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Download The Bloody Countess: Atrocities of Erzsebet Bathory (Solar Blood History) eBook

by Valentine Penrose

Download The Bloody Countess: Atrocities of Erzsebet Bathory (Solar Blood History) eBook
ISBN:
0971457824
Author:
Valentine Penrose
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Solar Books; Revised, Translation edition (November 3, 2006)
Pages:
156 pages
EPUB book:
1359 kb
FB2 book:
1217 kb
DJVU:
1575 kb
Other formats
lrf mobi lrf txt
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
767


Countess: Atrocities of Erzsebet Bathory (Solar Blood History). Life and Times of Elisabeth Bathory, the Blood Countess Paperback.

The Bloody Countess: Atrocities of Erzsebet Bathory (Solar Blood History). Countess Dracula : Life and Times of Elisabeth Bathory, the Blood Countess Paperback. Valentine Penrose (1898-1978) was a French Surrealist writer and collagist. She married the British Surrealist Roland Penrose in 1925.

The Bloody Countess book. After discovering and falling in love with Solar Books the other week, I realized that I already had one of their books-The Bloody Countess. Oct 05, 2008 Max Renn rated it it was amazing. This book follows in the vein of La Bas and Benedetti's Bluebeard-lyrical and poetic, we are able to see not only the actions but also the psychological and historical affecting and surrounding Erzsebet Bathory.

THE BLOODY COUNTESS: Atrocities Of Erzsebet Bathory. by Alexander Trocchi and Valentine Penrose. Descended from one of the most ancient aristocratic families of Europe, Erzsebet Bathory bore the psychotic aberrations of centuries of intermarriage.

Descended from one of the most ancient aristocratic families of Europe, Erzsebet Bathory bore the psychotic aberrations of centuries of intermarriage. From adolescence she indulged in sadistic lesbian fantasies, where only the spilling of a woman’s blood could satisfy her urges.

Valentine Penrose affiliated with the surrealists, she was also the wife of British Surrealist Sir Roland Penrose. This is her only full-length book

Valentine Penrose affiliated with the surrealists, she was also the wife of British Surrealist Sir Roland Penrose. This is her only full-length book. Alexander Trocchi was a Scottish novelist affiliated with the Beats.

Valentine Penrose wrote surrealist poetry, although she is perhaps best known for her biography of the serial killer Elizabeth Báthory (1560-1614). The Bloody Countess: Atrocities of Erzsébet Báthory. Trocchi, Alexander (translator). Her poetry reflects her experience of automatic writing, collage and painting techniques such as Max Ernst’s frottage and Wolfgang Paalen’s fumage. It is said that her works stem from transgression and the reconstruction of defiance. For a female artist of her time it was unconventional for a women to illustrate such erotic and violent works.

The Bloody Countess Atrocities of Erzsebet Bathory by Valentine Penrose download. File name: The Bloody Countess - Atrocities of Erzsebet Bathory by Valentine Penrose.

Tags: Murder (1), Non Fiction (1), Serial Killer (1), Bloody Countess (1).

Manufacturer: The Tears Release date: 1 September 2000 ISBN-10 : 1840680563 ISBN-13: 9781840680560. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Bloody Countess: Atrocities of. .Radleigh Valentine Mind, Body & Spirit Books.

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Descended from an aristocratic European family, Erzsebet Bathory bore the psychotic aberrations of centuries of intermarriage. From adolescence on, she indulged in sadistic lesbian fantasies, and by middle age, had regressed to a mirror-fixated state of pathological necro-sadism involving witchcraft, torture, blood-drinking, and more. Her 16th century reign of cruelty remains unsurpassed in the annals of mass murder, with the Countess? depredations on the virgin girls of the Carpathians leading to some 650 deaths id her many castles equipped with torture chambers. This is a true, disturbing case history of a female psychopath, a chillingly lyrical account beautifully translated by Alexander Trocchi, evoking the decadent melancholy of doomed, delinquent aristocracy in a dark age of superstition. The book contains an appendix featuring actual transcripts from Bathorys trial and has inspired many horror movies, such as Hammers Countess Dracula.

De Sade did not know of Erzsbet Bathorys existence, but doubtless her atrocities would have roused his most vicious excitement. -- Georges Bataille, The Tears Of Eros

  • Folsa
As described. Fast ship. Would use again.
  • Xlisiahal
It has great history but hard to find it all through the poetry style in it.
  • Arashigore
Detailed account but written in a formal language that makes reading difficult and unpleasant. you have to skim for details amidst a lot of useless information
  • Moswyn
Enjoyed reading this book at times I felt like it lost my attention but pushing through I got pulled back into it.
  • Foxanayn
I find this book one of the most impressive case studies about serial killers. Although women comprise only 3% of serial killers ever identified (and they usually opt for less violent methods of killing such as poisoning),it is the sadist and nihilistic behavior of this female "Beast" that really surpassess all her male colleagues, even those of our modern times. This is a tragic example of social and political power unchecked by the restraints of the law and moral conciousness, combined to whatever pathological trait can be indetified in her flawed character. She rightly deserves her place along the famous genocides of all times such as Hitler, Stalin and Milosevic. It is a pity that more psychological analysis is missing. Otherwise, it is a great maiden study that can stimulate further research on the dark side of the murderer's mind.
  • Goldendragon
Valentine Penrose was a surrealist, and her quasi-biography reads like a fever dream, which is not all bad. Translated by Alexander Trocchi from French into English, Penrose chronicles the life and death of Erzsebet Bathory. While Penrose at times writes herself into a frenzy detailing the alleged torture and murders the countess was arrested and incarcerated for, the central character of Bathory remains frustratingly obtuse. Penrose believed her to be a bad seed from birth, a psychopath influenced more by her horoscope (which supposedly led her to Sapphic indulgences almost against her will: "...the influx of the masculine and warlike Mars is at the bottom of this, and a woman born under this sign, influenced by the cruel spears of Mars, does not shrink from wounding, particularly in love, whatever is young, loving, and feminine.") than the barbarism of that period.

Erzsebet is protrayed as a narcissist so bizarre that she neglected her children and household obligations so that she might sponge herself first in rotted herbs, later in clotted gore, so that her skin would glow unnaturally white so that she could, well sit in front of a mirror for hours at a time admiring her pale complexion. Likewise, her co-conspirators are ciphers, hag-like witches and an obscene dwarf straight out of gothic fantasy.

The saddest aspect of the book, and I believe Penrose did feel empathy for the victims, is the fact that not a single male contemporary of the girls who were tortured and mutilated, not a Knight or a page or a serf, ever felt compelled to try and save the maids from their fate. Likewise, peasant women, some of them mothers of the would-be victims, took an active role in procuring "nubile" victims with full knowledge of the atrocities that awaited the girls. There is nothing in Penrose's tale that accounts for this wide-spread apathy. It's as chilling as the Countess herself.
  • Wenes
Not any eventual mystical or astrological power (that the author seems to believe in sometimes) but of the family a person is born into; other factors like the education and rolemodels are also extremely important in the personality of the person one becomes. Unfortunately all the elements joined in 1560, creating a monster of impressive proportions and unbelievable terror. Born in the Hungarian Highest class, powerfull, intelligent,mentally unstable and frustated because of a repressed education, when she found the freedom to do wathever she wanted, suffering came.

The author is no historian - point taken - she is a poetess of the surrealist movement, and that brings several advantages and disadvantages in this biography. The power and the emotions brought to life reading this book are quite strong, and she can sucessfully empathise with the monster (wich is an impressive feat that only a poet could do) being very impartial in her analyses. The downside is that she had a clear lack of material about the events related directly to Erzsébet Bathory. The book is also weakly structured , with too many chronological jumps, the repetition of concepts, almost with as many information about French Marechal Gilles de Rais then about Countess Bathory. But it is worthy comparing both characters, the analysis and dissecation makes sense and becomes the major conclusion of the author explaining the differences between these monsters that appear similar, but in essence are very different. The countess believed she had the right to kill hundreds of her peasant girls! Gilles de Rais lived a tormented life trying to please God and the Devil at the same time.

Hungary was a brutally savage land in ancient and medieval times. There remained old beliefs and superstitions, their nobility was known for bravery and savagery, and Christianity was only skin deep. The author explores (maybe exagerating a bit), the history, myths, superstitions and geography of the land; too many times forgetting completely the "storyline"!

The horrible tortures, and the sadism are described in detail; and the author proves that the tendency for torture started clearly before the worries about her vanishing beauty. Obviously with age she became the feared "vampire", that tried to steal youth and beauty...to no avail.

The author also focused on the political and religious situation created by this protestant countess in a period of severe religious tensions. The grand Paladin of Hungary, also a protestant had to arrest her and quietly try to stifle the entire affair...but the legend of the Bloody countess was too strong.

The lack of footnotes and bibliography impairs further investigation, and it becomes very difficult to separate events from the suppositions of the author. But the text is beautifully written and the reader is transported to a time and place where everybody feared the witch, the vampire and the wolf. For the artistic value of this book I would give four stars.