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Download The Mevrouw Who Saved Manhattan: A Novel of New Amsterdam eBook

by Bill Greer

Download The Mevrouw Who Saved Manhattan: A Novel of New Amsterdam eBook
ISBN:
1439221782
Author:
Bill Greer
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
BookSurge Publishing (January 24, 2009)
Pages:
306 pages
EPUB book:
1492 kb
FB2 book:
1349 kb
DJVU:
1513 kb
Other formats
lit mbr azw rtf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
779


When Mevrouw Jackie Lambert opens her New Amsterdam tavern in 1626, she jumps aboard a madcap ride . So it was with special interest I read The Mervtouw Who Saved Manhattan, an historical Novel by Bill Greer

When Mevrouw Jackie Lambert opens her New Amsterdam tavern in 1626, she jumps aboard a madcap ride through New York history. So it was with special interest I read The Mervtouw Who Saved Manhattan, an historical Novel by Bill Greer. You author obviously has immersed himself in a deep understanding of the culture, customs, and even vocabulary of the early Dutch settlers.

Bill Greer has deftly blended fact and fiction in his humorous tale The Mevrouw Who Saved Manhattan.

This book is very good, some people have actually downloaded and read the Free download The Mevrouw Who Saved Manhattan A. .When Mevrouw Jackie Lambert opens her New Amsterdam tavern in 1626, she jumps aboard a madcap ride through New York history

This book is very good, some people have actually downloaded and read the Free download The Mevrouw Who Saved Manhattan A Novel of New Amsterdam right here. When Mevrouw Jackie Lambert opens her New Amsterdam tavern in 1626, she jumps aboard a madcap ride through New York history. With a razor-sharp tongue and the tastiest beer on either side of the Atlantic, Jackie spurs the tiny Manhattan settlement toward a head-on collision with the tyrannical Dutchmen who rule it.

Wander through New York's Past & Present with Author Bill Greer. A Novel of New Amsterdam. A "romp through the history of New Netherland that would surely have Petrus Stuyvesant complaining about the riot transpiring between its pages. Thirty years ago I moved into an 1887 Brooklyn brownstone and began exploring New York. I've dug up quite a few treasures, from the first Dutchmen in 1609 to the streets today. Readers are guaranteed a genuine adventure that will evoke the full range of human emotions. Once begun, they can expect to experience that rare difficulty in putting down a book before they have finished.

When Mevrouw Jackie Lambert opens her New Amsterdam tavern in 1626, she jumps aboard a madcap ride through .

When Mevrouw Jackie Lambert opens her New Amsterdam tavern in 1626, she jumps aboard a madcap ride through New York history. Poison, blackmail, murder, all are fair game as she fends off threats to the family she yearned for growing up as an orphan. Bill Greer is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

His novel of New Amsterdam, The Mevrouw Who Saved Manhattan, paints a real and humorous portrait of Dutch life on the Hudson through the eyes of a sharp- tongued bride who comes among the first settlers.

Amsterdam is a 1998 novel by British writer Ian McEwan, for which he was awarded the 1998 Booker Prize. At the funeral of photographer and writer Molly Lane, three of Molly's former lovers converge.

But the deeper history of Amsterdam. Customers who bought this item also bought. Russell Shorto is the author of five books and is a contributing writer at the The New York Times Magazine. Page 1 of 1 Start overPage 1 of 1. This shopping feature will continue to load items. The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America. From 2008 to 2013, he was the director of the John Adams Institute in Amsterdam.

The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan

The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan. and the Forgotten Colony.

New Amsterdam (Dutch: Nieuw-Amsterdam) was a 17th-century Dutch . Penelope: A Novel of New Amsterdam, Greer, SC: Twisted Cedar Press, 2012.

New Amsterdam (Dutch: Nieuw-Amsterdam) was a 17th-century Dutch settlement established at the southern tip of Manhattan Island, which served as the seat of the colonial government in New Netherland territory  .

When Mevrouw Jackie Lambert opens her New Amsterdam tavern in 1626, she jumps aboard a madcap ride through New York history. With a razor-sharp tongue and the tastiest beer on either side of the Atlantic, Jackie spurs the tiny Manhattan settlement toward a head-on collision with the tyrannical Dutchmen who rule it. Poison, blackmail, murder, all are fair game as she fends off threats to the family she yearned for growing up as an orphan. And when pegleg Peter Stuyvesant would rather destroy the town than surrender his honor, Jackie must take history into her own hands or lose everything she has spent a lifetime building. “A very authentic ring … like etchings of Everybodies by van Eyck.” – Charles Wendell, Ph.D., President of the New Netherland Institute.
  • Humin
Since I was familiar with the history of New York City and the Dutch beginnings and continuing influence, I was anxious to read a novel about that time period. I wasn't disappointed in the way the events and the characters were portrayed and perhaps it even clarified some facts. My biggest problem was getting bogged down with all the Dutch names, and particularly, the use of Dutch words that weren't familiar.
As far as the characters were concerned, I knew that Joris and Catalina were real people so it fascinating to see how they were woven into the plot. As an aside, they are said to now have over one million descendants.
Peter Stuyvesant, with so many things named for him, in retrospect, might not really deserve all that recognition.
Bill Greer obviously knew his New Amsterdam/York history and told it in an enjoyable way.
  • Mr.Death
Wander through New York's Past and Present with William "Bill" Greer, the author of "The Mevrouw Who Saved Manhattan."

Like a modern version of William Irving's "Knickerbocker Tales" of New York featuring the Headless Horseman, "The Mevrouw ..." pokes a little fun at the history of the nation's largest city.

Bill's Brownstone, as he titles his website, is clean and easy to navigate with just enough graphic to relieve the type. You gotta go there to enjoy it!

I love Bill Greer's webpage -- and not just because I am enjoying his book so much, but also because he has a deep love for the history of our country and the settlement of the Dutch (which I share). He also has a love for travel and includes a page of his adventures around the world.

His book is a delightful romp across the history of the "Reformed Dutch" devout church goers, who left their mark forever on the metropolis.

Just catch this note:
"This story of New Amsterdam is told by a teen-age bride - turned Pearl Street tavernkeeper, whose razor-sharp tongue and premium beer spur the tiny Manhattan settlement toward a head-on collision with the tyrannical Dutchmen who rule it."

It is amazing to me that a man is able to tell this story so authentically from a woman's viewpoint - including his description of childbirth!

Bill Greer serves as Treasurer of the New Netherland Institute, a membership organization focusing on research and education in Dutch-American history.

His tales of Notorious New Yorkers will capture your interest and his way with words keeps you turning the pages, he includes just enough documentation to make the stories possible and even probable.
  • Grokinos
My girlfriend who shares ancestors loved this book, but I did not, even though my ancestors were mentioned in it. I found the writing awkward to read and basically knew the history from other books.
  • Zahisan
This novel was surprisingly bawdy. Two of the characters are my 10th great grandparents so seeing them there was a big kick. From what little I know of their lives, I think some of the action in the book drew from their experiences. It was fun regardless, so much that I've been sending it to relatives for birthday gifts. These ancestors are known as "the Adam and Even of New Amsterdam"; they had 11 children and most of those children had 10-12 kids, and on and on.
  • Walan
It was great fun to read this book after just finishing "Island at the Center of the World". The author managed to make the characters (some of them my ancestors) and their daily lives seem very real and understandable. Obviously a great deal of loving research went into it, and it shows.
  • OTANO
I enjoyed the fun and flirty writing style in the beginning, but the further I read, the more it seemed like a light trash novel. I did not finish this book...there are so many much better books in my library.
  • Malhala
This book, even though it's fiction, paints a very acurate picture of how things went in those days. I'm -kinda- interested in the Dutch history of New York, so I have read countless of other books about it; so what I'm trying to say is that this book is a definite keeper and a must-have addition to any New Amsterdam-library.
Solidly researched story of problems faces by earliest Dutch settlers.
The subject matter is interesting but the characters aren't. A bit plodding.