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by Harold Robbins

Download the Stallion eBook
ISBN:
0671855743
Author:
Harold Robbins
Category:
Contemporary
Language:
German
Publisher:
Pocket Books (1996)
EPUB book:
1434 kb
FB2 book:
1517 kb
DJVU:
1479 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
373


Harold Robbins (May 21, 1916 – October 14, 1997) was an American author of popular novels.

Harold Robbins (May 21, 1916 – October 14, 1997) was an American author of popular novels. Robbins was born Harold Rubin in New York City, the son of Frances "Fannie" Smith and Charles Rubin. His parents were well-educated Jewish emigrants from the Russian Empire, his father from Odessa and his mother from Neshwies, south of Minsk.

Harold Robbins, a novelist known for steamy passion in his works, stirs up passion of a different. Page 4. Harold Robbins. 38 MB·624 Downloads·New!. 68 MB·2,834 Downloads. 46 MB·494 Downloads·New!.

Continuing the phenomenal story in The Betsy, The Stallion reintroduces the Hardeman family and the cutthroat world of their vast automobile empire, where the stakes are high and every man, and woman, is a gambler. Loren Hardeman, known as Number One, is gradually transferring control of Bethlehem Motors to his grandson, Loren Hardeman III-a man possessed with his father’s cunning, but sadly lacking in his ability to go for the kill.

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Harold Robbins once said, For me, the goal is always to make the page disappear and speak to my reader face to face as each character comes to life. The 1962 novel that rocked Hollywood to its core is finally back in print. Ripped from the headlines, Where Love Has Gone is inspired by the real-life murder of Johnny Stompanato, Lana Turner’s lover, who was allegedly stabbed by the actress’ daughter.

Continuing the phenomenal story in The Betsy, The Stallion reintroduces the Hardeman family and the cut-throat world of their vast automobile empire, where the stakes are high and every man, and woman, is a gambler.

Author Robbins, Harold. Books by Robbins, Harold: The Predators. 10 7. 10. The Betsy (1971). The Stallion (1996). 8, 10. A Stone for Danny Fisher (1952).

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Mobile version (beta). If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. Charles Dickens Great Expectations (Bloom's Guides). Harold Bloom, Sarah Robbins.

List of the best Harold Robbins books, ranked by voracious readers in the Ranker community

List of the best Harold Robbins books, ranked by voracious readers in the Ranker community. With commercial success and critical acclaim, there's no doubt that Harold Robbins is one of the most popular authors of the last 100 years. Having sold over 750 million copies of his many books, Robbins. List of the best Harold Robbins books, ranked by voracious readers in the Ranker community. Having sold over 750 million copies of his many books, Robbins is one of the best-selling authors of all time.

A sequel to The Betsy. Loren Hardeman I is alive and well, but power over the Bethlehem Motor empire is now passing to his grandson. Loren Hardeman III has innate cunning, but lacks decisiveness. When outsider Angelo Perino challenges him, his grandfather invites Perino back into the firm.
  • Vathennece
As with most of Robbins books, sex sells. This book probable shocked the era in which it was first published but is a bit hum drum now.
  • Mezilabar
I had read other Harold Robbins books and this carries on in the same mode; uses sex to fill story gaps and the characters are not completely true to the originals in The Betsy.
  • Opithris
"The Betsy," one of Robbins early '70s potboilers, wasn't one of my favorites, but it delivered, weaving a fast-paced tale of corporate intrigue and family drama, with plenty of raunchy sex to satisfy my prurient interests. Its sequel, "The Stallion," published 25 years later, continues the saga of Bethlehem Motors, and it's a pretty entertaining read, even if it's not much of a novel. After some preliminary chapters that function much like the 30-second recap of a TV show's previous episode, "The Stallion" settles into its two primary narrative drives: former race car driver Angelo Perino's reluctant return to Bethlehem Motors to build a car that will save the company he resents, and Bethlehem Motors CEO (and grandson of the company founder) Loren Hardeman III's attempts to undermine Perino, simply because he hates him. Perino struggles to build the titular Stallion, fighting against corporate apathy and, in the case of Loren III, open hostility, but he's not so busy that he doesn't have time to bed Loren III's wife Roberta, who's got a fondness for S/M and Chesterfield cigarettes, or Loren's daughter Betsy, who's got a fondness for, well, pretty much everything save using birth control on a regular basis. Between sexually satisfying his boss's wife and daughter, Angelo also manages to bed Betsy's mother and her aunt, as well as father numerous children with his own wife Cindy (she shrugs off her husband's affairs, using them as a convenient excuse for her own dalliances). And even lesbians are powerless to resist Angelo's virile charms!

So, yes, "The Stallion" has a lot of sex. It's Harold Robbins, so there's no point complaining about it, and a bit disingenuous besides, considering it's those abundant sex scenes that are part of his books' appeal. (Don't try to deny it!) But it's not the copious amount of sex scenes that hurts "The Stallion"; it's Robbins' ham-fisted way of introducing them, choosing to thrust them (as it were) into chapters rather than allow his seductions to develop organically. There are times when "The Stallion" actually threatens to become, if not a good novel, at least a satisfying bit pulp fiction, but "The World's Greatest Storyteller" instead settles on being the World's Most Tired Pornographer.

Other observations:
* According to Robbins, when entering into an underhanded business arrangement with a member of the opposite sex, it is customary to seal the deal with a slap-happy roll in the hay.
* Robbins' characters usually have a fondness for whatever drug is popular at the time of writing (pot in the `70s, coke in the `80s), but with the exception of a little bit of pot smoking, the characters in "The Stallion" prefer indulging their libidos to altering their mental states.
* In "The Stallion," it's Europeans who are sexually repressed while in freedom-loving America boys parade around in Speedos ("displaying their proud bulges"), the girls cheerfully go topless, and no one is judged for his or her sexuality. Who knew?

It's been recounted how Robbins would be locked in hotel rooms by his editors and not allowed to come out until he produced a certain number of manuscript pages. Given how some key plot points are introduced in "The Stallion" and then quickly dismissed (two murders with no consequences, a murder-for-hire plot that goes nowhere), it seems Harold was desperate to get out of that room. That said, "The Stallion" is hardly the worst book Robbins ever wrote. No, unfortunately his editors didn't see fit to lock him OUT of that hotel suite before he cranked out his next book, "Tycoon."
  • Nalmetus
Harold Robbins' sequel to the lukewarm THE BETSY brings back protagonist to the ladies Angelo Perino for yet another tale of use or be used, this time in the automobile business. The author's paint-by-the-numbers plot doesn't miss a beat in delivering comfort zone forte: lesbianism, sadomasochism, nymphomania, orgies, you name it you got it, again. His auto industry wheelings and dealings, however, do stand out, especially when writing about the evolution of the first electric car, the XB 000. A broader development of the subject definitely would have set a better tone for the novel, but, alas, Robbins chooses sexual predictability over substance. Ditto for his characterization. Nothing but carbon copy material for his Angelo: macho, good looking, well-endowed, a master in his field as well as in the bedroom... Still, THE STALLION is a fun time-waster when taken with a grain of salt. It may not be Robbins best (that would be most of his pre-80's releases), but it is entertaining nonetheless if expectations aren't set too high.-----Martin Boucher
  • Flathan
The Stallion is fairly a new novel compared with others written by the Harold Robbins. Once again, Robbins has proved his genius skill as a story teller. The Stallion revolves around the guy Angelo Perino, who is gathers his life after being dumped by the company he worked for, and takes his revenge. Don't forget to add lots of sex, money, and luxuries that only Harold Robbins can imagine vividly. Though I read the so called prequel "The Betsy" after reading "The Stallion", you actually don't miss much of any storyline, so even if you have not read "The Betsy" it is ok to go ahead and read this book.

My all time favorite is "Dreams Die First" and "The Stallion" comes second. If you are a fan of Robbins (like me), then don't look any further, grab a copy and read it.
  • Golkree
This is the world's greatest story teller? My God, what have we evolved to? This is no more than a sordid sex manual. Believe it or not, almost every page has a sex scene. This is truly a piece of trash. Remove all the sex and you remove half the narrative. Does it sell then? Probably not because it is only the sex that keeps the novel moving; and, of course, without the sex it would no longer be Harold Robbins. So give the man credit: he's found a style that attracts millions to his books. But me, only once. Thank heavens it was a library rental. And thank heavens I had the good sense to discard it long before I had finished it. I have absolutely no doubts that were this book a movie, it would be rated "X." Honestly!
  • Kecq
As a long time fan of Harold Robbins, I've read most of his more popular novels, but not The Betsy, which is the precursor to The Stallion. However, one not need have read the former to understand what is going on in the latter. The Stallion is vintage Harold Robbins, and IMO, one of his best stories. I couldnt help but wonder whether the XB electric car in the story was a case of art imitating life or vice versa. Whichever you choose, it was a fascinating insight into the world of sports cars.
This is really a great book. I cannot tell you how much I enjoyed it. I actually had not read, its precurser, The Betsy so was unfamiliar with the background information, charactors etc. This was not a problem as all things became obvious just by reading the book. It is not a hard book to understand. Its got all the hallmarks that make a Robbins a great and entertaining read. Reviewing The Stallion makes me want to read it again!