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by Simon Prebble,Dan Simmons

Download Drood: A Novel eBook
ISBN:
1600244637
Author:
Simon Prebble,Dan Simmons
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hachette Audio; Abridged edition (February 9, 2009)
EPUB book:
1440 kb
FB2 book:
1106 kb
DJVU:
1847 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
442


Dan Simmons is the award-winning author of several novels, including the New York Times bestsellers Olympos and . Dan Simmons sure has a talent for writing

Dan Simmons is the award-winning author of several novels, including the New York Times bestsellers Olympos and The Terror. He lives in Colorado. Dan Simmons sure has a talent for writing. This was the second book of his that I read and both were so well crafted that I came away highly impressed by his skills as an author both times. This book is more about Charles Dickens then it is about the title character, Drood. Mr. Simmons recreates the Victorian Era very realistically. Wilke Collins is the narrator.

Drood: A Novel Audiobook. Dan Simmons (Author), Simon Prebble (Narrator), Hachette Audio (Publisher) & 0 more. com recommended it to me. I read the description and immediately HAD to have this book. The below summary is quoted from Publishers Weekly: Bestseller Simmons (The Terror) brilliantly imagines a terrifying sequence of events as the inspiration for Dickens's last, uncompleted novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, in this unsettling and complex thriller.

Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). This book however at least for me I cannot recommend and I wished I had read something else instead.

Except as permitted under the . Little, Brown and Company. 237 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10017. Visit our Web site at ww. achetteBookGroup. Little, Brown and Company is a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

Drood is a novel written by Dan Simmons. The book was initially published on February 1, 2009 by Little, Brown and Company. The title comes from Dickens' unfinished novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood.

Drood by Dan Simmons

Drood by Dan Simmons .Droo. s the name and nightmare that obsesses Charles Dickens for the last five years of his life. In the tradition of Drood, a historical mystery in which Sherlock Holmes and Henry James team up to solve a literary puzzle. It's one of those books that creates an unique atmosphere of suspense and horror, which stays with you long after you've read it. 6. Нравится Показать список оценивших.

Drood by Dan Simmons - book cover, description, publication history. Umberto Eco takes his readers on a remarkable journey through the underbelly of world-shattering events. Here is Eco at his most exciting, a book immediately hailed as a masterpiece. Lolita ebook by Vladimir Nabokov - Rakuten Kobo.

Publisher: Hachette Audio, 2009.

An evil legacy comes to life in this classic and ultimately human novel about believable vampires, featuring a brand-new introduction by Dan Simmons.

The only limits you see are the ones you impose on yourself. The Endymion Omnibus (Hyperion Cantos, An evil legacy comes to life in this classic and ultimately human novel about believable vampires, featuring a brand-new introduction by Dan Simmons. Children of the Night will take you to a place that no one knows-yet all of us fear.

On June 9, 1865, while traveling by train to London with his secret mistress, 53-year-old Charles Dickens -- at the height of his powers and popularity, the most famous and successful novelist in the world and perhaps in the history of the world -- hurtled into a disaster that changed his life forever. Did Dickens begin living a dark double life after the accident? Were his nightly forays into the worst slums of London and his deepening obsession with corpses, crypts, murder, opium dens, the use of lime pits to dissolve bodies, and a hidden subterranean London- mere research . . . or something more terrifying?Just as he did in The Terror, Dan Simmons draws impeccably from history to create a gloriously engaging and terrifying narrative. Based on the historical details of Charles Dickens's life and narrated by Wilkie Collins (Dickens's friend, frequent collaborator, and Salieri-style secret rival), DROOD explores the still-unsolved mysteries of the famous author's last years and may provide the key to Dickens's final, unfinished work: The Mystery of Edwin Drood. Chilling, haunting, and utterly original, DROOD is Dan Simmons at his powerful best.
  • Faezahn
Dan Simmons sure has a talent for writing. This was the second book of his that I read and both were so well crafted that I came away highly impressed by his skills as an author both times. This book is more about Charles Dickens then it is about the title character, Drood. Mr. Simmons recreates the Victorian Era very realistically. Wilke Collins is the narrator. And he spins a fantastic tale of pride, evil and probable insanity. The character of Wilke Collins reminded me of the character that Edgar Allan Poe created to narrate his story of The Tell Tale Heart, however you never quite know for certain if Wilke Collins has a firm grasp on reality. I enjoyed this book all the way to the last page.
  • Arith
Sherlockian scholar David Marcum has noted that only a single generation separates the world of Charles Dickens from the world of Conan Doyle. That fact is evident in Dan Simmons’ literary horror novel Drood, for its characters (most prominently an Iago-like Wilkie Collins and his hero and nemesis, the more famous Charles Dickens) haunt the same dismal London alleys to be prowled, a decade or two later, by Sherlock Holmes, Inspector Lestrade, and Jack the Ripper. Moreover, Collins’ private investigator from The Moonstone, Sergeant Cuff, preceded Doyle’s creation by some nineteen years, while Cuff’s real-life model, Charles Frederick Field, was borrowed even earlier for Bleak House. Obviously, finding Conan Doyle connections is not Dan Simmons’ point; nor is his monster Drood (a very different being than the feeble Edwin in Dickens’ last, unfinished novel) really the point either. Rather, Drood is at its heart a long—much too long, alas—meditation on the corrosive effects of hubris, envy, misogyny, and other typically Victorian flaws. The book exhibits the same virtues as The Terror, Simmons’ 2007 re-creation of the lost Franklin Expedition, e.g., exhaustive research, marvelous scene-setting, well-developed characters, and the understanding that (as Stephen King would tell us) true evil arises less from outside forces than within ourselves. Yet, whereas Simmons had the vast Arctic for his canvas in The Terror, Drood plays out in the drawing rooms, theaters, graveyards, and—yes—even sewers of London. This more restricted setting accentuates the novel’s flaws. There is simply not enough plot here for eight hundred pages, and the story bogs down much too often as the author regurgitates factoids turned up in his research. Yet, those who persevere with Drood will be rewarded, for its final twist takes a step back from the supernatural and rises to real pathos. Along the way, readers will learn a great deal more of “The Inimitable” and the author of The Moonstone than they probably knew before. Sadly, that knowledge may prove somewhat disillusioning, for Simmons reminds us that immortal authors were not always admirable men.
  • Hulbine
One of Simmons best efforts! Meticulously researched, delivered in the voice of one of Dicken's contemporaries, a marvelous view of Victorian Britain, it's literary scene and it's leading lights. If Simmons isn't a doctorate in English literature, he should be awarded the degree for his intimate knowledge of classics (as with his novels based on the *Iliad*) and the highly imaginative and fantastic artistic license he takes, this time not with the text and its subjects, but on the lives of its authors. Highly entertaining from start to finish. Some knowledge of Dicken's works is helpful. I had read them all previous to reading this novel. I expect some knowledge of the work of Wilkie Collins (whose private life is rather complicated for a podgy, aging author) would also have been helpful, but I found the book wonderful in spite of my layman's ignorance of Collins. Highly recommended
  • SARAND
The first book I read of Dan Simmons was The Terror which was about the Franklin Expedition. I liked how he blended factual history with fiction and that made reading the book interesting. There were pretty bad characters in that book but there were very good ones too in particular Francis Crozier who may in fact have been the last man standing (one of the last surviving) in reality.

I picked up Drood because it seemed like it could be another good read blending facts with fiction. I found the book interesting at first and admittedly not knowing anything particular about Dickens and nothing really at all about Wilkie Collins I found I was doing a little side research on them while reading the book. Which can only add to the reading experience. But getting into the middle of this book I found that the teller of the tale was completely dislikable and probably insane. I realized too that there was nothing redeeming about anyone in this book; it was about egotists, drug addicts, drunks, murderers, dog killers, etc. The main characters of Dickens and Collins were thoroughly despicable as portrayed in this book. Now reading a horror book one might expect to have a number, if not many, despicable characters but maybe one would be someone you might identify with and have some redeemable feature about him/her. Well in Drood, at least for me, there none to be found. Albeit this is a long book (and I have read plenty of long books before) I had a hard time finishing it. I found it rather depressing and if I hadn't gotten through more than half of the book I would have stopped reading it all together.

It will be a long time before I am going to read another Dan Simmons novel.

I gave this book two stars mainly because Simmons is a good writer and has good character and story development and with the varied sub character mixes makes for a good read. This book however at least for me I cannot recommend and I wished I had read something else instead.