almediah.fr
» » Destination: Void

Download Destination: Void eBook

by Frank Herbert

Download Destination: Void eBook
ISBN:
0425062635
Author:
Frank Herbert
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Berkley (May 15, 1983)
EPUB book:
1304 kb
FB2 book:
1144 kb
DJVU:
1952 kb
Other formats
mobi doc lit mbr
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
143


Destination: Void is a science fiction novel by American author Frank Herbert, the first set in the Destination: Void universe

Destination: Void is a science fiction novel by American author Frank Herbert, the first set in the Destination: Void universe. It first appeared in Galaxy Magazine in August 1965, under the title "Do I Wake or Dream?", but was published as Destination: Void, in book form the following year.

An emergency skeleton crew sees only one chance for survival: to create an artificial consciousness in the Earthling’s primary computer, which could guide them to their destination. or could destroy the human race.

Destination Void book. Frank Herbert's classic novel that begins the epic Pandora Sequence (written with Bill Ransom), which also includes The Jesus Incident, The Lazarus Effect, and The Ascension Factor.

Destination: Void is a science fiction novel by American author Frank Herbert, the first set in the Destination: Void universe

Destination: Void is a science fiction novel by American author Frank Herbert, the first set in the Destination: Void universe. It first appeared in Galaxy Magazine in August 1965, under the title "Do I Wake or Dream?", but was published as Destination: Void in book form the following year. In the novel’s future, humans have overcome the problems of cloning, and are moving on to artificial intelligence, which isn’t going so great.

Frank Herbert 1965 Revised 1978. I SAW THE pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together

Frank Herbert 1965 Revised 1978. I SAW THE pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together.

Frank Herbert (1920-1986) created the most beloved novel in the annals of science fiction, Dune

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Frank Herbert (1920-1986) created the most beloved novel in the annals of science fiction, Dune. He was a man of many facets, of countless passageways that ran through an intricate mind.

This book crushed my skull and made my brain meats ooze out of my nose hole

This book crushed my skull and made my brain meats ooze out of my nose hole. The plot hinges, ostensibly, on a project to create artificial consciousness, but what it really becomes is a discussion.

Prequel to Frank Herbert & Bill Ransom’s Pandora Sequence

Prequel to Frank Herbert & Bill Ransom’s Pandora Sequence. An emergency skeleton crew sees only one chance for survival: to create an artificial consciousness in the Earthling’s primary computer, which could guide them to their destination. or could destroy the human race

The starship Earthling, filled with thousands of hybernating colonists en route to a new world at Tau Ceti, is stranded beyond the solar system when the shipâ?s three Organic Mental Coresâ?disembodied human brains that control the vesselâ?s functionsâ?go insane. An emergency skeleton crew sees only one chance for survival: to create an artificial consciousness in the Earthlingâ?s primary computer, which could guide them to their destination . . . or could destroy the human race. Frank Herbertâ?s classic novel that begins the epic Pandora Sequence (written with Bill Ransom), which also includes The Jesus Incident, The Lazarus Effect, and The Ascension Factor.
  • Flash_back
Four-dimensional construction, he reminded himself. "Listen, we have to construct a net in depth that contains complex world-line tracks. It has to absorb nonsynchronous transmissions. It has to abstract discrete patterns out of the impulse oversend. The important thing is structure— not the material . The important thing is topology. That’s the key to the whole damn problem! "

Easy for you to say, Bickle! You lost me after "Listen".

I was listening to the Audible audio book version of Destination Void when I realized something sounded familiar: I had accidentally started thirty minutes before my last point and despite careful listening (this book demands full attention) I barely recognized what I'd just heard. Frankly, I barely understood it anyway.

Herbert's tackled a difficult subject - the nature of consiousness and the creation of a conscious AI - and the resulting novel, while interesting, is a tough nut to crack. There's the subject itself and there's the dense techno-babble (most of which sounds outdated but likely was obscure and idiosyncratic even when first written) which combine into a dense treatise that is only intermittently intelligible. Personally, I had to get the Kindle ebook and re-read the novel slowly and carefully.

I enjoyed Destination Void but it's hard to recommend. If you're interested in sci-fi novels involving space travel, consciousness and intelligence there are other more recent novels like Peter Watts' Blind Sight.

If you're continuing with Herbert's Pandora series, the books do get friendlier.
  • Gio
That Frank Herbert wrote this in 1965 (even if it was updated in 78). The information is so cutting edge that it is still little understood by the public. The dialog is a little stiff compared to some of his later books, but as usual the ideas are huge. This is what keeps me coming back to Herbert...not clever quips in dialog, not overly complex plot lines. Rather, a treatment of the big ideas that propel humanity forward. The other aspect I like so far is that I could see how this story could even be considered pre-butlerian, as if these books opened Pandora's box. I just have to see. Looking forward to the rest of the Pandora Sequence.
  • Kare
I wish as a whole our society could say that we regularly produced writers who could write this well.

That said, there seemed to be some minor issues with the transfer to digital, based on the overall quality versus specific instances. I'd give the transfer 4 stars.

The story itself brings up and considers a few physics and computer theories while refraining from hand-holding. I appreciated Herbert's restraint by not spelling it all out in a redundant fashion. Instead he takes the time to develop explanations and use them as tools for plot momentum and foil. The character development also carries well.

Overall, I read for pleasure and simply enjoy how Herbert elevated the story past mindless drivel while keeping it fun.
  • Mezilabar
This is Frank Herbert emerging. I found this book to be stuck between the late pulp of the 50s and early 60s and the initial hardcore sci-fi that defined the genre in the 70s. The plot, the concept and the resolution are all fascinating. Unfortunately, there are far too many times when Herbert "explains" what characters are doing by using psychobabble and completely manufactured terms and technical references. It all serves to add an unnecessary layer of literary mayonnaise on top of an otherwise good club sandwich.
  • Najinn
While I really enjoy Frank Herbert's work (Dune, etc.), he is not casual reading. There are many, many asides where the person is thinking something. This sometimes makes the reading feel choppy and harder to follow. There are also lots of characters doing this so you're forced to keep in your mind, not only the action, but all the subtleties of thought in each of these folks. As a result, I'm finding this a more difficult read than I enjoy when reading Sci-Fi. I'm now on the 2nd book in this quadrilogy.
  • Hiclerlsi
Great story and writing. I've been going back and reading classic fiction and this is one of the books that really stood out. It's a simple story written with just a few characters and the writing is engaging and exciting. The characters are facing an life-threatening disaster and are working to fix it on the fly. It's got enough technical jargon to feel authentic but avoids sounding trite or silly. It's the first book of a series that I haven't read any more of (yet), but I look forward to.
  • Yozshunris
As a prequel to the Pandora Sequence this was a little disappointing. A ton of very abstruse conversation between four individuals about the nature of consciousness, a lot of which I simply didn't understand. That said, it still was suspenseful a lot of the time and the dialogue was rich and realistic.
Very well written and a very good premise but so verbose on the minutiae of construction and ontology of AI that it just got boring for me. It's no Dune.