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Download She May Not Leave eBook

by Fay Weldon

Download She May Not Leave eBook
ISBN:
0002258528
Author:
Fay Weldon
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
English
Publisher:
Atlantic Monthly Press; First American Edition edition (2005)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1786 kb
FB2 book:
1225 kb
DJVU:
1244 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
164


Praise for She May Not Leave: Dry, subversive, and witty, Fay Weldon locks her .

Praise for She May Not Leave: Dry, subversive, and witty, Fay Weldon locks her eye onto every parent’s most neurotic fear and calmly turns the screws. Bella Pollen, author of Midnight.

Be careful who you invite into the bosom of your home – she may never leav. novel from Fay Weldon, the writer who knows women better than they know themselves. Hattie has a difficult if loving partner, Martyn, an absentee mother, Lallie, and a cynical if attentive grandmother Frances. She tries to do the right and moral thing in a tricky world, and always has.

Fay Weldon's 25th novel fictionalises a phenomenon of contemporary family life mainly confined to headlines - the presence within the bosom of the family of an ambiguous live-in employee, the nanny or au pair.

Fay Weldon lets her incisive wit loose on a hot issue facing many modern families - child care, and what can happen when that involves having a nanny under your roof

Fay Weldon lets her incisive wit loose on a hot issue facing many modern families - child care, and what can happen when that involves having a nanny under your roof. Hattie and Martyn are the proud parents of newborn Kitty; both are in their early thirties, smart, handsome, and, for reasons of liberal principle, not married but partnered. All seems fine at first - healthy baby, happy couple - but when they have to decide who’ll look after little Kitty, things get complicated.

She May Not Leave book. Fay Weldon offers an amusing send-up of modern relationships and child-rearing practices in this caustic novel about a middle-class London couple. Hattie, a literary agent, and lefty journalist Martyn have elected to partner rather than submit to official wedlock and become husband and wife. For their infant, Kitty, they hire a young, beautiful Polish au pair with a "Fay Weldon offers an amusing send-up of modern relationships and child-rearing practices in this caustic novel about a middle-class London couple.

Fay Weldon CBE (born 22 September 1931) is a British novelist, short story writer, playwright, and essayist whose work has been associated with feminism

Fay Weldon CBE (born 22 September 1931) is a British novelist, short story writer, playwright, and essayist whose work has been associated with feminism. In her fiction, Weldon typically portrays contemporary women who find themselves trapped in oppressive situations caused by the patriarchal structure of Western, in particular British, society.

She May Not Leave confirms, when she's on form there's simply no touching Fay Weldon as a writer (The Observer). Fay Weldon lets her incisive wit loose on a hot issue facing many modern families-child care, and what can happen when that involves having a nanny under your roof. She May Not Leave confirms, when she's on form there's simply no touching Fay Weldon as a writer (The Observer).

Books related to She May Not Leave. Junie B. Jones Junie B. Jones Is Not a Crook.

скачать книгу бесплатно. Martyn Comes Home To Agnieszka. She smiles at him as if she were happy to see him, not, as so often these days, with a complaint and an argument ready to spring to her lips. He had forgotten how pretty she is. She is wearing a bra again, so she has two separate breasts not a kind of undifferentiated flesh shelf. Her figure is back to its prebaby state

Fay Weldon lets her incisive wit loose on a hot issue facing many modern families - child care, and what can . There are many gems in SHE MAY NOT LEAVE. Weldon has given the reader countless opportunities to anticipate the final result. It's so subtle and so polished, yet so innocent.

Fay Weldon lets her incisive wit loose on a hot issue facing many modern families - child care, and what can happen when that involves having a nanny under your.

Fay Weldon lets her incisive wit loose on a hot issue facing many modern families — child care, and what can happen when that involves having a nanny under your roof. Hattie and Martyn are the proud parents of newborn Kitty; both are in their early thirties, smart, handsome, and, for reasons of liberal principle, not married but partnered. All seems fine at first — healthy baby, happy couple — but when they have to decide who’ll look after little Kitty, things get complicated. Hattie’s dying to get back to work but Martyn fears employing foreign help might hurt his leftist political aspirations. Martyn capitulates when Agnieska arrives — a Polish nanny who happens to be both domestic goddess and first-rate belly dancer, the maker of a mean cup of cocoa who’s also educated in early childhood development. Having her in the house makes life livable again for the young couple, so when problems arise with her immigration papers Martyn and Hattie will do anything to keep her in the country. But will their decision to have Martyn marry her be the trouble-free solution they envision.
  • Arthunter
Fay Weldon is something of an aquired taste. Words like "ascerbic" and "brisk" have been used about her, and those are accurate. I think Weldon annoys quite a few who read her. She annoyed me considerably when I first read her years ago. Then I realized that Weldon aggravates by not writing what we expect--she doesn't write to make us happy, but to tell the truth. Weldon's choice of subject matter is the eternal love/war between the genders, and, just as importantly, how families create the main characters whose lives we follow. In Weldon's world, men and women put up with a great deal from each other, until the day a crack in the relationship becomes a fissure, and life goes on, but in a far more confusing and unanchored fashion.

"She May Not Leave" is about a young professional couple who hire a nanny/housekeeper, and realize how dependent on her they become. They go to ludicrous lengths to keep the talented Agniewska, telling themselves they'll never find another like her. But woven into Hattie and Martyn's story is a meta-story, a story of a family of women going back generations who just can't mother very well or very long. The relationships between mothers and daughters are distant, or outright dysfunctional, but grandmothers and granddaughters get along and support and love each other. The story of this unusual matriarchy is as interesting as the surface "main story." The denouement comes as a surprise to the reader, even though the reader realizes, later, that there was a family history hinting at what might come...

As well as delineating male/female relationships and familial relationships, Weldon has many telling observations about current English/Western culture and mores. Yes, she's "ascerbic," but it's gratifying to read truly adult fiction--a bit wounding, a bit harsh, but overall truthful, and with gleams of humor along the way.
  • Honeirsil
I got this book by accident--I was on vacation in England and grabbed some British women's magazine off the rack in the gas station, thinking I would have a little mindless reading for the train ride. Well, in England a lot of magazines include free gifts, and this book was shrink-wrapped to it.

I expected this to be a silly romance novel, on the level of the ones Cosmopolitan prints excerpts from. I had never heard of Fay Weldon. So I was quite surprised to find a very, very darkly humorous and well-written novel.

The key is that NONE of the characters in this are sentimentalized at all. While Martyn and Hattie and Frances et. al. really do love each other, they are predominantly self-interested. Martyn is more concerned with the future of his political journalism career than with his partner's slow breakdown, Hattie is more concerned about being able to go back to work than with the obvious play Agnieszka is making for her common-law husband and child, Agnieszka is more concerned about getting to stay in England than by the damage this could cause Kitty in the long run, and even Baby Kitty, Weldon points out, loves best the person who attends to her needs the most.

That said, because the characters are so unlikeable (or very uncomfortably likeable), it's a hard novel to get into. Many people will be put off by the rather cavalier way mothers in three generations of this family leave their young children in the primary care of others. The mothers, simply put, aren't "motherly."

As to the people who claimed that the ending was a cop-out...uh, didn't you read the very beginning of the book? It was building all along...
  • Joony
At the moment anyway, I think this is the funniest book I have ever read. I'm listening to it in the car and am stared at because I'm often laughing out loud (and missing turns). I don't know how anyone can be so clever and insightful. She's poking fun at the educated liberal people like herself and her friends and relatives and me and my friends and relatives. I like them all, even Howard and his wife who think they owe it to the cosmos to have a baby, who couldn't help but turn out as brilliant as his/her parents. Wonderful to see how each generation of people in this book tried to save the world but in a different way. And yet for all their efforts, the world is not yet saved. Keep up the great work, Fay. If humor can do it, you'll save the world yet!