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Download Playing in Time: Essays, Profiles, and Other True Stories eBook

by Carlo Rotella

Download Playing in Time: Essays, Profiles, and Other True Stories eBook
ISBN:
0226729095
Author:
Carlo Rotella
Category:
Essays & Correspondence
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press; First Edition edition (September 10, 2012)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1914 kb
FB2 book:
1832 kb
DJVU:
1288 kb
Other formats
rtf lit lrf txt
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
426


Carlo Rotella shows us how much we've been missing in the years since he published his last book.

Carlo Rotella shows us how much we've been missing in the years since he published his last book. In this collection of articles and essays about fencers, boxers, nightmares, Providence and Jack Vance-to name a few-he displays a remarkable talent for piercing observations and deftly-turned phrases. Yet within the disciplined fireworks of his style, true mastery is displayed by a narrator whose insight into human shortcomings is matched by his empathy for them

Электронная книга "Playing in Time: Essays, Profiles, and Other True Stories", Carlo Rotella.

Электронная книга "Playing in Time: Essays, Profiles, and Other True Stories", Carlo Rotella. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Playing in Time: Essays, Profiles, and Other True Stories" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Playing in Time: Essays, Profiles, and Other True Stories (University of Chicago Press, 2012). Cut Time: An Education at the Fights (Houghton Mifflin, 2003). Good With Their Hands: Boxers, Bluesmen, and Other Characters from the Rust Belt (University of California Press, 2002). October Cities: The Redevelopment of Urban Literature (University of California Press, 1998). The Unexpected Power of Your Old Neighborhood," The New Yorker (May 22, 2019).

Playing in Time book. Rotella’s essays are always smart, frequently funny, and consistently surprising. This collection will be welcomed by his many fans and will bring his inimitable style and approach to an even wider audience.

Essays, Profiles, and Other True Stories. It’s a tremendous pleasure to tour America with Carlo Rotella, whose essays take us from a style polka club in Chicago, to a ‘jazz fantasy camp’ in upstate New York, to the Las Vegas mall where Floyd Mayweather Jr. is getting a pedicure. Full of sharp dialogue, true to the ideals of craft and adventure, this essay collection reads like a great road novel. Elif Batuman, author of The Possessed

Playing in Time: Essays, Profiles, and Other True Stories. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

Playing in Time: Essays, Profiles, and Other True Stories. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

From jazz fantasy camp to running a movie studio; from a fight between an old guy and a fat guy to a fear of clowns-Carlo Rotella’s Playing in Time delivers good stories full of vivid characters, all told with the unique voice and humor that have garnered Rotella many devoted readers in the New York Times Magazine, Boston Globe, and Washington. Post Magazine, among others.

The two dozen essays in Playing in Time, some of which have never before been . Carlo Rotella is one of the most important non-fiction writers working in America today. Werner Sollors, Harvard University.

The two dozen essays in Playing in Time, some of which have never before been published, revolve around the themes and obsessions that have characterized Rotella’s writing from the start: boxing, music, writers, and cities. What holds them together is Rotella’s unique focus on people, craft, and what floats outside the mainstream. Rotella is best known for his writings on boxing, and his essays here do not disappoint. It’s a topic that he turns to for its colorful characters, compelling settings, and formidable life lessons both in and out of the ring.

The Boston College Libraries feature recent books, manuscripts, videos . Dr. Carlo Rotella, English Department Post Magazine, among others.

Dr. Carlo Rotella, English Department. From jazz fantasy camp to running a movie studio; from a fight between an old guy and a fat guy to a fear of clowns-Carlo Rotella’s Playing in Time delivers good stories full of vivid characters, all told with the unique voice and humor that have garnered Rotella many devoted readers in the New York Times Magazine, Boston Globe, and Washington.

From jazz fantasy camp to running a movie studio; from a fight between an old guy and a fat guy to a fear of clowns—Carlo Rotella’s Playing in Time delivers good stories full of vivid characters, all told with the unique voice and humor that have garnered Rotella many devoted readers in the New York Times Magazine, Boston Globe, and Washington Post Magazine, among others. The two dozen essays in Playing in Time, some of which have never before been published, revolve around the themes and obsessions that have characterized Rotella’s writing from the start: boxing, music, writers, and cities. What holds them together is Rotella’s unique focus on people, craft, and what floats outside the mainstream. “Playing in time” refers to how people make beauty and meaning while working within the constraints and limits forced on them by life, and in his writing Rotella transforms the craft and beauty he so admires in others into an art of his own.Rotella is best known for his writings on boxing, and his essays here do not disappoint. It’s a topic that he turns to for its colorful characters, compelling settings, and formidable life lessons both in and out of the ring. He gives us tales of an older boxer who keeps unretiring and a welterweight who is “about as rich and famous as a 147-pound fighter can get these days,” and a hilarious rumination on why Muhammad Ali’s phrase “I am the greatest” began appearing (in the mouth of Epeus) in translations of The Iliad around 1987. His essays on blues, crime and science fiction writers, and urban spaces are equally and deftly engaging, combining an artist’s eye for detail with a scholar’s sense of research, whether taking us to visit detective writer George Pelecanos or to dance with the proprietress of the Baby Doll Polka Club next to Midway Airport in Chicago.Rotella’s essays are always smart, frequently funny, and consistently surprising. This collection will be welcomed by his many fans and will bring his inimitable style and approach to an even wider audience.
  • Brakora
Since reading Cut Time years ago (the best fight reporting ever) I love Carlo Rotella's clear writing and ability to get to the core of what's really going on in what he observes. Very good journalism that borders on literature.
  • Yojin
This book is wonderful. It will remind you that good writers help us see better. Rotella brings fresh insight, humor, honesty, range, and wonder to everything he settles his gaze on, including boxing, the blues, writing, fencing, the feel of a city, and more. If you enjoy the pleasure of a well-crafted sentence and an open mind you will be delighted.
  • SoSok
Playing in Time was a good read. It's title goes far beyond the title of the last essay in the book; the essays and profiles within the book took me through the decades and from city to city. It pleasantly brought to life places I had never been to like Chicago and Washington. The people he focuses on are just ordinary enough to be able to relate to yet just unique enough to make for a very interesting essay, almost always helping me put the book down satisfied by a deep one or two liner at the end of each essay.
While it's not a book that you'd want to just read from start to finish, the writing style in "Playing in Time" is just complex enough to make you think a bit but smooth enough to make you want to keep turning the page. Rotella's columnist side shows as he reports on the lives of all of his characters, especially on himself. His strict non fiction style helped me to connect with him: because the stories were so real I was sure that the life lessons I was getting out of his essay were lessons that he had learned by experience. Whereas nonfiction was normally a genre that I was never too interested in reading, he makes non-fiction seem easy and interesting, where the real people around us have such great potential to explore and learn from, why would we ever try to learn from fake ones? Overall, as my first real adventure in non-fiction, it was a very worthwhile read.
  • Steelraven
My librarian recommended this book to me when I checked out a copy of "The Stories of John Cheever". After requesting and reading the St. Paul Library's copy of Rotella's "Playing in Time", I purchased my own copy and read it through again. The Jack Vance and George Pelecanos stories alone are worth the price of the book. I am not sure why my librarian thought I would enjoy Rotella based on my reading of Cheever, but I am glad she made the recommendation.