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Download El Infierno eBook

by Carlos Marinez Moreno

Download El Infierno eBook
ISBN:
0930523482
Author:
Carlos Marinez Moreno
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
English
Publisher:
Readers Intl; First Edition edition (August 1, 1988)
Pages:
266 pages
EPUB book:
1949 kb
FB2 book:
1427 kb
DJVU:
1371 kb
Other formats
rtf lrf doc docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
418


I knew nothing about Carlos Martinez Moreno's El Infierno when I bought it-I probably found it for pocket change at some discard sale .

I knew nothing about Carlos Martinez Moreno's El Infierno when I bought it-I probably found it for pocket change at some discard sale, and the brief blurbs on the cover made it a 'why not' purchase. I was particularly intrigued by the setting (Uruguay) and that it chronicled a period of unrest in that country with which I was completely unfamiliar-the struggles between government forces and the Tupamaro urban guerrillas. Moreno, a defense lawyer, actually wrote El Infierno while in exile; the book is heavily based on the experiences of the clients he defended while still in the country.

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Author Martínez Moreno, Carlos, 1917-. Categories: Nonfiction. 10/10 2. Books by Martínez Moreno, Carlos, 1917-: Los Prados De La Conciencia; Cuentos. Los Prados De La Conciencia; Cuentos.

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Carlos Martinez Moreno, along with Eduardo Galeano is one the important Uruguayan writers of the 20th . El Infierno is a chapter by chapter descent into the hell that Uruguay was during the military dictatorship in the seventies

Carlos Martinez Moreno, along with Eduardo Galeano is one the important Uruguayan writers of the 20th century. El Infierno is a chapter by chapter descent into the hell that Uruguay was during the military dictatorship in the seventies. Carlos Martinez Moreno, along with Eduardo Galeano is one the important Uruguayan writers of the 20th century. It is in the nature of a fictionalized documentary, and black and dark besides.

Ministerio Carlos Martinez was live. 5 July 2018 ·. Voses del infierno. Tema se llama Los anos pasan como un pensamiento. Ministerio Carlos Martinez. Dios quiera que estos temas le sea de bendicion. 40 views · 25 December 2018. 240 views · 14 June 2018.

Condition: Used: Good. 1a ed. Seller Inventory SONG9684292783. More information about this seller Contact this seller.

Carlos Martínez Díez (born 9 April 1986) is a Spanish footballer who plays as a right back for Burgos CF. He spent most of his professional career with Real Sociedad, appearing in 209 competitive matches and scoring three goals. He spent most of his professional career with Real Sociedad, appearing in 209 competitive matches and scoring three goals

Looking for a book by Carlos Martinez Moreno? Carlos Martinez Moreno wrote El Infierno, which can be purchased at a lower price at ThriftBooks. Books by Carlos Martinez Moreno.

Looking for a book by Carlos Martinez Moreno? Carlos Martinez Moreno wrote El Infierno, which can be purchased at a lower price at ThriftBooks.

Drawing on tape recordings, prisoners' affidavits, and various accounts of atrocities committed, this novel chronicles a decade of state terror in Uruguay under the Tupamaro urban guerrillas
  • Gralsa
I knew nothing about Carlos Martinez Moreno's EL INFIERNO when I bought it--I probably found it for pocket change at some discard sale, and the brief blurbs on the cover made it a 'why not' purchase. I was particularly intrigued by the setting (Uruguay) and that it chronicled a period of unrest in that country with which I was completely unfamiliar--the struggles between government forces and the Tupamaro urban guerrillas.

Moreno, a defense lawyer, actually wrote EL INFIERNO while in exile; the book is heavily based on the experiences of the clients he defended while still in the country. As such, the novel is not a novel per se, but more a collection of vignettes designed to evoke the terror and uncertainty of life during this period. Thankfully, in the paperback edition that I have, published in 1988 by Readers International, there is a short introduction that addresses the historical and literary context. Without that, I would have been completely lost, as Moreno's style--often a contextless stream-of-conscious peek inside one of his character's minds--was difficult for me to follow at times.

Readers familiar with Uruguayan history will no doubt have an easier time with his style and his references. For me, the ambiguity of the author's style worked against the book. While it was clear that this period in Uruguay sadly mirrored the post-war torture and terror of many other Latin American countries, midway through the book I began to drift through the pages due to the nebulous style.

I always feel uncomfortable rating a book that deals with such a horrific historical period like this, as assigning a star rating seems to pertain more to my enjoyment (or not) of a book rather than its importance; for appraising me of the pain of this period of time, I think it deserves five stars, but for someone as far removed in time and geography from the situation as I am, it may be that EL INFIERNO wasn't the best delivery system. Thus my rating of three stars is not a knock against the quality of the book, but rather an indication that it wasn't a very good match for me.
  • Bradeya
This book is so disturbing that it is difficult to read. The story of political prisoners torments in Uruguay is told with descriptions of tortures that will make you squirm. The editors of Publishers Weekly, as listed here, have give a pretty good synopsis of what this book is all about. As I would read this book I felt uncomfortable and would have to stop reading because I didn't want to know any more about the inhumane treatment. Although the book is captivating I could only handle one chapter at a time since it usually dealt with one person or group of individuals who were held captive. The human drama follows Dante's Inferno and begins each chapter with quotes from Dante's novel before you take a plunge into hell. The writting style is a little hard to follow at times but the book succeeds in raising questions about man's (in)tolerance of ideas different from theirs and to what extent will humans will fall to force their beliefs on others. It doesn't matter what side of the political spectrum you are on in a police state, the good guys are the bad guys and the bad guys are the good guys, nothing seems to be as it appears and everyone is fighting for justice with the end result being torture, injustice and an unswaying belief by all that they are right. The author, Carlos Moreno, draws from his own experiences as a defense attorney and recreates his clients stories with vivid realism that describes the conditions of hell on earth, of being held against one's will in Uruguay but not limited to this countries treatment of dissidents or opposition forces as many countries throughtout Latin America are intolerant of political change. This book will make you think not only about the cases of inhumanity in the 70's but will leave you wondering about what goes on now worlwide. This is definitely a book that is provocative but not exactly recreational reading, unless of course, you are willing to go to hell and back.