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Download Karma Incarnate: The Best of Foolkiller eBook

by Bryan Gibson

Download Karma Incarnate: The Best of Foolkiller eBook
ISBN:
141961990X
Author:
Bryan Gibson
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
English
Publisher:
BookSurge Publishing (January 23, 2006)
Pages:
162 pages
EPUB book:
1280 kb
FB2 book:
1110 kb
DJVU:
1860 kb
Other formats
lrf txt mbr docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
598


Karma Incarnate book. His first book, Karma Incarnate: The Best of Foolkiller, was published in 2006; his second, Malefectus and Bryan Gibson is a Harlem native who currently resides in Jersey City, New Jersey.

Karma Incarnate book. In 1998 he attended the Hurston/Wright Writers Workshop in Richmond, Virginia, and in 2002 was featured in Gumbo: An Anthology of African American Writing, where he received high praise from Publisher's Weekly.

His first book, Karma Incarnate: The Best of Foolkiller, was published in 2006; his second, Malefectus and Lesser . In Foolkiller Bryan Gibson takes you on a thought provoking journey

His first book, Karma Incarnate: The Best of Foolkiller, was published in 2006; his second, Malefectus and Lesser Tales, in 2007; and, in 2009, his work will be featured in E. Lynn Harris' Love Is Stronger Than Pride, a collection of five novellas. In Foolkiller Bryan Gibson takes you on a thought provoking journey. Through the demons of a man’s fading hold on reality or memory we are challenged to look at our own demons within and without. The main character is an aging Joseph Tally. He recounts a history of violence and espionage on a self-assigned mission as a "Foolkiller" to his son.

Karma Incarnate is about a man, Joseph Tally, who is slowly losing himself to Alzheimer's, but before he vanishes .

Karma Incarnate is about a man, Joseph Tally, who is slowly losing himself to Alzheimer's, but before he vanishes completely, he reveals to his son a secret life of shadows and death: . .for thirty years I've been a soldier in a secret war, a rogue agent moving stealthily beyond the reach of my government. must for the greater good-it is why I a. Throughout this work, readers will be struggling to determine if what he tells his son is true, or a delusion, an effect of the disease; but whether believed or doubted, the father's words are a revelation.

A few years ago the comedian Bill Cosby addressed an issue which has long been discussed within the African American community: the responsibility of certain blacks to not behave like stereotypes.

The Best of Foolkiller. Published January 23, 2006 by BookSurge Publishing. Joseph Tally had spent nearly an hour conversing with the video-store clerk, a red-haired boy of about twenty who wore his Blockbuster name tag proudly: "Patrick," it read.

Karma Incarnate: The Best of Foolkiller. by Bryan Gibson 23 January 2006.

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A few years ago the comedian Bill Cosby addressed an issue which has long been discussed within the African American community: the responsibility of certain blacks to not behave like stereotypes. Cosby’s outspokenness made public a topic that had mostly been a private one, and the discourse that followed was observed in newspapers and magazines, on radio and television: these featured the thoughts of many who argued for or against Cosby’s statement, and their vehemence—their need to confirm or counter his view—leads us to Bryan Gibson’s first novel, Karma Incarnate: The Best of Foolkiller.

Karma Incarnate is about a man, Joseph Tally, who is slowly losing himself to Alzheimer’s, but before he vanishes completely, he reveals to his son a secret life of shadows and death: “…for thirty years I’ve been a soldier in a secret war, a rogue agent moving stealthily beyond the reach of my government. I changed my name, of course; the name I had no longer suited me: I changed my name, date of birth, and social security number—indeed, Jumoki, I became a new man...but I remained the killer of fools.” Obsessed with James Bond and Friedrich Nietzsche, Tally fuses these obsessions with one more: concern, both for his people and his community, recalling haunting, often violent “missions” whose goal is the end of harmful stereotypes, and the elimination those of who perpetuate them: “The kill, no matter its necessity, never brings me joy, nor anything close to it; but I do what I must for the greater good—it is why I am.” Throughout this work, readers will be struggling to determine if what he tells his son is true, or a delusion, an effect of the disease; but whether believed or doubted, the father’s words are a revelation.

  • Mikarr
Wow, just wow. I read the book in 2 days. It was a page turner. The story wove fantasy and reality together in a strange way - or was it all fantasy, or was it all reality? Things that make you go Hmmm......

I especially like the different types of fools discussed in the book. The fools, and the reasons why these characters were fools, is something that isn't often talked about in our community. When it is, it's usually discussed in a holier-than-thou OR you-ain't-better-than-me/us manner. In my opinion, it was discussed in a way that each fool was seen as equally negative.

Hopefully what I just said makes some sense. Great book. My only complaints were that it wasn't long enough (I wanted more more more!) and that I didn't fully understand the ending (was it meant to be understood, though?). I've already recommended it to one person and will be recommending it to many others.
  • Samardenob
Loved this book. It was engaging, suspenseful, and smart. To be 100% honest, it was a bit difficult to follow at times, but I enjoyed it nonetheless.
  • Erennge
In Foolkiller Bryan Gibson takes you on a thought provoking journey. Through the demons of a man’s fading hold on reality or memory we are challenged to look at our own demons within and without.

The main character is an aging Joseph Tally. He recounts a history of violence and espionage on a self-assigned mission as a "Foolkiller" to his son.

Bryan Gibson does a wonderful job of delivering the metaphor of the Black man’s burden as Joseph describes each mission. Switching from first to third person we are introduced to figures that Joseph has identified as belonging to “one of three types of Negroes the rest of us can do without.” But he is a Foolkiller and every fool isn’t a Negro. This unique style keeps up the momentum and I found myself experiencing my own frustrations with American culture from a different perspective.

Gibson has an eloquent command of poetic description that gave me chills at some points and revulsion at others. He betrays a passion that I find lacking in many of the books by young authors today.

The state of Joseph Tally’s mind became less important as I digested his philosophy that justified his actions toward those he judged. The character represents the silent wishes of many in the Black community that see a people dying for lack of a decision to live. But of course it isn’t that simple and just as the base desire to simply eliminate the problem fades with a good look at reality; so does the enigmatic character of Joseph Tally. However, as you will see at the end, he refuses to go completely away as you will be compelled to search the pages again for a better understanding of the Foolkiller.
  • Malakelv
First let me apologize for any typos or fragments that I may display in this message. I'm a busy mom, so sleeping is a luxury.

Your book was amazing, Mr. Gibson. I truly loved it. I was so impressed with the story line. I am a fan of a Soldier's Story, so your analogy of the Sarge aka Joseph Tally was beautiful. Your story touched base on a lot of issues that plague African-Americans today. I know for a fact that many times I feel like Joseph Tally and want to get rid of the "fools" I encounter on a regular basis. By the way, your breakdown of the coyote and roadrunner was "Super Genius".

When reading your book, the question I kept asking of Joseph was "Who gave you the right to judge?" That question often plagued me when watching A Soldier's Story as well. The Foolkiller reminds us of all the residue of slavery that haunts our people, and how we dont even realize it. They say that after a year of being captured, brainwashed and raped, Elizabeth Smart suffered from "Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome", can you imagine what generations of suffering (from the slave trade to now) has done to us?

Your story brought up so many valid points, and it is truly a story that we as a people need to read. Even if one doesn't truly agree with it, it makes you think. Which is vital when reading anything, I believe. Pardon my fragments and grammar. I have not been blessed with the writing skills that you possess. Your wording was filled with so much texture. Even if I wasn't a Harlemite, I would still be able to see and smell what you wrote.

I would just like to thank you for blessing me with that bulletin on MySpace that led to the purchase of a wonderful story. If you have any more let me know, so I can add it to my library.

One more thing. I know why they dont want to publish your book. It was never their intention to teach the slaves or their descendants. Like Fredrick Douglass said, he was free from slavery when he learned how to read. They want to keep us deaf ,dumb and blind. Because if we ever were to wake up, what a war it would be. This is why they just want us to read more Homo Thug, and My life as a prostitute garbage. You are truly talented, Mr. Gibson, and I wish you much success!
  • Winn
After first coming across this writer's work in E Lynn Harris' Gumbo (which was three or four years ago), where he proved his skills both powerfully and eloquently, I'd been waiting for something, anything, else from him--and finally, here is it is! Karma Incarnate is actually both a novel and a series of short stories entwined; it's like nothing I've ever read: it's literary but at the same time profane, violent, provoking, and all served up with an intense gallows' humor that had me both smiling and horrified. Be warned: This book is not for the delicate, and should be read with an open mind. The best way to sum up Gibson's work: It kicks ass and takes names; and, as his readers, we've little to do but enjoy the ride. Have fun y'all!