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Download The Eyre Affair eBook

by Jasper Fforde

Download The Eyre Affair eBook
ISBN:
034073356X
Author:
Jasper Fforde
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
English
Publisher:
New English Library; 1st edition (July 2001)
Pages:
384 pages
EPUB book:
1149 kb
FB2 book:
1256 kb
DJVU:
1998 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
471


The Eyre Affair is the debut novel by English author Jasper Fforde, published by Hodder and Stoughton in 2001.

The Eyre Affair is the debut novel by English author Jasper Fforde, published by Hodder and Stoughton in 2001. It takes place in an alternative 1985, where literary detective Thursday Next pursues a master criminal through the world of Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre. Fforde had received 76 rejections for earlier works before being accepted by a publisher. Critical reception of this novel was generally positive, remarking on its originality.

A Viking Book, published by arrangement with the author. This book may not be reproduced in whole or part, by mimeograph or any other means, without permission.

The Eyre Affair book. Really enjoyed the inventiveness of Jasper Fforde's The Eyre Affair

The Eyre Affair book. Really enjoyed the inventiveness of Jasper Fforde's The Eyre Affair. The premise of the story is that original manuscripts can be stolen and then changed, not just that manuscript, but all copies of say, Jane Eyre. Thus, these original manuscripts are viewed as absolute treasures. And there's also time travel.

The Eyre Affair takes place in an alternate version of 1985 England, where the Crimean war still continues between Russia and England, and . We interviewed Jasper Fforde on 2012-11-26

The Eyre Affair takes place in an alternate version of 1985 England, where the Crimean war still continues between Russia and England, and where Wales has declared independence. But there is more to the world that just the two above mentioned events. Technology has taken quite a leap forward in means of getting you kits to do somehow cloning and sequencing and bringing back extinct animals plock plock. We interviewed Jasper Fforde on 2012-11-26. The Eyre Affair Thursday Next: Book 1 .

The new standalone novel from Number 1 bestselling author Jasper Fforde. Every Winter, the human population hibernates. During those bitterly cold four months, the nation is a snow-draped landscape of desolate loneliness, and devoid of human activity. Three funny and fantastical novels following the adventures of Swindon's favourite literary detective, Thursday Next: THE EYRE AFFAIR, LOST IN A GOOD BOOK and THE WELL OF LOST PLOTS. A Thursday Next Digital Collection: Novels 1-5. by Jasper Fforde.

In this book, Jasper Fforde creates an alternative world that is often more believable (or at least, more enjoyable) than our reality.

Ships from and sold by pagingplaces. In this book, Jasper Fforde creates an alternative world that is often more believable (or at least, more enjoyable) than our reality. In Fforde’s creation, the dodo has been brought back to life (and is fast becoming a common pet), time travel is tricky but quite natural, and literature is paramount.

Mary Hamilton: Peculiarly well-suited to the Kindle, this novel is also perfect for those summers when you want to get away from your holiday. I read a scrappy, dog-eared paperback of Jasper Fforde's The Eyre Affair for the first time three years ago, curled up outdoors under a large tree and sneezing regularly in the summer pollen haze. I read it for the second time this summer on mostly stationary trains in the rain, as the first book I downloaded onto a brand new Kindle

How Thursday achieves this and manages to preserve one of the great books of the Western canon makes for delightfully hilarious reading.

Author: Jasper Fforde. Publisher: Penguin Books, 375 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10014, 2003. How Thursday achieves this and manages to preserve one of the great books of the Western canon makes for delightfully hilarious reading. You do not have to be an English major to be pulled into this story. You’ll be rooting for Thursday, Jane, Mr. Rochester-and a familiar ending.

James Joyce's Playlist - BBC Radio 4 - Продолжительность: 28:05 thenoiseitmakes Recommended for you.

There is another 1985, somewhere in the could-have-been, where the Crimean war still rages, dodos are regenerated in home-cloning kits and everyone is deeply disappointed by the ending of 'Jane Eyre'. In this world there are no jet-liners or computers, but there are policemen who can travel across time, a Welsh republic, a great interest in all things literary - and a woman called Thursday Next.In this utterly original and wonderfully funny first novel, Fforde has created a fiesty, loveable heroine and a plot of such richness and ingenuity that it will take your breath away.
  • Wymefw
In this book, Jasper Fforde creates an alternative world that is often more believable (or at least, more enjoyable) than our reality. In Fforde’s creation, the dodo has been brought back to life (and is fast becoming a common pet), time travel is tricky but quite natural, and literature is paramount. The importance of literature can be summed up by several instances, only a few of which I list here:

* Children trading bubble-gum cards of authors, not athletes
* Will-Speak vending machines which quote a bit of Shakespeare for a small price
* A performance of Richard III enacted weekly entirely by attendees
* Discussions, arguments, and downright religious fervor over several issues of literature, perhaps none so strident as those surrounding the true authorship of Shakespeare’s plays

Perhaps the most revealing point of the importance of literature, though, is given by the occupation of the heroine, Thursday Next. She works for Special Operations in England, specifically SpecOps 27, the Literary Detective Division. As part of her duties early on, she assists in the investigation of the theft of a first-edition Charles Dickens book.

The thief becomes evident quickly — Archeron Hades — Thursday’s former college professor, and an almost comically evil bad guy (he does bad things for the sheer joy of them — any monetary advantages are merely ancillary). But the motive is not known at first. As it turns out, one of Hades’ henchmen enters the book, pulls a minor character out of the book, and kills him. As he did this to a first edition, all copies of the book are thereafter irrevocably changed to the omission of that character.

Hades then threatens to start stealing other first editions and killing off major characters, thereby stripping the world of much of its great literature. Much of the remainder of the plot involves Hades’ entrance into *Jane Eyre* and Next’s attempts to foil his schemes and (hopefully) capture him.

In addition to having to chase down Hades, Thursday also has to deal with the Goliath Corporation, which claims to be a benevolent weapons contractor, but in reality, has a financial stranglehold on England. Whether they’re just a pain in the neck or truly one of the bad guys remains to be seen as the book unfolds.

As you can probably tell, it’s hard to classify *The Eyre Affair*. It blends so many genres — literature, mystery, detective, science fiction, fantasy, and humor. Some of the references and humor are fairly Anglo-centric — I only “got” them after some online investigations — but don’t diminish the story that much for the non-UK reader. Often this is seen in characters’ names — apparently Fforde delights in puns and plays on words — such as Thursday’s uncle Mycroft (named after Sherlock Holmes’ brother) or her boss, Braxton Hicks (named after the contractions that occur during pregnancy). Other non-name references come to mind, but they border on spoilers, so I won’t go into detail. Suffice it to say that the more well-informed you are, the more you’ll probably enjoy this book. I’d count myself as “not very”, but I still enjoyed *The Eyre Affair* immensely.
  • Haracetys
I liked this book so much in hardback I bought the Kindle too. This series of time-warped fantasy novels is riddled with literary references and side jokes that keep the reader tied in knots, not knowing whether he wants to turn the pages as fast as he can or linger as long as possible do the fun won't end. The plot revolves around the basic premise that there is a world of books which can be entered, from the real world, with predictably unpredictable results. Meanwhile in the "real" world, time travel and cloning of extinct species are only two commonplace happenings that differentiate it from that of the reader.
  • Flower
Think about your favorite book…the one you would live in if you could…the one you would never ever get tired of or want leave. Do you have it firmly in your mind??? Now imagine a world where others love books as much as you and they have found a way to travel inside the pages of said book OR pull characters out.

THIS is a world I would love to go to

THIS is a world made amazing by things like:

✘ Cloning kits for extinct species – Thursday has a pet Dodo version 1.2 you know before they started spicing in flamingos and other species.

✘ Bad guys who are somewhat similar to HE-WHO-MUST-NOT-BE-NAMED - "He has powers that are slightly baffling. That’s why we can’t say his name. I call it Rule Number One.” “His name? Why not?” “Because he can hear his own name—even whispered—over a thousand-yard radius, perhaps more. He uses it to sense our presence.”

✘ Genetically sequenced bookworms that have a semi conscience hive mind and eat prepositions and poop out punctuation, more so when they get excited. - "they had just digested a recent meal of prepositions and were happily farting out apostrophes and ampersands; the air was heav'y with th'em&"

✘ An uncle with wondrous and magical inventions in his basement lab including a car with a cameleon paint job, eye screen savers and a machine that takes away your memories....maybe it seems he has forgotten about it.

✘ A world where people don’t talk about what is on the television so much as they debate over who really wrote the works of Shakespeare and there are a good many theories floating around on that one.

✘ Plays that have cult followings like the Rocky Horror Picture show and the audience participates in the entire production.
“When is the winter of our discontent?” “Now,” replied Richard with a cruel smile, “is the winter of our discontent . . .”
“. . . made glorious summer by this son of York,” continued Richard, limping to the side of the stage. On the word “ summer” six hundred people placed sunglasses on and looked up at an imaginary sun.

✘ Thursday also has a father whose face it seems could stop time like literally. - "My father had a face that could stop a clock. I don’t mean that he was ugly or anything; it was a phrase the ChronoGuard used to describe someone who had the power to reduce time to an ultraslow trickle."

This book is for book lovers, like serious book lovers. It has a gazillion little play on words, literary references, and random shout outs to books that it was a fantastic treat for me. It would still be pretty enjoyable if you didn’t know a lot about most of the books mentioned but it is a little more fun if you are in on the hidden gems.

The plot really didn’t start happening until the second half of the book but I was having such a good time with all the fantastical gadgets, references and happenings that I didn’t really care.

However I totally enjoyed myself and liked the little bit of romance, chase of the bad guy and trip through the pages of Jane Eyre. I had a great time reading this and much like Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy there are a lot of random happenings that end up leading down a path to the plot eventually. It isn’t something I can read everyday but when in the correct mood it is a wonderful adventure.

This book wraps up nicely so that you could just stop the series here or chose to carry on.
  • Tygokasa
I enjoyed it, but I can see why people didn't.

It's a weird hybrid of alternate universe (a never ending Crimean War, Jane Eyre married St. John Ribvers), fantasy, time travel, and just zany in general.

The literary allusions are delightful (Richard III Rocky Horror style, I love it) and the way it twists in on itself is entertaining. It moved quickly, and I particularly love the ending.

The jump inside the book part doesn't occupy enough time, but it is nicely done - including the part where the heroine realizes she's made a major mistake.

Looking forward to other books in the series.