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Download The Knight on the Bridge eBook

by William Watson

Download The Knight on the Bridge eBook
ISBN:
1860461409
Author:
William Watson
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harvill; New Ed edition (1996)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1876 kb
FB2 book:
1180 kb
DJVU:
1555 kb
Other formats
lrf lit mobi docx
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
218


Born in Edinburgh he attended Edinburgh Academy and then entered Edinburgh and Oxford universities but did not complete either course.

Born in Edinburgh he attended Edinburgh Academy and then entered Edinburgh and Oxford universities but did not complete either course. He commenced writing novels in 1969 with Better than One and then two historical novels entitled Beltran in Exile (1979) about the Crusaders and The Knight on the Bridge (1982) about the Cathars. These two latter books are generally regarded as his best works.

Knight On The Bridge Hardcover – 21 Mar 1996.

Everyday low prices on a huge range of new releases and classic fiction. Knight On The Bridge Hardcover – 21 Mar 1996. by. William Watson (Author).

Born in Edinburgh on 30 April 1931, he attended Edinburgh Academy and then entered Edinburgh and Oxford universities but did not complete either course. He commenced writing novels in 1969 with Better than One and then wrote two historical novels

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William Watson (writer). 30 April 1931 Edinburgh. Between 1970 and 1972 he wrote three plays; Footstool for God, set in Rosslyn Chapel,The Larch and Dodwell's Last Trump.

Find nearly any book by Watson,William (page 2). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Pencraft: A Plea for the Older Ways. ISBN 9780554709321 (978-0-554-70932-1) Softcover, BiblioBazaar, 2008. Find signed collectible books: 'Pencraft: A Plea for the Older Ways'.

The Poems of William Watson. One fee. Stacks of books.

WILLIAM H. WATSON DESTINED END: CHAPTER 1: Whiteley in. .Watson -Write in my diary (Unlocks a trophy if it’s your first time to pick this choice). Someone else -Mr. Howard -Read a book

WILLIAM H. WATSON DESTINED END: CHAPTER 1: Whiteley in Wonderland -I'm alright -The second witness -A -One (Answering above correctly will earn you: Detective Up!) -Give it to the child -I'd flee the country with him -Watson! CHAPTER 2: A Most Precarious Afternoon Tea -You ought to consider everyone's feelings -Right as rain! . Howard -Read a book. CHAPTER 8: The Missing Man. -I really shouldn’t -I’d best let them go -Classified documents on major crimes -Watson’s -In. CHAPTER 9: A Gathering in Shambles.

***EXCLNT COND*** lightly shelf rubbed, appears NEVER READ!!!
  • Beranyle
I came across this book by accident and didn't have any idea what to expect. By the end of the first absurdly beautiful chapter, I realised that I was reading one of the best books that I have ever put my hands on.
William Watson takes the reader into the world of a rundown castle in Mediaeval Provence. The world of a noble family gone mad. A knight whose terrible history of glory in battle gone wrong has left him in a state of permanent flight from reality. His beautiful wife, still strangely attached and in love, though possibly more with herself than with anyone else. The captain of the guards who would do almost anything for her. Their daughter, budding, immature and for the most part ignored. It will take the arrival of a young murderer, a rare guest at their table, to bring the sleeping insanity of the castle to its senses, though, by the end of the book, it is difficult to tell what is sane and what is not.
We are dragged through leaps of logic and labyrinthine psychological games of an absurdity only rivalled by their lucidity. We laugh, but sometimes only because of the ridiculous reality of a situation. We smell Provence and we hold our noses at the stench from inside a coat of armour. We luxuriate in his vocabulary and metaphor.
We want to read more, but we find, somehow, William Watson's other novels out of print!
  • Cordantrius
I can't imagine what Watson was trying to do with this story. There is a little of Chaucer, Cervantes, Undset, and a whole lot of silliness. I read to the end, but the moral wasn't any clearer than it seemed to be at the beginning. The best thing about the novel was the cover illustration - and even it seemed contrived, the light coming from at least two and maybe three sources, and all of them unlikely. Sorry, Watson, you went offbase with this one!!!