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by Douglas Wilson

Download What I Learned in Narnia eBook
ISBN:
1591280796
Author:
Douglas Wilson
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
English
Publisher:
Canon Press (November 23, 2010)
Pages:
172 pages
EPUB book:
1833 kb
FB2 book:
1693 kb
DJVU:
1624 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
963


What I Learned in Narnia book.

What I Learned in Narnia book. Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia with the observation, I have learned far more in Narnia than I can even begin to tell you. I hope you will read these books over and over for the rest of your life.

A fine book What I Learned in Narnia is a rich response to stories that hold a world of wisdom

Douglas Wilson knows that the best way to learn from the Narnia Chronicles is by approaching them as stories to be read and reread. Only when we freely enjoy them as tales of adventure will they ever truly edify. Love is the great opener of eyes, and this book is full of insights. -Michael Ward, author of Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of . Lewis and Chaplain of St Peter's College, Oxford. What I Learned in Narnia is a rich response to stories that hold a world of wisdom. Wilson draws forth that wisdom and shows it to us. - -Alan Jacobs, author of The Narnian: The Life and Imagination of C. S. Lewis and professor of English, Wheaton College.

Title: What I Learned in Narnia By: Doug Wilson Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 168 Vendor: Canon Press Publication Date: 2010.

Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia with the observation, 'This is not intended to be an introduction to Narnia at all, but is rather more like a conversation between good friends about some other good friends, talking about what a good time we all had and wh. Wilson highlights the practical themes of mature, Christian living that emerge from these classic tales-nobility, confession, complete grace-a joyful contrast to the thinness of modern life. Title: What I Learned in Narnia By: Doug Wilson Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 168 Vendor: Canon Press Publication Date: 2010.

What I Learned in Narnia. Written by Douglas Wilson. Narrated by Daniel Newman. Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia with the observation, "This is not intended to be an introduction to Narnia at all, but is rather more like a conversation between good friends about some other good friends, talking about what a good time we all had and wh. A must for any Narnia fan, young or old. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Douglas Wilson knows that the best way to learn from the Narnia Chronicles is by approaching them as stories to be read and reread.

Douglas James "Doug" Wilson (born June 18, 1953) is a conservative Reformed and evangelical theologian, pastor at Christ Church in Moscow, Idaho, faculty member at New Saint Andrews College, and author and speaker. Wilson is well known for. Wilson is well known for his controversial work Southern Slavery, As It Was, which he coauthored with League of the South co-founder Steve Wilkins.

Personal Name: Wilson, Douglas, 1953-. Download book What I learned in Narnia, Douglas J. Wilson. Publication, Distribution, et. Moscow, ID. Canon Press, (c)2010. Projected Publication Date: 1110.

Written by Douglas Wilson, Audiobook narrated by Daniel Newman . In Lucy's case, that other world was called Narnia, and though she was among the first to enter it, she was by no means the last. Millions of children (young and old) have followed her there and met its strange but wonderful inhabitants - Mr. Tumnus, Reepicheep, and Puddleglum, among others. But the lessons of Narnia don't just belong to the world of fiction and fantasy.

One rainy day, years ago, a little girl named Lucy discovered that the back of a wardrobe isn't always just the back of a wardrobe. Sometimes, it's a door into another world. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

One rainy day, years ago, a little girl named Lucy discovered that the back of a wardrobe isn't always just the back of a wardrobe. Sometimes, it's a door into another world.


In Lucy's case, that other world was called Narnia, and though she was among the first to enter it, she was by no means the last. Millions of children (young and old) have followed her there and met its strange but wonderful inhabitants--Mr. Tumnus, Reepicheep, and Puddleglum, among others.


But the lessons of Narnia don't just belong to the world of fiction and fantasy. We may never meet fawns, talking mice, or marshwiggles in our ordinary lives, but the lessons they teach in The Chronicles of Narnia are the very lessons we need to fight the battles we face in our everyday lives.


Douglas Wilson begins this series of meditations on C.S. Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia with the observation, "This is not intended to be an introduction to Narnia at all, but is rather more like a conversation between good friends about some other good friends, talking about what a good time we all had and why." Wilson highlights the practical themes of mature, Christian living that emerge from these classic tales--nobility, confession, complete grace--a joyful contrast to the thinness of modern life. A must for any Narnia fan, young or old.

  • Malhala
In his Introduction to "What I Learned in Narnia," Douglas Wilson states that his book "is rather more like a conversation between good friends about some other good friends, talking about what a good time we all had and why. But in order to have that conversation, we have to have the good time first." This is Wilson's way of saying that if you haven't read The Chronicles of Narnia books, then this isn't the book for you (yet).

Having said this, Wilson continues in his Introduction to remind the reader that while many good books have been wrecked by a rush to reduce the story to a moral it's also true that the best stories do indeed teach us. "What I Learned in Narnia" is Wilson's attempt to categorize some of the most important things he's learned by reading and re-reading the Narnia series. He's quite right to warn us that we'd better have read the series first because the book is an extended reflection on the meanings and truths of the entire Narnia series and relies heavily on details from the books in the series. While the Narnia series is a series of stories with embedded meaning and teaching, what Wilson has done has provided the reader with a very readable and thoughtful guide to some of the most important truths that the wise reader should come to understand through the experience of reading the Chronicles of Narnia.

Wilson's exposition is very clear and straightforward (perhaps even too prosaic) presentation of what he's learned. His writing style and organization make his book easy to digest. I'm sure his hope is that it will provide further reflection for C.S. Lewis' readers, as well as a motivation to read The Chronicles of Narnia again, this time with an eye to seeing some of its deeper meanings. Clarity and sound teaching are the great virtues of Wilson's book, and he's done a great service to Lewis' readers.

So just what has Wilson learned from The Chronicles of Narnia?

He divides what he's learned up into 7 sections, which I've outlined below. Keep in mind, however, that just as Wilson's discussion of the Narnia books is not the same as having read them for yourself, reading my outline is not the same as having read Wilson's book!

1. AUTHORITY - Authority is inescapable, and in the world of Narnia, there are multiple examples of both false and true authorities. Wilson also reminds us that true authority is humble and sacrificial, which he supports with specific characters and actions from the Narnia books. We also learn that authority and obedience go together.

2. CONFESSION OF SIN - It's refreshing to see that Wilson has recognized this in the Narnia books because one of the great omissions of the modern church and modern literature is a proper understanding of the gravity of sin and the importance of dealing with it. Just as there are both true and false authorities, there are also true and false confessions of sin.

3. NOBILITY - Wilson contends that we have lost the meaning of nobility, and in his third chapter he deals with: the fact that nobility is merry, nobility and appearance, nobility and sacrifice, and nobility and gift. There is, of course, also the false nobility of people like Jadis and the Calormen.

4. SPIRITUAL DISCIPLINES - Who would have thought that the spiritual disciplines would show up in Narnia? I'm grateful to Wilson for having seen this where, once again, so many Christians miss this both in life and in their reading of Narnia. In this chapter, Wilson focuses especially on "The Silver Chair" and the importance of remembering. As Aslan tells Jill before he sends her off into Narnia: "Remember the signs and believe the signs. Nothing else matters." Wilson also deals with disciplines and pleasure; disciplines, grace, and forgiveness; and the reward of discipline.

5. LOVE OF STORY - There has been a resurgence in narrative theology and in postmodernism of an interest in story or narrative. In Chapter 5, Wilson deals with the importance of story, stories as preparation, loving stories, twisted stories, and the real story. In so doing, the reader is receiving an education in how to read, and for this we should thank Doug Wilson.

6. THOROUGH GRACE - No Christian story and no discussion of the work of C.S. Lewis would be complete without a discussion of grace. We are all aware of the grace of Aslan's sacrifice in "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe," but grace abounds in other places in Narnia as well.

7. LOVE FOR ALSAN, LOVE FOR GOD - A wise reading of The Chronicles of Narnia must involve an understanding of how characters enter into a relationship with Aslan, just as man must enter into a relationship with God. Knowledge of Aslan in the Narnia books may also be true or false, but in the end Aslan is meant to lead us to Christ.

While Wilson's book lacks depth, he makes up for this by having covered so many different topics so well. "What I Learned in Narnia" is like a primer on how to read The Chronicles of Narnia more wisely; understood in this light, this is an excellent book. Many books have been written about the works of Lewis and about Narnia, but Doug Wilson's "What I Learned in Narnia" is one of the simplest and best. It does, however, lack a certain amount of vibrancy and imagination.
  • Made-with-Love
Five stars in my book indicate the x-factor. This book of Douglas Wilson is deceptively brilliant. When one looks at the title you could be excused if you thought nothing more is to be expected than some noble thoughts about some striking passages in the Narnia series. But Douglas Wilson does not only write with his usual striking clarity in this book. There is a definite alluring quality on display. I can think of at least three ways that make this work exceptional. Firstly, time and again you are amazed at how the author succeeds in stating simple things with new profundity. For example, think of how often we are tempted to confess other people's sins and not our own. And have you ever thought about the analogy between children's ease in learning their mother tongue and Christian kids learning their Father's ways? Many times I have wondered over the years about the advantage/disadvantage of growing up in Church. Enters Wilson with a book for kids and gives me an analogy that I have never considered before. He constantly notices things that is only possible from many readings over many years in tandem with life in the ministry. And of course you think more than twice: Why didn't I think of that before? This already brings the second point to the fore. Doug Wilson also displays a special gift of interpreting Lewis in a way that contributes to and advances the implications of Lewis's writings. And thirdly Wilson writes with the same kind of mysterious quality that Lewis had. Something subtle in the powers of the analogical imagination is on supportive display in this book. It is no wonder that one of the reviewers can state that it was one of the most strengthening books of the year. And as to one reviewer who thought there was some lack of depth, I am not so sure this is a fair statement. We have to take the initial audience into account - kids you know. And Wilson does point to Michael Ward's classic in his intro for those who want to go higher up and further in. But do not think that this book is only for kids. It is the same type that Lewis describes as becoming interesting again when you get old enough. In my opinion Wilson is writing here in the simple-yet-profound genre. Within this genre he is writing for kids, but he is using the suggestive forces of the imagination in striking ways to introduce Lewis and the meaning of his writings to kids of all ages between 8 and 88. Highly recommended.
  • Rude
People don't get five stars from me by grace but by works. And Doug Wilson has done it with this grace-filled little volume. I love Narnia, and the worst thing you could do to it would be to skip to its lessons before enjoying its stories. But once you've enjoyed the stories, a little help distilling the lessons is welcome. And Wilson, an excellent writer (and, like Lewis, apologist) in his own right, provides just that help. This was one of the most spiritually uplifting reads of the year for me.
  • Kulalbine
I'd recommend that both the series be read aloud to kids and this book as well. I've been so blessed by this. It makes magnificent distinctions that bubble over into everyday life.
I pity those who see the Narnia series as merely stories... they have very deliberate characters with tendencies and Lewis was ahead of his time and gave proper jabs at dangerous schools of thought.

This book is a magnificent read that helps Narnia become cherished and woven into your own childhood.

It helps boys become godly/responsible men and girls into respectful ladies who can never be turned into a slave mentally.
  • Nikojas
Good book. Typical Wilson style. Draws out some things you might not notice otherwise.
  • Bluddefender
If you're already a fan of Narnia, as I am, go ahead and add this to your collection. Like all the books I've read from Wilson, the chapters are short, tight, and to the point. He really knows how to pack it all in. Recommended.
  • Hrguig
This book is an outstanding discussion of the Chronicles of Narnia series by C.S. Lewis. Pastor Wilson provides an excellent analysis of the major themes of this series and an insightful elaboration by highlighting examples in these C S. Lewis books. Reading this book has allowed me to more fully appreciate the amazing genius of C.S. Lewis
Great book! From an awesome communicator of Truth!!