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by Joyce Carol Oates

Download Black Water eBook
ISBN:
0330326759
Author:
Joyce Carol Oates
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
English
Publisher:
PICADOR; New Ed edition (February 11, 1994)
Pages:
160 pages
EPUB book:
1360 kb
FB2 book:
1723 kb
DJVU:
1308 kb
Other formats
txt lit doc mobi
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
630


You would expect water in such a place to be shallow, just a ditch. You would not expect to be, so suddenly so rudely so helplessly, in the water black as muck and smelling of raw sewage.

You would expect water in such a place to be shallow, just a ditch. You would expect the guardrail to be more substantial.

Joyce Carol Oates gives us a mosaic, vivid vision, a luxuriant, rare glimpse into what it was like to be Kelly Kelleher in a desperate last flickering moment of life, to be swallowed by the black water of well-disguised usury, to feel one's mind cling to the final bastions of life and hope and womanly.

Joyce Carol Oates gives us a mosaic, vivid vision, a luxuriant, rare glimpse into what it was like to be Kelly Kelleher in a desperate last flickering moment of life, to be swallowed by the black water of well-disguised usury, to feel one's mind cling to the final bastions of life and hope and womanly need.

Joyce Carol Oates (born June 16, 1938) is an American writer. Oates published her first book in 1963 and has since published 58 novels, as well as a number of plays and novellas, and many volumes of short stories, poetry, and nonfiction. She has won many awards for her writing, including the National Book Award, for her novel them (1969), two O. Henry Awards, the National Humanities Medal and the Jerusalem Prize (2019)

Поиск книг BookFi BookFi - BookFinder. Download books for free. The Tattooed Girl: A Novel (Oates, Joyce Carol).

Поиск книг BookFi BookFi - BookFinder. Скачать (PDF) . Читать. The Journal of Joyce Carol Oates: 1973-1982. Literary Marriages: A Study of Intertextuality in a Series of Short Stories by Joyce Carol Oates.

Taut, powerfully imagined and beautifully written, Black Water ranks with the best of Joyce Carol Oates’s already long list of distinguished achievements. It can be read in a single afternoon, but, like every good book, it continues to haunt us. -The New York Times

Taut, powerfully imagined and beautifully written, Black Water ranks with the best of Joyce Carol Oates’s already long list of distinguished achievements. -The New York Times. Kelly Kelleher is an idealistic, twenty-six-year-old good girl when she meets the Senator at a Fourth of July party.

Joyce Carol Oates, Black Water. Gut wrenching is how I'd describe this book. It is very short and as you may have gleaned it essentially is based on Chappaquiddick and what happened that horrible night when the car went into the water. A blurb on the back of Black Water from the Los Angeles Times calls the book "the ballad of Chappaquiddick" and even though the internal chronology places this after 1990, in Maine not Massachusetts, the young woman involved is named "Kelly Kelleher" and the driver involved is only called "the In July of 1969, a car drove off a bridge into the tidal.

84 Responses to BLACK WATER (1992) by Joyce Carol Oates. Her suspense short stories have piqued my interest. And that incident – the one Oates addressed in this novel – has stayed in the American psyche for a very, very long time. Interesting I think how some things do and some don’t.

Joyce Carol Oates, Black Water Thank you for reading books on GrayCity. Joyce Carol Oates, Black Water. Thank you for reading books on GrayCity.

by. Joyce Carol Oates.

movies All Video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now! Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library. by. Drowning victims - Fiction, Young women - Fiction, Legislators - Fiction.

this road is so-" "I said don't worry, Kelly!"-a sidelong glance, a tight smile puckering the corners of blood-veined eyes-"we'll get there, and we'll get there on time. im of the plastic cup and onto Kelly Kelleher's leg before she could prevent it. The Senator had been among the three leading candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1988; out of political prudence he had withdrawn his name, released his delegates in favor of his old friend the Massachusetts governor

  • Thetalen
I am a big fan of Joyce Carol Oates. This short novel parallels the story of Ted Kennedy’s fateful car accident in Chappaquiddick years ago. The characters are similar, but not identical to Kennedy and Kopechne. The tale is told in a stream of consciousness style in which each chapter provides more vivid details about the the girl who is trapped the in cold and murky water when the car plunges off a bridge. It is very scary and compelling and tragic and we get to know both parties very well as Oates recounts the day of the tragedy in an excruciatingly detached way.
  • Goldendragon
I once read somewhere that Ms. Oates was fascinated with the moments before tragic death, those terrifying and confusing passages of time where seconds seem like hours, when a person realizes death is eminent but still holds dearly to the hope of a miraculous rescue. In searching for a vehicle to explore these emotions and adequately chronicle them in proper context, she actually stumbled upon the Chappaquiddick incident and realized, in an epiphany of sorts, that this would be the perfect forum in which to expand upon this chilling human drama. I have no idea if any of this is actually true but it was what drove me to purchase this work many years ago and, recently, while looking through my library for a short read, to take this up. And after completing it over a weekend, and with some mixed literary emotions, I’m somewhat satisfied in saying that this was an intense, somewhat intellectual but brilliantly paced novella that I would recommend to all.

Taking the Chappaquiddick incident and propelling it forward into the late 1980’s, Ms. Oates attempts to insert a certain modernity and novelistic flair into the already well-known plot; an overly entitled U.S. Senator (whose fictitious description throughout this storyline and name as it becomes revealed at the end does little to dissuade the reader from envisioning a young Ted Kennedy) meets a rather meek but nevertheless budding and strongly politick young woman (who I also fear Oates has described distinctly as a latter day Mary Jo Kopechne) at an exclusive, leftward leaning summer party on an upper class, Cape Cod-like Maine island, in which “The Senator” charms the young lady into leaving with him, after, of course, imbibing many a party spirit. Driving recklessly and drunkenly to reach a ferry that will take them to a hastily made reservation at a hotel on a “main island,” the Senator misjudges a sharp curve on an isolated road and smashes through a guardrail and into a marshland tributary where then the thrust of the novella begins.

Seen, from this point, almost entirely from the perspective of Kelly Kelleher, the young seduced woman, we’re then witness to her panicked, racing survival anticipations; over and over and page after page we’re drawn into her innermost dying perceptions, her hallucinations and her struggles for a precious air pocket within the slowly filling car, all the while being trapped by the carnage of the crushed vehicle against her fragile body. Although at times overly drawn out, these timorous periods are nevertheless truly captivating; the fear, anxiety and loss of hope are palpable throughout this discourse and keeps the reader locked into wondering what’s really happening and what’s actually illusionary in Kelly’s mind.

For criticism, I would only say that there is a certain repetitiveness in Kelly’s plight and an episodic nature to much of the novella…even with it being only one hundred and a half pages, this could have been cut to a feature magazine piece, in my opinion. Nevertheless, “Black Water” succeeds regardless of these quibbles and should be read by those interested in the human psyche…most will certainly take away a revelatory inner attribute from this work not before realized when read from this particular context.
  • Yannara
Fascinating novel based on an actual event, a senator takes a young girl out for a ride. Due to his reckless driving (he had been drinking all day)the car went through a "road closed" sign and disappeared into a large, marshy body of black water. The senator leaves the girl trapped in the car while he quickly escapes. He doesn't call for help; he just goes back to the "compound" and begs Peter Lawford to help him. "I'm in a real mess here," he told Lawford, "and you've got to get me out of it. This could ruin my career."
The novel stays focused, for the most part, on the young college student and her thought processes as the black water slowly overtakes her . The author takes you on a journey into the girl's thinking processes during this surreal, horrifying time as she waited and waited for "the Senator to come and rescue me."
The book started a little slow but, after a while, I couldn't put it down. It was so haunting, and after I read it, I couldn't stop thinking about it. It isn't a lengthy book, but the author used just as many pages as she needed. I got on Amazon and looked up true-life accounts
of Chappaquiddik and am starting a new book now.
  • Scream_I LOVE YOU
If you don't understand why Joyce Carol Oates is a literary pillar of our times, then you obviously have not read "Black Water." Go, right now, run to your computer, sink your literature-impoverished fingertips into its keys. Now! Before it's too late! If you don't, then you only have yourself to blame, and, the haggard, wrinkled figures that you see in your final thoughts, just may be attending angels in disguise.

There are great books and there are legendary books.

The poetry of the inner world. If there is any one feature only great books lack, it is this one. The legendary book flows like black water, a rising river wrought of soul-stained ink, overflowing, flooding, off the pages and into your veins, and then all through your body, endowing your mind with a new set of eyes, your heart with fluttering wings, your soul with tangoing poetry, all riding the raging black river, seeking to flood your literary life with dizzying oxygen. Black Water.

We are seized and yanked into the flood of a young woman's mind in the throes of an automobile accident, unnecessary, unexpected as death, her frailty, her fragility, her insecure passions, her desperate need for love and acceptance, her sensuality, her incredulity, her piteous hope, her clinging, final, muddy thoughts, her senseless tragedy, her whirling psyche, her dreams, her barrage of caressing memory, her ebullience of feeling, her tenacious stubborn final logic. Black Water.

Joyce Carol Oates gives us a mosaic, vivid vision, a luxuriant, rare glimpse into what it was like to be Kelly Kelleher in a desperate last flickering moment of life, to be swallowed by the black water of well-disguised usury, to feel one's mind cling to the final bastions of life and hope and womanly need. Black Water.

Why don't you see for yourself what a legendary author does with language. Read it or be forever impoverished.

Yours in literature,
J.G.C.