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Download High Tide in Tucson: Essays from Now or Never eBook

by Barbara Kingsolver

Download High Tide in Tucson: Essays from Now or Never eBook
ISBN:
0060927569
Author:
Barbara Kingsolver
Category:
Essays & Correspondence
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harper Perennial; 1st HarperPerennial Ed edition (November 25, 2003)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1988 kb
FB2 book:
1752 kb
DJVU:
1701 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
769


Essays from now or never.

Essays from now or never. Illustrations by Paul Mirocha. Hurray for Moms, who give us the courage to take up our shelf space on the planet, but I know I can't count on the rest of humanity for the same passion to read every line that ever leaked from my pen.

High Tide in Tucson: Essa. has been added to your Cart. For many years now, I've been telling my friends, I want to be Barbara Kingsolver when I grow up - because one can speak in shorthand like that with friends. But for those of you who feel they haven't as yet achieved that distinction, let's just say, I think of Ms. Kingsolver as one of my heroines, affording her the same expressions of reverence and awe I reserve for folks like Mary Robinson, Elizabeth Warren, Elizabeth May, and Tracy Chapman - these women are not merely changing the world, but encouraging us.

Home Barbara Kingsolver High Tide in Tucson. I would never dream of marrying a woman with tattoos," a Cotonou University student told me, and another young man insisted, when he learned I was going north, that the food in the markets up there is unclean. High tide in tucson, . 7. Members of different tribes, even when they move into the cities, tend to segregate themselves.

New York : HarperCollins Publishers. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. t on September 26, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

High Tide in Tucson: Essays from Now or Never. by Barbara Kingsolver

High Tide in Tucson: Essays from Now or Never. by Barbara Kingsolver. There is no one quite like Barbara Kingsolver in contemporary literature," raves the Washington Post Book World, and it is right. She has been nominated three times for the ABBY award, and her critically acclaimed writings consistently enjoy spectacular commercial success as they entertain and touch her legions of loyal fans. In High Tide in Tucson, she returnsto her familiar themes of family, community, the common good and the natural world.

Barbara Kingsolver, already famous for Beantrees, Pigs in Heaven, et. lets loose with this collection of 25 essays . I have only a few pages to go with the book of essays "High Tide in Tucson". It is written by Barbara Kingsolver who wrote a book on Oprah's list called the "Poisonwood Bible". lets loose with this collection of 25 essays on issues as diverse as hermit crabs, political activism, and vegetarianism. That is still on my list to read. The essays are opinion of the author and she is of a very liberal political bent.

High Tide in Tucson book.

In High Tide in Tucson, she returnsto her familiar themes of family, community, the common good and the natural world. The title essay considers Buster, a hermit crab that accidentally stows away on Kingsolver's return trip from the Bahamas to her desert home, and turns out to have manic-depressive tendencies. Buster is running around for all he's worth - one can only presume it's high tide in Tucson. Kingsolver brings a moral vision and refreshing sense of humor to subjects ranging from modern motherhood to the history of private property to the suspended citizenship of human.

way of expressing and gathering ideas, free writing, was introduced allowing self made thesis and introducing.

way of expressing and gathering ideas, free writing, was introduced allowing self made thesis and introducing personal feedback into the writing process. Writing in high school was not very enjoyable. give students a good chance to learn that writing can be an enjoyable experience. Previous schooling has left me

"There is no one quite like Barbara Kingsolver in contemporary literature," raves the Washington Post Book World, and it is right. She has been nominated three times for the ABBY award, and her critically acclaimed writings consistently enjoy spectacular commercial success as they entertain and touch her legions of loyal fans.

In High Tide in Tucson, she returnsto her familiar themes of family, community, the common good and the natural world. The title essay considers Buster, a hermit crab that accidentally stows away on Kingsolver's return trip from the Bahamas to her desert home, and turns out to have manic-depressive tendencies. Buster is running around for all he's worth -- one can only presume it's high tide in Tucson. Kingsolver brings a moral vision and refreshing sense of humor to subjects ranging from modern motherhood to the history of private property to the suspended citizenship of human beings in the Animal Kingdom.

Beautifully packaged, with original illustrations by well-known illustrator Paul Mirocha, these wise lessons on the urgent business of being alive make it a perfect gift for Kingsolver's many fans.

  • Nightscar
Whether or not one likes a book is so incredibly subjective, it seems absurd to rate a writer's effort in the same way one would rate a toaster or a car wax. There have been times in my life when I've been moved to tears or laughter by a tome I would have dismissed as uninteresting or unimportant, under other circumstances. And then, there have been other times when I've been so distracted, or for some reason felt so odds with an author's creative effort, it wasn't until later, when I read it again, I truly appreciated all I'd missed the first time around. So, feel free to treat the five stars above as a temporal and situational outburst having little to do with anything but my own general, heady sense of gratitude for Ms. Kingsolver's decision long ago to become a writer, and my more immediate appreciation for her willingness to pull together these particular stories and essays. For many years now, I've been telling my friends, I want to be Barbara Kingsolver when I grow up - because one can speak in shorthand like that with friends. But for those of you who feel they haven't as yet achieved that distinction, let's just say, I think of Ms. Kingsolver as one of my heroines, affording her the same expressions of reverence and awe I reserve for folks like Mary Robinson, Elizabeth Warren, Elizabeth May, and Tracy Chapman - these women are not merely changing the world, but encouraging us to walk beside them and find our own ways to stand our ground in favor of justice, kindness, compassion, awareness, and critical thinking. "High Tide in Tuscon," is a portrait of the world in which I am determined to live, written by the author I want to be - seriously, if I may, speaking friend to friend, does it get any better than that?
  • Mori
I've got to admit, there were parts where I wouldn't have given this book more than two stars, and parts where I swore it deserved more than five stars. So I'm going to split the difference and give it four stars.

I think where Barbara Kingsolver really shines is when she gets to talking about politically loaded views. She is much more liberal than me, and no one can make me change my mind like she can. Stone Soup in particular was an essay that really stuck with me, where she remarked on divorce and broken families, and really made me see the merits of having an untraditional family. Civil Disobedience at Breakfast was a fascinating take on parenting; it held my rapture even though I'm not a mother ... not even close.

In the Belly of the Beast and Jabberwocky were urgent, emotionally resonating essays on the importance of reducing war and violence, and never forgetting that the people on the other end of the gun are PEOPLE, and not merely faceless, soulless enemies to be destroyed.

I loved reading her accounts on what it's like to be a full time writer, because that's been a dream of mine ever since I discovered reading as a knee-high tyke. Postcards from the Imaginary Mom and Careful What You Let in the Door are two good examples of this.

Where she falls short, I feel, are her essays on traveling. The middle of the book, with The Memory Place, The Vibrations of Djoogbe, and Infernal Paradise, lags. I feel like her travel essays are much more focused on what she observes rather than what she's thinking, and her observations don't have the same enthralling quality that her thoughts and opinions do.

The beginning of her book felt a little haphazard as well. I felt like within the course of an essay, she would sometimes let her mind wander and just follow it wherever it chose to go, and I felt like her prose could have used some tightening. I did not feel this way with her later essays, so perhaps this was a problem that resolved itself as she matured in her writing abilities.

In summation: Not every essay packed a punch. But the ones that did got you right in the gut.
  • Delaath
My favorite Kingsolver book. Her politics are evident in certain essays, so you will probably want to steer clear if liberal leanings really bother you. But Kingsolver also writes in a very grounded and practical way, not too preachy, and I think that is why I am not bothered by the political aspects. I generally steer clear of preachy political books whether I agree with the message or not. But I think this book has a different quality. In my opinion, it touches on certain truths about people and about life. It is a great read.
  • Spilberg
A fan of the author's Poisonwood Bible, I have been progressively disappointed with her more recent novels. And with this reading, I no longer think I can read her work. As another reviewer commented....my mistake. However, the author claims she writes to share the truth. This is just lazy. A shortcut to get all of her complaints down in written form. A negative voice that it will take awhile to get out of my head. She could pick any one of these topics and put in a creative work of fiction so that the reader could enter a world that might encourage a shared viewpoint. A warning label should be included with this work. Reading it was like sitting next to a grouchy, indulgent, self-serving old relative for two weeks of Thanksgiving dinners.
  • Bremar
Beautiful, interesting, informative, touching essays. Kingsolver is a keeper
  • Thofyn
Once again Barbara Kingsolver makes a mark with me. I am never disappointed. This is no exception. I recommend it to folks who don't have much time to read. I want them to experience Kingsolver one story at a time.
  • Tolrajas
I didn't know what to expect from High Tide, I picked up the book because I am a fan of Barbara Kingsolver's fiction.
I found, for the first time, the enjoyment found in reading non-fiction philosophical discussion. The views expressed in these essays made me begin to think, and woke me up from our spoon-fed media world to start thinking for myself. It encouraged me to start researching rather than taking news for granted, and I also now listen to BBC news for a more rounded view. It's been an eye opener and conscious awakening for me.
Another great Barbara Kingsolver read. This is a collection of short stories from her earlier years, but as good as anything recent.