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by Abd al-Rahman Munif,Peter Theroux

Download Cities of Salt eBook
ISBN:
0099388111
Author:
Abd al-Rahman Munif,Peter Theroux
Category:
Contemporary
Publisher:
Vintage; New Ed edition (August 18, 1994)
Pages:
628 pages
EPUB book:
1614 kb
FB2 book:
1322 kb
DJVU:
1431 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
765


1987 ^ a b Munif, Abd al-Rahman (1988). London: Quartet Books. Munif biography in Peter Theroux's translation – Abdelrahman Munif (1987). Translated by Peter Theroux.

Cities of Salt (Cities of Salt Trilogy, Vol 1), New York: Vintage Books. The Trench (Cities of Salt Trilogy, Vol 2), New York: Vintage Books. Variations on Night and Day (Cities of Salt Trilogy, Vol 3), New York: Vintage Books. a b Munif, Abd al-Rahman (1988). New York: Vinatage International. p. 629. ISBN 0-394-75526-X.

Cities of Salt is a novel by Abdul Rahman Munif. It was first published in Beirut in 1984 and was immediately recognized as a major work of Arab literature. It was translated into English by Peter Theroux. The novel, and the quintet of which it is the first volume, describes the far-reaching effects of the discovery of huge reserves of oil under a once-idyllic oasis somewhere on the Arabian peninsula.

Ships from and sold by allnewbooks. cities of salt saudi arabia way of life wadi al-uyoun middle east peter theroux point of view banned in saudi middle eastern swimming pools tells the story discovery of oil arab world book is not banned great book arab country translated into english modern arab oasis community get to know.

The promise inherent in the creation of a city divided into Arab and American sectors provides the novel's most striking revelation: here not . Bibliographic information. Cities of Salt: A Novel. Translated by. Peter Theroux.

The promise inherent in the creation of a city divided into Arab and American sectors provides the novel's most striking revelation: here not merely two cultures, but two ages, meet and stand apart. Alternatively amused and bewildered by the Americans and their technological novelties, the Arabs sense in their accommodation to modernity the betrayal of their own traditions. Highly recommended, if only for its cross-cultural insights. Lewis, Library Journal.

The small settlement of Wadi al-Uyoun is turned upside down, its oasis, trees, and houses destroyed, its residents forced out. We are introduced to Miteb and his wife and children, who will disappear as other characters are introduced in episodic fashion. Miteb is driven fairly insane by the destruction of his village, and rides away into the desert on his camel. Peter Theroux's translation does a great job of capturing Munif's approach to this world, and his plain, rhythmical prose is beautiful.

Cities of salt is a historical fiction book set in an unnamed Arab country .

Cities of salt is a historical fiction book set in an unnamed Arab country during the first half of the 20th century. It describes the changes in the place, a semi-arid desert, and its local Muslim inhabitants over this time period. CITIES OF SALT is a highly unusual novel because unlike most, its main character is not a human being, but a city, even a country or a culture.

The remarkable life and literary career of Abd al-Rahman Munif, author of the Cities of Salt quintet. Sabry Hafez charts the emergence of Munif's searing fictions. Evocations of desert traditions, foreign interference, the deformities of despotism and lessons of resistance. In spite of partition: Jews, Arabs, and the limits of separatist imagination.

by. ʻAbd al-Raḥmān Munīf.

Cities of salt: a novel/ Abdelrahman Munif; translated from the Arabic by Peter Theroux. 1st Vintage International cd. cm. Translation of: Cities of salt. U514M84131989 CIP 892'. 736-dc19 Manufactured in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 To Ali Munif who departed too soon 0 0 0 TRANSLATOR'S ACKNOWLEDGMENTS am deeply indebted to two people for their help: to my brother Paul for his invaluable support and encour­ agement, and to Nayef Al-Rodhan, M. D., whose pa­ tient. It was translated into English by Peter Theroux

Cities of Salt is a novel by Abdul Rahman Munif. The novel, and the quintet of which it is the first volume, describes the far-reaching effects. Cities of Salt is a novel by Abdul Rahman Munif.

Banned in Saudi Arabia, this is a blistering look at Arab and American hypocrisy following the discovery of oil in a poor oasis community.
  • shustrik
This is one of the first of many I read about Arabia, the Empty Quarter & Bedouins. It is an excellent book which I am rereading but the heavy hard cover is really painful. It's a long novel based on facts about a village which is affected by the oil companies. The spread of oil drilling is like a cancer & the morals of the Westerns is in question as to what they did to a culture & how they behaved in front of a
foreign culture. It's an eye opener & was banned in Saudi Arabia.
I highly recommend for the truth about oil in the Middle East & for the authors style of writing. It's translator was excellent.
  • Worla
I realize the translator has been critical of reviews that suggest that this novel is about oil. Okay, so it is not about oil, but it is about an oil boom, particularly the impact that the boom has on the small Bedouin community where it takes place. Munif's boom has much in common with oil booms that took place in Pennsylvania and Texas and with the gold rush that initially began on Gen. Sutter's ranch in California, as related in Blaise Cendrars' "Gold." What sets this novel apart is that it is placed in the Arabian Desert, a place of which most westerners (including myself) have known very little. In beautiful prose, Munif exposes the culture of this oasis village bit by bit, character by character. The village, perhaps like most of Saudi Arabia, is extremely conservative. Before the arrival of the oil explorers, the Bedouins had experienced almost no exposure to other customs, styles of dress, religious beliefs or technologies. Employment by the oil company puts some money in the Bedouins' pockets, but - as one might expect - not without upsetting their social order. The oilmen, of course, are as ignorant of the Bedouins' culture as the Bedouins are of theirs. "Theirs" being, one supposes, America. The story begins in the 1930s, which happens to be the same decade in which American geologists from Standard Oil of California discovered oil in Saudi Arabia. Munif does not directly reveal that, but it seems clear enough that his novel - which is the first of a trilogy - is the story of that discovery and the subsequent formation of ARAMCO, the oil giant. The story is told through the eyes of the Bedouins. The oilmen and the Saudi royal family are seen, for the most part, as the Bedouins' adversaries. Munif maintains a continuous flow of events that render the cultural changes understandable. His main characters are three-dimensional, and by the novel's end Munif has acquainted the reader with his main characters and with life in this rural Saudi culture.

About halfway through this novel, I decided I like it enough to order the second book of the trilogy. But I subsequently changed my mind because I became frustrated with having to learn so many characters. Within 600 pages Munif introduces about 300 characters, often without a hint as to whether a particular character will become a main figure or will only receive one mention. As a result, I found myself having to underline names, making lists, and frequently backing up to figure out exactly who a particular character was. Perhaps my diligence was overkill, but I am not sure I would have understood the novel adequately without doing that. Had it not been for the "over-charactered" aspect, I would have rated this novel a 5-star. It does, however, rate at least a 4 because, in an entertaining and enlightening way, it presents a perfectly believable picture of what happens to a community with roots in antiquity when it is dragged into a modern century.
  • Fordg
Cities of salt is a historical fiction book set in an unnamed Arab country during the first half of the 20th century. It describes the changes in the place, a semi-arid desert, and its local Muslim inhabitants over this time period. Specifically, it shows how the local Arab communities are changed for the worse by the intrusion of Western individuals, Western corporations, and Western society as embodied by the oil corporations.

This society begins as an egalitarian community based on family ties and extended kinships. Everybody knows and trusts each other. Gates, land titles and other ways in which individuals divide up resources do not exist, and all is shared in common. Likewise guns and violence are almost non-existent as conflicts are solved slowly and surely by long and lengthy discussions.

Then Western geologists enter the scene and discover oil. Western oil corporations are quick to follow. To get access to the oilwells, and to ship them out via pipelines requires control of land, which of course is communally owned and used. To solve this dilemma, the corporations try to cajole and bribe the locals to give up rights to these lands. This often did not work, so the corporations resort to a tactic that was used against Native Americans and Africans in the previous four centuries. Specifically, the local tribes had nominal leaders. The corporate representatives would bribe these leaders with modern marvels such as the telephone, repeating guns, television, ice, etc... Slowly these local leaders would switch loyalties from their own tribes to the Westerners. Eventually, these local leaders, and their henchman, would sell out their fellow Arabs, order locals of the land needed by the oil corporations, and back up their orders with their newly acquired guns.

Overall, the egalitarian, communal society that existed was transformed into a dictatorship propped up by Western oil interests. A ruling class was created that was distinct from and unrepresentative of the people at large. Oil, and the control of its acquisition, transportation, and distribution, replaced people and communal consensus as the source of power. And this is how many of the modern Arab nations came into being. All in all this is a great book, probably the best fiction book to read to understand the thinking of Al Qaeda and roots of Arab anger at America. The cloest way to describe it is the Arab world's version of America's Grapes of Wrath; the destruction of a communal and family-based way of life by modern corporations.