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Download The Rebellion of Jane Clarke: A Novel eBook

by Sally Cabot Gunning

Download The Rebellion of Jane Clarke: A Novel eBook
ISBN:
0061782157
Author:
Sally Cabot Gunning
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
William Morrow Paperbacks; Reprint edition (April 26, 2011)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1688 kb
FB2 book:
1461 kb
DJVU:
1593 kb
Other formats
lrf docx txt lit
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
804


Author Sally Gunning's novel, "The Rebellion of Jane Clarke" is such a book. The plot does not contain radical surprises or terrifying horrors awaiting a beloved character just around the next corner.

Author Sally Gunning's novel, "The Rebellion of Jane Clarke" is such a book. Although placed on the eve of the American revolution, the taking of sides, colonial against royalist, and sudden bursts of anger from resident against British occupying troops are not all that unexpected.

From Sally Gunning, the critically acclaimed author of The Widow’s War and Bound, comes The Rebellion of Jane Clarke, the compelling story of a young woman caught between . carousel previous carousel next.

From Sally Gunning, the critically acclaimed author of The Widow’s War and Bound, comes The Rebellion of Jane Clarke, the compelling story of a young woman caught between tradition and independence, family and conscience, loyalty and love, on the eve of the Revolutionary War. Combining actual historical figures and events, like John Adams and the Boston Massacre, with enthralling fictional creations, author Gunning brings to vivid and unforgettable life the world of Colonial America on the brink of momentous upheaval and change.

A book by Sally Cabot Gunning is a high step above others in this genre. This is the third novel from Sally Gunning that revolves around members of the Clarke family and the people of Satucket, Massachusetts. May 18, 2010 Barb rated it liked it. Shelves: vine, read-in-2010, hf-1700s, pre-revolution, colonial-life, series-trilogy. The first is 'The Widow's War' the second is 'Bound'.

by Sally Cabot Gunning. From Sally Gunning, the critically acclaimed author of The Widow’s War and Bound, comes The Rebellion of Jane Clarke, the compelling story of a young woman caught between tradition and independence, family and conscience, loyalty and love, on the eve of the Revolutionary War. Books related to The Rebellion of Jane Clarke.

Электронная книга "Benjamin Franklin's Bastard: A Novel", Sally Cabot

Электронная книга "Benjamin Franklin's Bastard: A Novel", Sally Cabot. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Benjamin Franklin's Bastard: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

From Sally Gunning, the critically acclaimed author of The Widow’s War and Bound, comes The Rebellion of Jane Clarke, the compelling story of a young .

Sally Gunning is a gifted storyteller adept at layering time, place, and character and revealing conflicts of the heart.

Sally Gunning is a gifted storyteller adept at layering time, place, and character and revealing conflicts of the heart

Library Journal hailed Sally Gunning's previous novel, The Widow's War, as "historical fiction at its best.

Library Journal hailed Sally Gunning's previous novel, The Widow's War, as "historical fiction at its best. With Bound, this wonderfully talented writer returns to pre-Revolutionary New England and evokes a long-ago time filled with uncertainty, hardship, and promise. She is the author of the critically acclaimed Satucket Novels-The Widow’s War, Bound, and The Rebellion of Jane Clarke-and, writing as Sally Cabot, the equally acclaimed Benjamin Franklin’s Bastard. She lives in Brewster, Massachusetts, with her husband, Tom.

Sally Cabot Gunning, author. Historical fiction writer of Monticello, Benjamin Franklin's Bastard, The Widow's War, Bound, The Rebellion of Jane Clarke and more. Paulette Jiles, New York Times bestselling author of News of the World and Enemy Women.

JANE CLARKE STOOD in the sedge growth on the lip of the dune and looked out over the half-drained bay, the ribbons of sand rising up through the retreating water.

The seeming truth which cunning times put on. To entrap the wisest. JANE CLARKE STOOD in the sedge growth on the lip of the dune and looked out over the half-drained bay, the ribbons of sand rising up through the retreating water. Her cousin’s sloop, the Betsey, had slipped in ahead of the falling tide and lay canted sideways in the channel, keel nestled in the mud. Already, the oxcarts rumbled over the sand loaded with barrels and crates full of salt, rum, molasses, and other more worldly goods-most of them legal-come to Satucket from Boston, but Jane wasn’t there for goods.

“Sally Gunning is a gifted storyteller adept at layering time, place, and character and revealing conflicts of the heart.”—Anne LeClaire, author of Entering Normal

From Sally Gunning, the critically acclaimed author of The Widow’s War and Bound, comes The Rebellion of Jane Clarke, the compelling story of a young woman caught between tradition and independence, family and conscience, loyalty and love, on the eve of the Revolutionary War. Combining actual historical figures and events, like John Adams and the Boston Massacre, with enthralling fictional creations, author Gunning brings to vivid and unforgettable life the world of Colonial America on the brink of momentous upheaval and change.

  • Gathris
This is the third book in the series about Satucket, MA. The time period for the book is just prior to the revolutionary war. Jane is a young woman, living with her father, stepmother, and her younger siblings. She is being courted by young man put forward by her father. While she likes him, she wants more from her life, and shocks everyone when she turns down his proposal. Her father offers her the choice of reconsidering or going to Boston to be the caretaker for her elderly aunt. Jane decides to go to Boston and is happy about being closer to her brother, who is working as a clerk for Adams. Jane is an independent thinker and is puzzled by how both sides (loyalists like her father and revolutionaries like her brother) can distort the facts about the events surrounding them. While in Boston, she is courted by a bookseller, and also has the opportunity to spend some time with her grandmother and grandfather (whose story was told in the prior books). Jane must sort out her conflicting loyalties and feelings and decide what is right. This comes to the forefront after she witnesses the Boston Massacre. The book provides an interesting perspective on the time period.
  • Mojar
I felt like the author was pushing toward deadline with this novel & ended abruptly to ship it off to the publisher. My imagination is as colorful as any but I would have liked to see this wrap up a little more completely. I don't like it when books end abruptly with no real resolution - even tho I realize Jane was somewhat unsettled herself. That being said this is the third book I've read from this author. The start was slow but once it drew me in I found it an easy read. If the ending had been as well crafted as the rest, I'd have given it more stars.
  • NiceOne
Now and then we find a book that is so startling we cannot put it down, and never want it to end. Author Sally Gunning's novel, "The Rebellion of Jane Clarke" is such a book. The plot does not contain radical surprises or terrifying horrors awaiting a beloved character just around the next corner. Although placed on the eve of the American revolution, the taking of sides, colonial against royalist, and sudden bursts of anger from resident against British occupying troops are not all that unexpected. What really sets "The Rebellion of Jane Clarke" apart from others on the shelf is the elegance of the prose, its semblance to the period and its depth of characterization. In Gunning's carefully drawn images (and interior monologues), the reader is taken into the personality of Jane Clarke, a woman intellectual, reader and thinker who is by those traits branded an outsider. The final straw for Jane is drawn in the opening the chapters when she is evicted from her father's house for turning down the suitor he has chosen for her.

In the following passage, we see Jane examining the climate of her quandary about marrying her father's choice.

"Jane sat, struggling to order her thoughts, but the more she sat the more she began to resent the fact that she'd been forced to such a struggle at all. Her father could marry as many housekeepers as he chose; he could not marry away Jane as he chose. And what of Phinnie? Could he not share some of the blame for her predicament? All these words that would not slide off her pen the way she wished might have slid easily enough off her tongue if he'd but stayed to hear them instead of bolting off in the dead of night and disrupting the household. And she might not have needed to explain anything at all if he'd managed to answer a few simple questions with a little honesty and attention."

In Boston, we are given a taste of the coming revolution - a circumstance where Jane once again sees herself as an outsider, on the wrong side of the issues. There, author Gunning introduces us to Tories and Patriots alike, their points of view, and how the coming war is made inevitable by both sides. One of the truly inspiring aspects of The Rebellion of Jane Clarke is that Jane grows, as a character; she matures, becomes stronger, more in touch with what is right for her. The following passage shows her after two years in the city that most fomented the revolution.

"Jane burrowed under her coverlet, but soon tossed it back again. When she knew the thing to do she needed to do the thing. She returned to the keeping room and went though the old routine--blowing up the fire, lighting the candle off the coal, setting the inkwell on the hearth to thaw, laying out paper and pen--and as she did those things she thought how this was to be a part of her life now, no matter whether she lived in Satucket or town, that "home" was now a fractured thing, that someone she cared about should always be away from her, and only letters would allow an exchange between. Might she one day become her brother who could forsake a home for a cause? Or her grandmother, who it now appeared would at last forsake her home for a husband? Yes, Jane thought, she might do such a thing. But not for Henry Knox. She picked up her pen."

It is the growth and change or reasoned acceptance of herself that I find so elevating in "The Rebellion of Jane Clarke". All too often we find books with wooden characters, vignettes of pre-formed characters put in place to perform, then exit without having been influenced by the experience the plot provides.

Jane Clarke will return to your thoughts many times after you've grown with her as she matures. This is a book you can't afford to miss.
  • Doomredeemer
This is an engaging coming of age story set in the pre revolutionary war period, a time in our country's history marked by turmoil and conflict. Sally Gunning weaves some great period detail as she sheds light on what life was like for young women of marrying age during this time and provides great insight into the political unrest of the colonists. Jane, much like her budding country, is conflicted as she struggles to define herself. The heart of the book is the endearing voice of Jane as she weights the pro and cons of her decisions. As she grows her personality blossoms and although she is a soft presence, she is strong and nicely carries the book. The other strength of the book is the elegant writing style of this author, which perfectly complements the cast of characters and the setting. The overall pace of the book is slow but does hold your interest except mid way through where the plot stalls a bit. Stick with it though, it does pick up again. I recommend this book to those who like historical fiction or interesting stories with lasting memorable characters and beautiful prosaic writing.
  • Taur
The best of history telling is in the stories of the people who lived in it. This story of a fictional girl enmeshed in a very real historical event is a picture of how history happens while we are just living life. Jane Clarke is searching for love, a future for herself and an understanding of those closest to her. A typical young woman of then and now. She witnesses a crime of violence and wants to "do the right thing." I like Sally's writing and would love this story in any time frame but this is my favorite historical period so I enjoyed it even more.