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Download Letters from the Palazzo Barbaro eBook

by Rosella Mamolli Zorzi,Henry James

Download Letters from the Palazzo Barbaro eBook
ISBN:
1901285073
Author:
Rosella Mamolli Zorzi,Henry James
Category:
Essays & Correspondence
Language:
English
Publisher:
Pushkin Press (January 1, 1998)
Pages:
224 pages
EPUB book:
1118 kb
FB2 book:
1850 kb
DJVU:
1834 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
728


I would like to dedicate the English, revised version of this book to the memory of Leon Edel, without whose encouragement I would never have proceeded along the path of Jamesian studies. An entire book might be written about the relations between Venice and its Americans, but Rosella Mamoli Zorzi has chosen to offer us a modest gathering-in of certain letters written by members of the trans-Atlantic society who were joined by certain British figures in the high-ceilinged drawing room of the Barbaro’s piano nobile.

The novelist Henry James (1843-1916) is one of the most prominent figures of American and British Literature.

This volume includes historical photographs and a foreword by Leon Edel, Henry James's biographer. The novelist Henry James (1843-1916) is one of the most prominent figures of American and British Literature.

Palazzo Barbaro was in James' day (and still . The contrast between James' letters and the Curtis letters is revealing

Palazzo Barbaro was in James' day (and still was at the time of the publication of this book in 1997) the home of the expatriate American family, the Curtises, who were great patrons of the arts. They were painted by Sargent, and in their home Browning read his poems, and James finished writing The Aspern Papers. The contrast between James' letters and the Curtis letters is revealing. In addition to a foreword by Leon Edel (James' biographer), there is an introduction by Rosella Mamoli Zorzi, who has written extensively about the expatriate colony in Venice.

The novelist Henry James arrived in Venice as a tourist, and instantly fell in love with the city – particularly with the splendid Palazzo Barbaro, home of the .

The novelist Henry James arrived in Venice as a tourist, and instantly fell in love with the city – particularly with the splendid Palazzo Barbaro, home of the expatriate American Curtis family. This selection of letters covers the period 1869-1907 and provides a unique record of the life and work of this great writer. Includes historical photographs and a foreword by Leon Edel, Henry James’s biographer.

Until 1797 the Palazzo Barbaro had witnessed centuries of splendour. In the fifteenth century it had been the meeting point for some of the most illustrious representatives of Renaissance humanism.

Palazzo Barbaro was in James' day (and still was at the time of the publication of this Having just finished . The contrast between James' letters and the Curtis letters is revealing

Palazzo Barbaro was in James' day (and still was at the time of the publication of this Having just finished Colm Tóibín's novel about James, The Master, I determined to read some of James' work that I hadn't read before. So I was browsing at Powell's, and came across this little volume. The latter are pretty much the "today we did this" and "so-and-so's been to visit" type, while James' are full of gorgeous images and his usual insightful observations.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Letters From the Palazzo Barbaro by James . This collection of letters, written during his stays in Venice, provides a unique insight into Henry James's life and work.

This collection of letters, written during his stays in Venice, provides a unique insight into Henry James's life and work.

1. Like Tita, the servants of the Curtises. 2. The four Montalba sisters, with their parents and a brother, lived at Palazzo Trevisan, on the Zattere, in Venice. They all received some award for their artistic merits

1. They all received some award for their artistic merits. Henrietta (1856–1893) as a sculptor, Clara (1842–1929) as a painter: the latter is the author of the pretty drawings that illustrated Mrs. Bronson’s essay, Browning in Asolo.

HENRY JAMES first came to Venice as a tourist and instantly fell in love with the city – particularly with the splendid Palazzo Barbaro, home of the expatriate American Curtis family. This selection of letters covers the period 1869–1907 and provides a unique record of the life and work of this great writer. Includes historical photographs and a foreword by Leon Edel, Henry James's biographer. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

This collection has been selected and edited by R. Mamoli Zorzi, a professor of Anglo-American Literature at the University of Venice, Ca' Foscari. It contains previously unpublished manuscript letters. In addition to an introduction by the editor, it has a foreword by the late Leon Edel, the great James biographer and editor.
  • Valawye
Th Letters gave an insight into manners and manners of speaking in another era. I really enjoyed the language.

I got a sense that Henry was very comfortable with women and engaged them in chatty gossip almost like "girlfriend". He seemed to know how to work the angles to get a nice room as he traveled the world.
  • OTANO
Having just finished Colm Tóibín's novel about James, The Master, I determined to read some of James' work that I hadn't read before. So I was browsing at one of my favorite used bookstores, and came across this little volume. I admit to being attracted first by its physical beauty -- a small paperback with a heavy textured blue outer jacket, very simple typography, and a picture of Palazzo Ducale I by Roger de Montebello on a smooth paper.

Palazzo Barbaro was in James' day (and still was at the time of the publication of this book in 1997) the home of the expatriate American family, the Curtises, who were great patrons of the arts. They were painted by Sargent, and in their home Browning read his poems, and James finished writing The Aspern Papers.

These letters are primarily written by James but there are also some written by members of the Curtis family. James writes to the Curtis', to Isabella Steward Gardner, to Constance Woolson (and we see, in a later letter, the impact of her suicide on James and his view of Venice). The word "from" in the title is a bit misleading, as many are written from other parts of Italy, and a few from England and Switzerland. But to the extent that the Palazzo was a place in the heart, then the title is accurate.

The contrast between James' letters and the Curtis letters is revealing. The latter are pretty much the "today we did this" and "so-and-so's been to visit" type, while James' are full of gorgeous images and his usual insightful observations.

In addition to a foreword by Leon Edel (James' biographer), there is an introduction by Rosella Mamoli Zorzi, who has written extensively about the expatriate colony in Venice. There are end notes after each letter, but I do wish there had been more, as there are intriguing references in the letters to unexplained events (what did happen with Pen Browning's marriage? and what was Mrs. Ralph Curtis' "situation"?).

This lovely little volume provides a delightful glimpse into James' Italian world.
  • Rrd
His novels are too dense for me but his travel writing is delightful.
The books make good movies. The Golden Bowl on PBS was excellent