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Download Hey Yeah Right Get A Life eBook

by Helen Simpson

Download Hey Yeah Right Get A Life eBook
ISBN:
0099284227
Author:
Helen Simpson
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
English
Publisher:
Vintage Books / Random House; New Ed edition (2001)
Pages:
192 pages
EPUB book:
1896 kb
FB2 book:
1601 kb
DJVU:
1694 kb
Other formats
mbr docx txt mobi
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
679


Helen Simpson is the author of Four Bare Legs in a Bed, Dear George, Constitutional and In-Flight Entertainment.

Helen Simpson (Author). These ten stories poignant, perceptive, sometimes sad, and frequently funny display a multiplicity of London life glimpsed from buses, trains and the occasional taxi.

Simpson's the real thing. What were the US publishers thinking?

Simpson's the real thing.

Simpson's bleak verdict on the cost to women of raising small children does not preclude the possibility of humour. Simpson also prevents her unfaltering lament from turning into the dirge of self-pity by her exceptionally perceptive writing and her gift for the arresting image. All these stories are funny, even when their comedy is grotesque, grim or straight from the gallows. Her most fully realised character, Dorrie, stands at the end of each day like "an ancient vase, crackle-glazed, still in one piece but finely crazed all over its surface".

Nicholas Lezard on Helen Simpson's first-rate comedy about the perils of children, Hey Yeah Right Get .

Nicholas Lezard on Helen Simpson's first-rate comedy about the perils of children, Hey Yeah Right Get a Life. It's the kind of book you hope someone else reads: someone with some clout in social policy, and with the kind of vision to be able to prevent a generation going rancid with guilt or self-loathing. And I wonder how many childless people who read this book will go off and get themselves sterilised, just in case.

Helen Simpson's sixth short-story collection, Cockfosters, follows Four Bare Legs in a Bed (1990), Dear George (1995), Hey Yeah Right Get a Life (2000), Constitutional (2005) and In-Flight Entertainment (2010)

Helen Simpson's sixth short-story collection, Cockfosters, follows Four Bare Legs in a Bed (1990), Dear George (1995), Hey Yeah Right Get a Life (2000), Constitutional (2005) and In-Flight Entertainment (2010). A Bunch of Fives: Selected Stories (2012) includes five stories from each of her first five collections. She has received the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Hawthornden Prize and the .

Start by marking Hey Yeah Right Get A Life as Want to Read .

Start by marking Hey Yeah Right Get A Life as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Hey Yeah Right Get A Life. It's a brilliant, painful, funny and courageous book’ Esther Freud, Guardian. Helen Simpson has found a way to tell it, and I hope that people beyond the constituency margins are listening". Rachel Cusk, Evening Standard.

After reading Helen Simpson's snapshots of these hectic and energy-sapping lives, I was left feeling thoroughly exhausted myself and rather sad at the lack of support these women received from their husbands. Enough to make you think twice about parenthood! Find similar books Profile.

These ten stories poignant, perceptive, sometimes sad, and frequently funny display a multiplicity of London life glimpsed from buses, trains and the occasional taxi
  • Doukree
WONDERFUL!
  • Xanna
I brought the paperback of this book back from the UK and finally got around to reading it last month. It is simply one of the best-- funniest, best written, most trenchant, most important, most affecting-- story collections published in the last decade. Pretty much every story in it is about a thirtysomething woman with children; some of the women stay at home and have minds of mush, some of them have full-time jobs and are running high levels of frustration, guilt, or rationalization; all of them are an amazing and distinctive combination of real and repellent and attractive and flawed and sympathetic. Simpson's the real thing. I'm buying all her other books now. This one was published in the US but with its outstanding UK title rendered, dreadfully, as "Getting a Life." What were the US publishers thinking?