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Download Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces (MIT Press) eBook

by P. L. Podvig

Download Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces (MIT Press) eBook
ISBN:
0262162024
Author:
P. L. Podvig
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
The MIT Press; 1st edition (November 1, 2001)
Pages:
620 pages
EPUB book:
1968 kb
FB2 book:
1934 kb
DJVU:
1584 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
716


Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces. Foreword by Frank N. von Hippel.

Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces. This encyclopedic book provides comprehensive data about Soviet and Russian strategic weapons, payloads, and delivery systems and on the nuclear complex that supports them. The data are drawn from open, primarily Russian sources.

A veritable treasure trove of information for all students of Russian nuclear weapons and strategic policy questions. Sidney D. Drell, Professor Emeritus, Stanford University

Pavel Podvig, e. Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces (Cambridge, Mass.

Pavel Podvig, e. Pavel Podvig, e. Main Index Archives Presentations . Recent Entries.

Please use the TRANSLATE button above to see machine translation of this post. Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces, Pavel Podvig, Oleg Bucharin, MIT Press, Cambridge, 2001, ISBN 0-262-16202-4. 37 USD, 700 stran, formát mezi A5 a A4, kvalitní papír, pevná vazba, několik ilustrací, žádné fotografie. originál: Raketnye vojska strategičeskogo naznačenija). Tato anglická publikace, vzniklá překložení ruského originálu) je ojedinělou obecně dostupnou knihou zabývající se sovětskými a dnešními ruskými jadernými silami.

Table 1. The composition of Russia's strategic nuclear forces according . The composition of Russia's strategic nuclear forces according to official data (the quantity of deployed warheads was derived). Podvig, "Modern anti-missile defense systems and the ABM treaty", Center for arms contol, energy and environmental studies, MPTI, Allegro press, 1994. Polyakov, "Russia's strategic forces: Present and future", Nevskiy Bastion, N 1, 1995, to be published.

Authors: Podvig, Pavel, Von Hippel, Frank N. RUSSIAN STRATEGIC NUCLEAR FORCES. Country of Publication. History & Military. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 13 brand new listings. Deep Cuts and De-Alerting: A Russian Perspective. Russia has taken important steps in modernizing its nuclear forces since early 2013, including the continued development and deployment of new intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), construction of ballistic missile submarines, and development of a new strategic bomber.

Although the book addresses the Russian weapons-development complex, with its labs and production facilities, it includes scarce data on national nuclear-weapons storage sites, which hold most of the Russian inventory.

This encyclopedic book provides comprehensive data about Soviet and Russian strategic weapons, payloads, and delivery systems and on the nuclear complex that supports them. The data are drawn from open, primarily Russian sources. All the information is presented chronologically, arranged by individual systems and facilities, and is not available elsewhere in a single volume.

Following an overview of the history of Soviet strategic forces, the book discusses the structure of the political and military leadership in the Soviet Union and Russia, the structure of the Russian military and military industry, nuclear planning procedures, and the structure of the command and control system. It describes the nuclear warhead production complex and the Soviet nuclear weapon development program. It then focuses on the individual services that constitute the so-called strategic triad -- land-based intercontinental ballistic missiles, the strategic submarine fleet, and strategic aviation. It presents an overview of Soviet strategic defense, including air defense systems, the Moscow missile defense system, the radar and space-based early warning networks, and the space surveillance system. The book also includes a description of the Soviet nuclear testing program, including information on test sites and on all Soviet nuclear tests and peaceful nuclear explosions. It concludes with a look at the future of strategic nuclear weapons in Russia.

  • Mautaxe
Excellent story of the Soviet nuclear forces: RVSN, Navy, and Air Defense Force from roughly the late 1940s through the 1990s and into the early 21rst century. I thought the most interesting chapters were as follows:

• Chapter 3: The Nuclear Weapons Production Complex. This chapter discusses the development of the various nuclear weapons laboratories and production facilities at Arzamas, Chelyabinsk, Sverdlovsk, Penza, Tomsk, Krasnoyarsk and others. There is also discussion of the various government ministries, State Committees, Scientific Research Institutes (NIIs), and Design Bureaus (KBs) associated with the nuclear weapons industry.

• Chapter 4: Strategic Rocket Forces. This chapter discusses the development of the various government ministries, State Committees, Scientific Research Institutes (NIIs), and Design Bureaus (KBs) associated with the ballistic missile, rocket engine, guidance system, and space launching rocket industry. There are also extensive discussions of the development of the numerous Soviet ballistic missiles and tabulations of the missile dimensions, weights, and performance characteristics.

• Chapter 5: Naval strategic Nuclear Forces. This chapter discusses the development of the various government ministries, Scientific Research Institutes (NIIs), and Design Bureaus (KBs) associated with the submarine and submarine launched ballistic missile (SLBM) industry. There are also extensive discussions of the development of the numerous Soviet submarine launched ballistic missiles and tabulations of the missile dimensions, weights, and performance characteristics. Even more interesting, I thought, were the discussions of the development and designs of the associated submarines, both conventional and nuclear powered (Zulu through Typhoon).

• Chapter 6: Strategic Aviation. This chapter discusses the development of the various government ministries, Scientific Research Institutes (NIIs), and Experimental Design Bureaus (OKBs) associated with the long-range bomber and turbojet engine and turboprop engine projects. There are also extensive tabulations of the bomber dimensions, weights, and performance characteristics.

Other chapters cover subjects such as the several strategic arms limitation and reduction treaties and nuclear weapons limitation treaties between the US and the USSR. What I found especially interesting were the Soviet viewpoints on the effects of these various treaties and how they came about.

For a really great story of the Soviet ballistic missile and space launching rocket development, I highly recommend the 4-volume book series “Rockets and People” by Boris Chertok.

For a detailed story of the development of the first modern Soviet long-range bomber, I suggest “Tupolev Tu-4: The First Soviet Strategic Bomber” by Yefim Gordon et. al (2014). It tells in detail the Soviet effort to copy the design of the Boeing B-29 and then mass-produce it.

For an additional much more detailed story of the development of the Soviet anti-aircraft and ABM missile systems, I recommend the book “Intercept 1961 – The Birth of Soviet Missile Defense” by Gruntman (2015). It is an excellent account of the development of those missile systems from the 1940s and 1950s through the 1980s. It’s a detailed history of the entire background to what the Soviets did to accomplish that item. There is also extensive technical discussion of how the Soviets solved the theoretical, research, and engineering problems involved in developing the necessary missiles, tracking and scanning radars, communication systems, and computer systems. There is also much information on what the Americans knew about all this by means of radio and telemetry eavesdropping from secret bases in Turkey, Iran, and Pakistan. The book contains numerous photos from American U-2 overflights from 1956 - 1960 and from the early spy satellites such as Corona and Big Bird. There is also information on related Soviet ICBM and IRBM missile programs and their associated organization leaders such as Yangel and Cholomei.

And for a really good book on the magnitude and national economic influence of the Soviet military industrial complex (MIC), I suggest reading the book “The Price of the Past -- Russia’s Struggle with the Legacy of a Militarized Economy” by Gaddy (1996). It describes the history of the Soviet military industry from the 1930s through the eventual collapse of the USSR in the 1980s and 1990s. There is considerable detail on the function of the Military Industrial Committee (VPK) and it's subordinate industrial ministries. The best part of the book is the discussion on how the military industry (which included the space and rocket programs) really accomplished its function and the economic consequences. Essentially, it plundered the civilian economic sector with impunity. Massive forced subsidies and hidden costs were just part of the game. The book provides plenty of statistics on the extent of the MIC in terms of labor, investment, and influence of the MIC on the Soviet economy and the society in general.
  • Vetitc
Once upon a time I was a Missileman in the Titan II Program. Nowadays people use the more Politically Correct (and Gender non-specific)"Missileer". But back then, we didn't know a lot about Russian (Soviet) ICBMs besides the fact they were big,dirty, not particularly accurate and pointed at the Site that I was pulling my alerts at and at the AF Base where my Wife was staying. We would get periodic classified briefings on Soviet weaponry, but usually only with very fuzzy pictures and spotty (mis)information. Since then I have received the occasional unclassified briefing during Missile Group reunions; but NOTHING like this.

Now - 40 years later, this text has given me an opportunity to see just what I was really facing across the North Pole, and what my likely targets would have been for my trusty W-53(9 MT)/Mark 6 RV warhead. I believe the current phrase would be "OMG"!

I have NEVER seen such a massive amount of detail on the Soviet Nuclear Program packed into the 690 pages of one relatively cheap and unclassified book. Want to know the details of every Soviet Nuclear test from 1947 through 1988 ? They're here - 86 pages worth . Want to know where the Soviet ICBMs were designed and built ? - check pages 159/170. Curious about how many SLBM submarines (by type) were in the Soviet fleet any year ? Table 5-1 will tell you. Want to know what the Soviets actually called their missiles(Hint -they did not use NATO code names...), production details, drawings, etc.? Here , you will find out the answers in mind-numbing detail. And on and on.

Now, the information in the text is current only as of 2001, so don't look for what has happened recently. But if you are looking for a rock-solid reference on what the former Bad Guys had and did that directly threatened the US as a Nation for the 50 years of the Cold War ,this is it.

Perhaps the finest recommendation as to the worth of this test is that the KGB is recently alleged to have confiscated all Russian-language copies of the text, destroyed the computer print discs and tried to arrest several of the Russian conributors!

HIGHLY Recommended!
  • Alexandra
Pavel Podvig's Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces was initially available only in Russian, however when it was finally updated and released in English we received the absolute most authoritative and detailed report on the subject available in the civilian sector.

Podvig's effort is to be highly commended, as he has compiled an impressive amount of research, much of it relating to the technical side, though good write-ups and historical overviews are included. From R&D to production and finally deployment, every Soviet/Russian ICBM, SLBM and Strategic Bomber system is discussed in extensive technical detail, including such well researched and hard to find details such as Circular Error Probability of all Russian strategic systems.

The book is a heavy volume containing nearly 700 pages, none of it filler, so you can imagine the sheer amount of information in this volume for anyone interested in attaining a deeper understanding of the subject. Given the price, it really is a no-brainer. Furthermore Pavel Podvig maintains a frequently updated and detailed web site which continually adds newer information, essentially making this a "living research" project on the subject. You can locate his site here:

Seems Amazon edits out any links in reviews, so to try again Podvig's site can be found at russianforces.org

Once again, for the incredibly low price this book is offered at, you have nothing to lose, and a wealth of knowledge to gain.

Disclaimer: I am in no way affiliated with Mr. Podvig, aside from being someone who has been won over by his dedication and research to the subject at hand.