almediah.fr
» » John Crow's Devil

Download John Crow's Devil eBook

by Maron James

Download John Crow's Devil eBook
ISBN:
1888451823
Author:
Maron James
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Akashic Books (January 1, 2005)
Pages:
226 pages
EPUB book:
1414 kb
FB2 book:
1410 kb
DJVU:
1652 kb
Other formats
azw txt mbr lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
128


John Crow's Devil book. Marlon James writes conversation in dialect, perhaps one reason his first book was not accepted immediately

John Crow's Devil book. Marlon James writes conversation in dialect, perhaps one reason his first book was not accepted immediately. Now, of course, dialect seems the most basic effort one can make to represent a culture. But James also manages the difficult feat of keeping readers unsure if they know what exactly is happening without losing the thread altogether, or giving up.

John Crow's Devil - Marlon James. John Crow's Devil is an amazing first novel, with extremely interesting, well-developed characters. It's an interesting take on sin vs redemption. Neither the Rum Preacher or the Apostle are quite what they appear.

James divides his time between Minnesota and New York. What makes a good book to you? That is the question. I read James's "The Book of the Night Women". I would say this book was much more graphic than the book of the night women. I understood most of it as I have studied the cultural and religious trends discussed in the book.

John Crow's Devil is a novel about religious mania, redemption, sexual obsession, and the eternal . Marlon James spins his magical web in this novel and we willingly suspend disbelief, rewarded by the window he opens to Jamaica (and a world) rarely portrayed in fiction.

John Crow's Devil is a novel about religious mania, redemption, sexual obsession, and the eternal struggle inside all of us between the righteous and the wicked. Elizabeth Nunez, author of Bruised Hibiscus, winner of the American Book Award. This stunning debut novel tells the story of a biblical struggle in a remote Jamaican village in 1957.

John crows devil, . Before Pastor Bligh come to Gibbeah nobody ever see a man of God drink

John crows devil, . John Crow's Devil, . Before Pastor Bligh come to Gibbeah nobody ever see a man of God drink. Some people say Second Book of John, verse one to eleven, say that Jesus turn water into wine, so him must did drink wine too. Three man who sit down outside the bar all day say that him is man after all and man have right to get drunk just as him have right to scratch him balls when him want to scratch him balls or beat him woman when she don’t act right.

Used availability for Marlon James's John Crow's Devil. September 2015 : UK Paperback.

To Ché, that other revolutionary, and to my mother, who must not read this book. Three little children. With doves on their shoulders. They’re countin out the Devil. With two fingers on their hands.

10 5 Author: Marlon James Narrator: Robin Miles. In this, his third novel, a failing preacher in 1957 Jamaica is ousted by a fiery newcomer who sends the congregation into a frenzy of spiritual awakening-and violence.

A Brief History of Seven Killings (Oneworld 2014), his third novel, won the Man Booker Prize, the American Book Award, the Anisfield-Wolf Fiction Prize, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and featured in over twenty best books of the year lists. His short fiction and non-fiction has appeared in Esquire and Granta.

Fiction. African-American Studies. This stunning debut novel tells the story of a biblical struggle in a remote Jamaican village in 1957. With language as taut as classic works by Cormac McCarthy, and a richness reminiscent of early Toni Morrison, Marlon James reveals his unique narrative command that will firmly establish his place as one of today's freshest, most talented young writers. Set in the village of Gibbeah, were magic coexists with religion and good and evil are never as they seem, JOHN CROW'S DEVIL is a novel about religious mania, redemption, sexual obsession, and the eternal struggle inside all of us between the righteous and the wicked.
  • Kare
I absolutely loved reading this book. Actually, there were certainly some pieces of the book so disturbing I can only hope to forget them. What makes a good book to you? That is the question. I read James's "The Book of the Night Women". I would say this book was much more graphic than the book of the night women. I understood most of it as I have studied the cultural and religious trends discussed in the book. But if certain themes are totally foreign to you, you may not pick up on what the author is hinting at. It was a stupendous, real, gritty work.
  • Yggfyn
This is an extremely powerful and original story, exposing a very talented and creative author with great promise. It is a dramatic portrait of social relations in a small rural village in Jamaica in the 1950s that rings true to the people and their culture, particularly the role of religion in their lives. Most of the dialogue is in Jamaican dialect or patwa. It is also a story about the ambiguities of good and evil that approaches biblical proportions. I was mesmerized by the book until the end, which I found very disappointing. The story is often raw, graphic, even shocking, unnecessarily so in my view. I look forward to more polished efforts from Marlon James. Incidentally, Johncrow is a Jamaican term for the turkey vulture, a large, soaring scavenger commonly seen if not ubiquitous.
  • GawelleN
I have just read Mr. James three available novels in reverse order, reading John Crow's Devil just now. Even after a steady diet of his books one after another, every one is fresh and engrossing. In this case the eternal conflict of good versus evil is played out in many fascinating twists and turns. The descriptions of both character and countryside are gorgeous, and as in "Seven Killings" terrific humor and phenomenal
presentation of dialect is a strong suit for Mr. James.
  • Manazar
Great story, great writing but the ending left me....unsatisfied somehow.
  • Akinozuru
"Come now, church, who is ready to be violent for the Lord?"

There's something about organized religion that can be really terrifying at times, with the way it can feed on fear and trump all logic and decency. This is illustrated to the nth degree in the unsettling debut novel by rising star Marlon James. The book tracks the downfall and destruction of the small Jamaican village of Gibbeah, in the wake of a religious battle between two evangelical preachers for the control of both the Holy Sepulchral Full Gospel Church of St. Thomas Apostolic as well as the very soul of Gibbeah. It all starts on the day that Hector Bligh (the "Rum Preacher"), a drunk priest who's lost his way, is kicked out of the church by a charismatic new arrival, a fire-and-brimstone preacher calling himself Apostle York, who has intentions to purify Gibbeah, even if it means Old Testament judgement.

"The Pastor now drank day and night. He was spiraling downward and would have taken the village with him were it not for the other, who lead them instead to a light blacker than the thickest darkness.
He came like a thief on a night colored silver."

Many might consider this novel magical realism and they would be right. But maybe there should be a sub-genre of "black"-magical realism, for a book like this one, so filled with Obeah and omens of black vultures (john crows). And do I dare call this a satire? Because at times I wanted to chuckle, but mostly to keep myself from being so horrified at the events that I would chuck the book across the room. Maybe that's what makes a great dark satire! And James is a confident and terrifically skilled writer who handles this balance perfectly. One of his effective techniques is the occasional passage that uses a point of view that seems to come from the collective gossip of the village itself, sort of a small-town Greek chorus in a Jamaican tragedy play showing the mob mentality that can come from a town gripped in religious fervor. I loved the way that the town's hypocrisy and secrets slowly began to be revealed and ultimately lead to its downfall. James also created a couple of well-illustrated female characters in the Widow Greenfield and especially the tragic Lucinda, who was endlessly fascinating to read.

"Lucinda was to be the bride of Christ but her ring finger got lost in a thatch of pubic hair. It was that damn Apostle. Him and those bold red books and the bold red tip of his circumcision."

I really enjoyed this one, although at times the author's wordsmithing got in the way of narrative pacing. But I was engaged throughout and would definitely recommend it. It really made me want to revisit his epic novel from last year, A Brief History of Seven Killings. I read that long book while shooting a movie last year, which I think was a mistake. I read John Crow's Devil when I had lots of time to focus my attention and get lost in the story. With three respected novels, Marlon James is definitely an author to watch and wait for what he does next.

"God judgement a no play-play judgement. God not romping with we."
  • Cerar
I love Marlon James book "The Book of the Night Women". I think should have read this book first. It was good, just not as brilliant as the book I just mentioned
  • Fearlessdweller
Pulls you into the story as if you were living in the village, always wanting to know what happened to whom and why. Lots of humour, West Indian culture, and true country living. Thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. Brought back memories of old saying and folklore from growing up in the Caribbean.
I read James' second novel ("The Book of Night Women")first and loved it, so I started looking for other novels written by him and found this one. I haven't finished reading it but it's wonderfully written. I am Jamaican-American and grew up listening to my Jamaican-born parents speaking patois and using the same lyrical phrases that James references in his novel. The plot is very interesting and the religious overtones and poetic verses are what James does best! I can't wait to see how this ends. Another great read from Marlon James...he never disappoints.