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Download You Lost Me There eBook

by Rosecrans Baldwin

Download You Lost Me There eBook
ISBN:
1594487634
Author:
Rosecrans Baldwin
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Riverhead Books; First Printing edition (August 12, 2010)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1203 kb
FB2 book:
1889 kb
DJVU:
1445 kb
Other formats
mbr mobi lit azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
240


You lost me there, Rosecrans Baldwin.

You lost me there, Rosecrans Baldwin. p. cm. eISBN : 978-1-101-18927-6.

You Lost Me There' is a good debut novel from Rosecran Baldwin. I was a bit let down by the ending, expecting maybe some big twist or revelation. It's an ending very much in synch with the pace and style of the overall work. The book's main theme is a sly one: Dr. Victor Aaron, P. and Alzheimer's expert, seems to have a different memory of his marriage to recently deceased wife than she had.

Is it a change of direction this time, or just another step in the way we’re headed? Or perhaps is this THE ONE change of direction, is what I’m really thinking or these cards? These aids . .

Is it a change of direction this time, or just another step in the way we’re headed? Or perhaps is this THE ONE change of direction, is what I’m really thinking or these cards? These aids that help me return to bed and say everything is all right, go back to sleep? I can’t be in the same bed with him. I feel betrayed. You’re a fluke, always have been, Victor said in so many words. I don’t know where to start. But sure, start with the story, start with the get-up-and-go. Change of direction number four, and it’s only just.

You Lost Me There book. By turns funny, charming, and tragic, Rosecrans Baldwin's debut. Victor spends his days alternating between long hours in the sterile lab and running through memories of his late wife, Sara.

Rosecrans Baldwin shows himself here to be a young writer bursting with talent and imagination who deftly handles this aching love story with sensitivity and unexpected maturity. You Lost Me There is a treasure of a book filled with beautiful, intelligent prose, a book that wears its smarts lightly and probes its emotions deeply.

You Lost Me There is, finally, a wise book, the kind that eludes many authors twice Baldwin's ag.Although that never keeps anyone from trying, as Rosecrans Baldwin’s amiable first novel demonstrates.Profound, affecting, and true. The Washington Post: "Baldwin’s prose is wise and nimble, clever without being self-conscious, true to the myriad voices of his characters. The Chicago Tribune: Memory is a trickster, a scamp, a rogue.

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Rosecrans Baldwin is an American novelist and essayist. Born in Chicago, Illinois and raised in Darien, Connecticut, Baldwin now lives in the Los Angeles, California area with his wife. Baldwin is the author of a memoir Paris, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, May 2012) based on the year and half he and his wife spent living in Paris while he worked in an unnamed advertising agency

A dazzling debut that is at once a lightly erudite novel of ideas and a darkly charming love story set on an island off the coast of Maine-the perfect sophisticated summer read. By turns funny, charming, and tragic, Rosecrans Baldwin's debut novel takes us inside the heart and mind of Dr. Victor Aaron, a leading Alzheimer's researcher at the Soborg Institute on Mount Desert Island in Maine. Victor spends his days alternating between long hours in the sterile lab and running through memories of his late wife, Sara. He has preserved their marriage as a sort of perfect, if tumultuous, duet between two opposite but precisely compatible souls. But one day, in the midst of organizing his already hyperorganized life, Victor discovers a series of index cards covered in Sara's handwriting. They chronicle the major "changes in direction" of their marriage, written as part of a brief fling with couples counseling. Sara's version of their great love story is markedly different from his own, which, for the eminent memory specialist, is a startling revelation. Victor is forced to reevaluate and relive each moment of their marriage, never knowing is the revisions will hurt or hearten. Meanwhile, as Victor's faith in memory itself unravels, so too does his precisely balanced support network, a group of strong women-from his lab assistant to Aunt Betsy, doddering doyenne of the island-that had, so far, allowed him to avoid grieving. Rosecrans Baldwin shows himself here to be a young writer bursting with talent and imagination who deftly handles this aching love story with sensitivity and unexpected maturity. You Lost Me There is a treasure of a book filled with beautiful, intelligent prose, a book that wears its smarts lightly and probes its emotions deeply.Watch a Video


  • Zbr
First of all, how friggin' cool is the name Rosecrans Baldwin? Definitely begs for some notoriety, don't you think? Well, after reading this tremendously affecting book, I have little doubt Baldwin is on the fame track.

Victor Aaron is a fairly well-known Alzheimer's researcher running a university lab in Maine. He is struggling with the recent death of his screenwriter wife, Sara, with whom he had only recently gotten back together after an estrangement. One sleepless night he finds a stack of index cards on which Sara was chronicling what she determined to be the instances in their marriage where their relationship changed direction. (This was an exercise recommended to them by a marriage counselor.) As Victor reviews more and more of the cards, he realizes his perceptions of their marriage--and some of his memories of their relationship--differed significantly from Sara's, which leads him to question much of their past. This soul-searching, plus his encounters with his childhood best friend, his goddaughter, his lab director, his wife's eccentric aunt and a woman with whom he has had a romantic encounter, leads Victor to at least a few moments of reckoning.

I really enjoyed the general premise of this book, as it tried to examine the concept of what makes a memory, and how two people might see the same situation completely differently. Baldwin is a gifted writer and I found the story very readable and compelling. I did struggle, however, because I didn't find any of the characters very appealing at first glance (and some characters had so many quirks they never appealed to me). I just couldn't understand why Victor wanted to deal with so many unpleasant people. But that's what life is about: taking the good with the bad. And that was the appeal of You Lost Me There: some parts I loved and some parts I didn't.
  • Mananara
'You Lost Me There' is a good debut novel from Rosecran Baldwin. I was a bit let down by the ending, expecting maybe some big twist or revelation. It's not that kind of book and, upon reflection, I credit Baldwin for staying true to the characters. It's an ending very much in synch with the pace and style of the overall work.

The book's main theme is a sly one: Dr. Victor Aaron, Ph.D. and Alzheimer's expert, seems to have a different memory of his marriage to recently deceased wife than she had. Her memories are revealed, one by one, in a series of index cards she'd written for counseling sessions in which she was asked by her therapist to recount five 'turning points' in her marriage. The discovery of these notes and their content come as a shock and comeuppance to Dr. Aaron, both in terms of Sara's clear disappointment (and, sometimes, anger) towards him and in the conflicts they produce in terms of matching his recollections to hers. To his consternation, third parties side confirm her versions.

What becomes slowly clear over the almost 300 pages of this work is that Victor has never fully processed Sara's untimely death. When the force of it does finally hit him some months beyond, his unraveling is very public and not at all pretty. [A great scene for a movie.]
  • X-MEN
Although I did like this story, I wanted to like it more, and it just wouldn't seem to let itself be loved. This could have been because the protagonist never lost the love he felt fo his late wife.
  • Ese
Interesting, well written & it doesn't go for the predictable. A human story w/ scientific background.
  • Vinainl
The set-up for Rosecrans Baldwin's debut novel, You Lost Me There, is certainly intriguing. An Alzheimer researcher wrestles with his own rememories. But his problem is not that he's losing his memory. It's that he can't remember things accurately or definitively or with the same assignation of value as others. And this causes him quite a bit of consternation. Indeed, it nearly ruins his life.

Dr. Victor Aaron's wife Sara has been dead for several years -- perishing in a car crash soon after a reconciliation of their rocky marriage. To cope, Victor has lost himself in his research on a small island off the coast of Maine. When he finds some notecards Sara had written in therapy during a rough patch in their marriage, he's astounded to learn that what she had considered the signature events of their marriage, he can barely remember at all. "If two people have the same experience, but remember it differently, what does that say about their respective minds?" Victor wonders.

That's an easy one, isn't it? The answer is that respective minds are simply different; they see and experience the world differently. Not exactly earth-shattering, is it? But that's the idea Baldwin dwells on for the whole of the novel, and so, to me, the story didn't live up to the intrigue of its original set-up. Besides that reason, the novel fell a bit flat because Victor is such a dunderhead. He's humorless. He's a bore. And he's totally oblivious. Not good qualities for a protagonist, in my view. Furthermore, this novel finally made me realize the book reviewer cliche word "uneven." To emphasize the idea of the inconsistency of memories, Baldwin constantly jumps back and forth in his character's lives, often from paragraph to paragraph, between memories and real-time. The effect is that you're constantly a bit off balance trying to place the memories in some sort of chronology to construct a bigger picture of these characters' lives. Some clunky dialogue (Victor, confused, always asks "What are you talking about?") and some first-novel glitches (how does an early-20s girl who only brings a purple backpack for a summer stay suddenly have an evening gown and high heels?) also add to the sense of unevenness.

Finally, though, as Victor begins to slowly yank himself out of his malaise, helped along by some rather strange circumstances (a dream-like conversation with his dead wife, i.e.), the novel does gain some momentum and becomes a bit more fun. There are some very well-rendered and affecting final scenes which don't altogether save the novel, but do show Baldwin's promise as a writer.

To sum up what I consider to be about a three-star novel, it'd be really easy to make a joke like "No, Mr. Baldwin, you actually lost ME there," but I won't. (even though I just did...Did you laugh? No? Damn.) This definitely wasn't my favorite book ever, but I'd say if you're interested in getting on the ground floor of a writer from whom you'll surely hear, I'd recommend You Lost Me There for that reason.