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Download The Birthdays: A Novel eBook

by Heidi Pitlor

Download The Birthdays: A Novel eBook
ISBN:
0393329933
Author:
Heidi Pitlor
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company (June 17, 2007)
Pages:
368 pages
EPUB book:
1196 kb
FB2 book:
1299 kb
DJVU:
1587 kb
Other formats
azw lit azw rtf
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
653


The Birthdays: A Novel has been added to your Cart. Heidi Pitlor has portrayed her characters perfectly. She has limned them so well that we know about where they will be on Joe's 76th birthday-at least emotionally

The Birthdays: A Novel has been added to your Cart. She has limned them so well that we know about where they will be on Joe's 76th birthday-at least emotionally. Daniel, the eldest, is a recent paraplegic, still coming to terms with his personal tragedy.

The Birthdays a novel Heidi Pitlor In loving memory of my mother, Joan Ruth Pitlor (1941–1984) Contents Title Page Dedication 1 Genetics 2 Dichotomies 3 Land. In loving memory of my mother, Joan Ruth Pitlor (1941–1984).

The birthdays : a novel.

movies All Video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now! Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library. The birthdays : a novel.

On an island off the coast of Maine, the Miller family reunites to celebrate the father's seventy-fifth birthday. Each of the adult children is expecting a first child, and at the same time each is at a major crossroads in life. The eldest, Daniel, still reeling from a car accident that has left him a paraplegic, is also grappling with the fact that his wife had to be artificially inseminated.

He is the only person in The Birthdays who consistently reaches out-to his wife, his children, and even to his box turtle. His birthday becomes an afterthought amid all the familial angst the siblings and their spouses-and one conspicuous lack of a spouse-bring to the table.

She is the author of the novel, The Birthdays. Her second novel, The Daylight Marriage, is forthcoming in May, 2015. Books by Heidi Pitlor. Mor. rivia About The Birthdays.

A page-turning exploration of unexpressed love and unnecessary loss. Riveting and heartbreaking. Written with great emotional and psychological insight, The Birthdays is a journey into the harrowing and redemptive heart of family life

A page-turning exploration of unexpressed love and unnecessary loss. GERALDINE BROOKS, author of Caleb's Crossing She still had time before work. She could go food shopping. She could fold the kids' laundry and get the car washed and return some library books. Or Hannah could do something else. Written with great emotional and psychological insight, The Birthdays is a journey into the harrowing and redemptive heart of family life. This story of marriage and impending parenthood is certain to establish Heidi Pitlor as a rare new voice in fiction.

She wore thick glasses, and her hair sat on her head in a white bowl. You must have the wrong room, Daniel said. You have the wrong room, he repeated in a measured voice, and Brenda added, There’s no Lydia here, ma’am. But the woman made no effort to leave. Weighed down by what once could have been a garden of white carnations and yellow daisies, she appeared not to see or hear the two of them. She opened her mouth but said nothing.

Heidi Pitlor is the author of the novels THE BIRTHDAYS and THE DAYLIGHT MARRIAGE. I'll put on my best Denis Johnson voice and read from this stunning book with authors Mona Awad, Jeff Parker, Stuart Nadler, and Christopher Boucher. Monday, 1/22, 6pm at the Boston Public Library: Celebration of the release of IT OCCURS TO ME THAT I AM AMERICA: New Stories and Art (sales of this anthology benefit the ACLU). This incredible book includes a short story by moi about dogs, race and feminism. Discussion with Ha Jin, Alice Hoffman, and Jonathan Santlofer.

"Captivating, moving, painfully funny, and so very, very true."―Julia Glass

On an island off the coast of Maine, the Miller family reunites to celebrate the father's seventy-fifth birthday. Each of the adult children is expecting a first child, and at the same time each is at a major crossroads in life. The eldest, Daniel, still reeling from a car accident that has left him a paraplegic, is also grappling with the fact that his wife had to be artificially inseminated. Jake, the middle child, discovers that his wife is carrying twins after many trying years of fertility treatments. Hilary - the free-spirited youngest daughter - arrives in Maine five months pregnant with no identifiable father in sight. As the family gathers, something shattering happens from which no one will emerge the same. The Birthdays deftly explores the myriad ways of seeking sustenance after disappointment or loss. Reading group guide included.
  • Forcestalker
Bought as a gift and she said. It was a good book
  • Urtte
I purchased this book to read for a book club that I am in. Another member had chosen it, and I was willing to give it a try. I am a mystery reader and I guess I was disappointed when there was no big event that happened to drag me into the story and keep me interested. Nice family dynamics, but a little slow.
  • Lesesshe
The Miller family is meeting on a Maine barrier island to spend time together while celebrating the seventy-fifth birthday of Joe, the patriarch. There is plenty of excitement as this gathering is the first in four years and the daughter and the two wives of the sons are pregnant each expecting their first child.

However, not all is great in Mudville. Daniel has been wheelchair bound since a cycling accident left him a paraplegic; he is unable to cope with the fact that his spouse had to be artificially inseminated with the sperm of some Midwestern hunk instead of by him. In spite of being the most successful of the siblings, at least financially, Jake feels inferior; his wife is carrying twins following fertility treatment and he has lost all interest in her as a person especially as his sex partner. Hilary has no idea who the father of the fetus she carries might be and does not care.

This is a terrific family drama starring a strong ensemble cast in which the seven key players bring differing personalities to the table as they each discuss parenthood, their trepidations, and their lives. The key to this powerful tale is that Heidi Pitlor insures each individual has a unique personality that remains consistent throughout the beguiling plot. Fans who enjoy a deep look at relationships including how children radically change the interactions of their parents will want to read Ms. Pitlor's strong novel.

Harriet Klausner
  • Little Devil
I almost put it down after the first two chapters. I tried to like it--several other women had recommended it to me, and I didn't want to go back to them and say that I hadn't finished it. I won't recommend it to anyone else.

Has this writer never heard of the most famous adage in fiction, "show, don't tell"? If you have to belabor a point, or constantly tell the reader the backstory in lengthy paragraphs that go nowhere, then you aren't doing your job as a writer.

The reader should be able to infer from a well-crafted work what you haven't told them.

The dialogue is stilted and the "epiphanies" aren't.

Many book clubs have chosen this one for their members, and its reputation appears to be growing. I don't quite understand how.

This reads like a first effort, from someone who was published well before they were ready. It's not horrible, but it's not praiseworthy in my opinion, either.
  • Yalone
In a family reunion filled with unexpected events and revelations, The Birthdays proves not only that you can't go home again, but that everyone carries their own interpretations of family history. It is Joe Miller's seventy-fifth birthday and his children, Daniel, Jake and Hilary and their spouses are meeting at Jake's vacation home in Great Salt, Maine, for the celebration, a real occasion for a family that has not seen each other for a while and will soon be changed by the pregnancies of two daughters-in-law, Brenda and Liz, wives of Daniel and Jake, respectively. By next year the family will have grown exponentially, a fact anticipated by all. Much to everyone's surprise, thirty-five-year old, unmarried Hilary is also pregnant, adding another dramatic layer to the story.

Following the travels of each married couple on the way to Great Salt, including Joe and his wife, Ellen, it is clear that married life is complicated at best, the recent pregnancies only adding to the issues. Daniels' life has undergone the most challenges: he became a paraplegic in an auto accident a year and a half earlier, their child a product scientific intervention. Still adapting to his drastically altered body, Daniel is plagued with self-doubts, thrown into ill-humor and confusion by Brenda's increasing hormonal discontents. Although the brothers don't agree on much, Jake is reacting as well to his wife's incipient motherhood, IVF the method that has finally given the couple their dream of parenthood. But Jake is excessively needy, emotionally sensitive and increasingly irritating to his perfectionist wife. In contrast, Hilary is the consummate rebel, refusing to name the child's father, her life plans changing as opportunities arise.

Regardless of the years that have passed, the three fractious siblings interact much the same as when they were children. Never having given much thought to their parents, Daniel, Jake and Hilary only now consider the nature of that relationship, Joe's ageing and Ellen's secrets. A dramatic turn forces the Millers to face uncomfortable truths about themselves, as well as the shock of life on life's terms. Gathered together for this celebration turned somber by events, children, spouses and parents realize that nothing can be controlled and that petty resentments are best laid to rest. While none of these characters is particularly appealing, each displays the familiar traits of family, the small agonies of competition, failures of communication and snap judgments that create distance. It is only through forgiveness and acceptance that the Millers are able to forge ahead, united against the world in support of one another. Luan Gaines/ 2006.
  • Simple
I love a good family drama, and this book delivers. Heidi Pitlor does an amazing job of illuminating, in simple, elegant prose, the complex web of relationships between the siblings and parents who reunite in this story. The three very different pregnancies of the women in the book force the characters to confront their fears and failings, their hopes, and their feelings about each other in a way that is poignant and very satisfying for the reader. I look forward to reading whatever Ms Pitlor writes next.
  • Danial
This book tells the story of how a family really is. Nothing is glossed over, there is no hidden meaning. For the time it took me to read this book, I was engulfed in the Miller family. I was saddened by all that they had to deal with, happy with the promise of a bright future and proud of thier love for one another even if they, at times, did not want to admit it to themselves. Heidi Pitlor has written one hell of a good first novel. She's obviously a talented writer and I look forward to more from her