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by Allen Ballard

Download Where I'm Bound eBook
ISBN:
0595398561
Author:
Allen Ballard
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Backinprint.com (July 21, 2006)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1749 kb
FB2 book:
1246 kb
DJVU:
1644 kb
Other formats
docx mbr lit doc
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
341


A Washington Post Notable Book. Also a winner of the First Novelist Award from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association

A Washington Post Notable Book. Also a winner of the First Novelist Award from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. The important story of black soldiers in the Union Army has finally found a writer of historical fiction equal to the occasion.

Where I'm Bound book. When Duckett escapes his life of bondage to become a cavalry scout, he grows to be more than a free man - he becomes a hero.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A former slave turned cavalry scout becomes a hero for an African-American cavalry regiment in the Civil War.

A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Kenyon College in Ohio, Allen Ballard received his P. from Harvard University.

One More Day's Journey. Publication Date : 2/10/2012. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Kenyon College in Ohio, Allen Ballard received his P. The author of two other books, he is presently Professor of Africana Studies and History at SUNY, Albany.

yet-to return to the plantation from which he escaped to find his wife and daughter. A Washington Post Notable Book.

A former slave turned cavalry scout becomes a hero for an African-American cavalry regiment in the Civil War. But, as the war draws to an end, the soldier, Joe Duckett, embarks on his most dangerous mission yet-to return to the plantation from which he escaped to find his wife and daughter. Also a winner of the First Novelist Award from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association

Where I'm bound : a novel. by. Ballard, Allen B. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Where I'm bound : a novel. Slavery, African American soldiers. New York : Simon & Schuster. Internet Archive Books. org on October 13, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Information about the book, Where I’m Bound: A Novel: the Fiction, Hardcover, by Allen Ballard (Simon & Schuster, Oct 05, 2000) . Book Description: "Where I’m Bound," a stunning and engaging Civil War novel, is the first work of fiction to focus solely on the soldiers of an African-American regiment. Throughout the war, more than 180,000 African-American men fought for the Union Army. Many were escaped slaves, others were freed men; yet all voluntarily enlisted for one cause: freedom. For the first time in fiction, their experiences are successfully portrayed in a manner befitting the grandeur and scope of their contributions.

It is a book that entertains, ennobles, and inspires. John Herritage, retired Staff Inspector of the New York State Police, said, ‘Carried By Six’ is a very well-told story that celebrates the courage of those valiant folks in the inner city who, contrary to the ‘no snitchin’ code, are determined to fight for neighborhoods where their children can grow up safe and secure from gunfire and random violence. Ballard keeps it real and writes with power and authority

027973) Ballard, Allen B. Where I'm Bound. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000.

027973) Ballard, Allen B. Fine in Fine DJ. Remainder mark.

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A former slave turned cavalry scout becomes a hero for an African-American cavalry regiment in the Civil War. But, as the war draws to an end, the soldier, Joe Duckett, embarks on his most dangerous mission yet-to return to the plantation from which he escaped to find his wife and daughter.A Washington Post Notable Book. Also a winner of the First Novelist Award from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association."The important story of black soldiers in the Union Army has finally found a writer of historical fiction equal to the occasion." James A McPherson, Professor of History, Princeton University
  • Kiutondyl
This was the first book ever written telling the story of former slaves who fought for the Union during the civil war. The fact that Professor Ballard chose the 3rd U.S. Colored Cavalry to tell the story is a bonus. All the (or most ) of the action depicted in the book is based on actual encounters, obviously some facts were changed to fit the story, but the out come of the events as it relates to the 3rd USCC are factual.

Professor Ballard does a great job of story telling and the action starts right from the beginning. It's none stop suspense with some of the binds Joe gets himself in and if you read the true story of the 3rd USCC you will find that the Joe Duckett aka Alfred Wood, was ONE BADD DUDE. I am so happy his story was told.
  • Modigas
Allen Ballard knows how to tell a good story. His characters come alive as we accompany them through the tragic events in 1864-1865 western Mississippi. Both white and black characters come across as real people, and I was sorry to leave them when the book was all-too-soon finished.
  • Ishnllador
I needed the book for an Africana Studies class at school. It was surprisingly interesting and insightful to the way African American slaves thoughts during the Civil War
  • DireRaven
This is the fast-moving story of the intertwined exploits of master and slaves in Mississippi during the Civil War, especially of one Joe Duckett, an enslaved person who escapes to the Union side and quickly rises into leadership of a black regiment. We also follow his wife and children in their own desperate struggles for freedom and safety, and his former master (a rebel commander) and family. It's a lively, suspenseful tale that strikes me as realistic and balanced in its portrayals. Although the book's sympathies are obviously with the escaped slaves, there are also heroic whites in this book, and scoundrel blacks, and nobody's a saint. It's clear that the war led to brutality on both sides. It's also sobering reading at a time when it seems we're still fighting some of the same battles politically. If the folks who are producing Mercy Street want to take on a more ambitious war story next time, they should really take a look at this book.
  • Yozshubei
I have a previous edition of this book, and I enjoyed it a great deal. The Civil War was a bloody affair, and the fighting wasn't confined to large battles on dramatic occasions. A lot of the fighting occurred in small fights and skirmishes, and this is the setting and basis for this book recounting the exploits of a fictional character who's a sergeant in a black cavalry regiment stationed in Northern Mississippi during the latter part of the war. The author makes almost no attempt to explain the historical situation to you, instead just sticking with the pro- and anti-slavery arguments, and he spends much of the book following various people. Some are Union and some are Confederate, both genders, and he makes a serious effort to not just portray the Confederates as evil Rebel slave owners. The effort is largely successful, and so is the book. The main character is rather lucky in that he rides through all these battles without ever getting seriously wounded, but real-life soldiers have done this also, and other than that quibble, the book is essentially flawless. Highly recommended.
  • Umor
"Where I'm Bound", is a work of historically-based fiction by Mr. Allen B. Ballard documenting the 180,000 African American Men who fought for the Union Army during this Nation's Civil War. Like the "Buffalo Soldiers" who served this Country in its Western Frontier, the 1,000 commissioned officers in World War I, the 370,000 "Doughboys" of World War I, or the Tuskegee Airman of World War II fighter pilot fame, these men and women fought and died for ideas and beliefs for which they have never been fully rewarded.
Rewarded may be the wrong word, perhaps recognition was all they sought. The tragedy of what they sought was something that their white counterparts took for granted, or in some cases took away from them. These African-American Soldiers were in some instances freedmen, in other, slaves who had escaped and then joined the Union Army to march directly back and fight those who enslaved them. They fought to reunite their families, they fought for what they were told would be waiting for them if the Union won, they fought for what the white men they fought and died with had enjoyed under the words, "we hold these truths to be self evident". The truths were self evident if you were white, male, and owned property. If you did not meet these criteria the words were as meaningless then as they are today.
Mr. Ballard recreates the horror of hand-to-hand fighting that was often a part of any given battle in this Country's Civil War. His story is fiction, however it is based upon real individuals that lived and fought, and the battles they fought and gave their lives in. His story contains all that was insidious in this war, however he also brings balance by depicting events that this reader did not expect to have actually happened. The events resolved themselves as one would hope they would, and that was why they were surprising to read, and an even greater surprise to read they are historically accurate.
Those who believed he was their savior refer to President Abraham Lincoln repeatedly in this book. They believed he was going to make them citizens a century after they had been excluded from the populace unless counted as property. What would they have felt, and how would they have fought if they knew this same President, "did not believe blacks and whites could live together"?
There were 180,000 black soldiers in the Union Army. How many African Americans do you see when the reenactments of some of the battles take place? How many paintings by those who chronicle that period of History celebrate the blood that was shed that was as red as any, but valued less because of its source?
If there were a vantage point from which those who have died can see what has resulted from their sacrifice, what changes would they see and what it is they died for, how would they feel? Their decision to fight and in their moment of death they may have indeed been free. But did their deaths bring the freedom they thought they were dying for? The answer is pathetic, as any cursory review of the century following the end of the Civil War will show.
This is an important book that I hope will cause the writing of many more. History is only as worthwhile as it is complete and accurate. African Americans, Native Americans, and other minorities have fought and died for the freedom we all enjoy. Because of books like this History becomes more valuable, for if you were to judge the contributions of African Americans by the number of monuments that have been raised to honor them, you would think they were barely present, much less a powerful positive element in the history of this Country.