AT ARMS, Waugh writes about the experiences in 1939 and 1940 of Guy Crouchback, the scion of an old . First, a point for those who disparage Evelyn Waugh's books because he was an antediluvian Roman Catholic, a snob, and apparently a very nasty man.

In MEN AT ARMS, Waugh writes about the experiences in 1939 and 1940 of Guy Crouchback, the scion of an old aristocratic English family that has lost its money. The backdrop for Guy's experiences is England's dark days at the start of World War II-the Blitzkrieg of Poland, the Twilight War, the Battle of France, Churchill's assumption of power, and the Battle of Britain.

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Cheers,’ said Apthorpe. Look here, you two, you’d better have those drinks on me,’ said Major Tickeridge, ‘junior officers aren’t supposed to drink in the ante-room before lunch. My dear chap, you couldn’t possibly know. I ought to have warned you. It’s a rule we have for the youngsters. It’s all rot applying it to you chaps, of course, but there it is. If you want a drink tell the to send it to the billiards-room. No one will mind that. Thanks for telling us, sir,’ said Apthorpe

Men at Arms is the first book in Waugh’s brilliant trilogy, Sword of Honour, which chronicles the fortunes of Guy Crouchback. The second and third volumes, Officers and Gentlemen and Unconditional Surrender, are also published in Penguin.

Men at Arms is the first book in Waugh’s brilliant trilogy, Sword of Honour, which chronicles the fortunes of Guy Crouchback. Sword of Honour has recently been made into a television drama series, with screenplay by William Boyd.

Men at Arms is the first book in Waugh's brilliant trilogy, Sword of Honour, which chronicles the fortunes of Guy Crouchback.

Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966), whom time called "one of the century's great masters of English prose," wrote sixteen novels, including the" Sword of Honour" trilogy, comprising Men at Arms, Officers and Gentlemen.

Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966), whom time called "one of the century's great masters of English prose," wrote sixteen novels, including the" Sword of Honour" trilogy, comprising Men at Arms, Officers and Gentlemen, and The End of the Battle. His short fiction is collected in the complete stories of Evelyn Waugh. The first volume of Evelyn Waugh's masterful trilogy about war, religion, and politics. Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966), whom time called "one of the century's great masters of English prose," wrote sixteen novels, including the" Sword of Honour" trilogy, comprising Men at Arms, Officers and Gentlemen, and The End of the Battle.

  • Jothris
In MEN AT ARMS, Waugh writes about the experiences in 1939 and 1940 of Guy Crouchback, the scion of an old aristocratic English family that has lost its money. The backdrop for Guy's experiences is England's dark days at the start of World War II--the Blitzkrieg of Poland, the Twilight War, the Battle of France, Churchill's assumption of power, and the Battle of Britain. In this parlous time, Waugh shows Guy finding a position in the army, training with the Royal Corps of Halberdiers, assuming home guard duties, and then participating in a poorly defined mission in Senegal, as his nation is fighting for its survival. Throughout, Waugh focuses on the small issues of Crouchback's life--the people he meets, the training he receives, the eccentricities and shenanigans of the soldiers--as he tries to do his duty and contribute to the great cause of his country.

In telling this story, Waugh absolutely piles on the irony, which surely culminates in this novel's final few chapters, when Guy finally participates in military action and shows soldierly concern for a hospitalized fellow officer. Ultimately, Waugh's ironies--the huge disconnect between Guy's honorable and decent intentions and his actual experiences--are the true subject of this book, with Waugh showing that, on the soldier's level, war borders on sad and twisted farce.

In MEN AT ARMS, Waugh's primary characters--Crouchback, Apthorpe, and Ritchie-Hook--are soldiers who, within the limits of their personalities, perform their duty. Never do they wonder about soldiering or question the values of the Halberdiers. This is not, in other words, profound literature in which characters grow and question their assumptions. Instead, this is a novel about the absurdity of duty. And, it's probably hilarious, at moments, to Brits, who would be fully attuned to its slightly odd class-conscious characters.

Waugh certainly writes gracefully and with great pace. Further, he is entertaining and manages to keep his story interesting, even though nothing very interesting happens until the very end. While not great fiction, this novel is fun and highly readable and I'm hooked. I believe the next book in Waugh's THE SWORD OF HONOR trilogy is OFFICERS AND GENTLEMEN.
  • Tygralbine
This is my favourite Evelyn Waugh novel. It is classically perfect and very funny. It is the only one of the Sword of Honour books that is comic, though it has a lot of weight to it. Apthorpe is one of the best characters in literature, funny, tragic, sympathetic, annoying, a multi-facetted creation and very memorable. This edition is ideal, with an attractive, decent-sized typeface and printed in black, comfortable and enjoyable to read. Along with the original hardback it is the best edition I have seen. This is Evelyn Waugh with real gravitas.
  • Beanisend
Reviewing a novel written by Mr. Evelyn Waugh would be an exercise in misplaced arrogance. It's a book of great integrity
and has an exquisitely controlled style whose humour does not ever make the narrative flippant nor, at the same time, does its earnest approach make the account broodingly solemn. Any ordinary writer could have committed either of the errors.

This is a wonderful book.
  • from earth
For me, this is Waugh at his best. Folio Society does itself proud.
  • fire dancer
It is Evelyn Waugh. Not his absolute best, but he is easily my favorite writer. Dry, British sense of humor and farce.
  • Gravelblade
Interesting look at life in the British military in WWII. In some ways, it reminds me of a British "Catch 22". Some of the colloquial terms are not understandable for a modern-day American. A, light, enjoyable read.
  • Ance
Waugh in his humorous, lighthearted vein. Enjoyable till the last page. A caricature of the army in war times. You will seldom find the depth and ambition of "Brideshead Revisited" here.
An accurate view of the absurdities of army life anywhere, in particular at the beginning of the second world war. Waugh has a kken eye for irony and the ridiculous.