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by Joe R. Lansdale

Download The Bottoms eBook
ISBN:
189228460X
Author:
Joe R. Lansdale
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Subterranean; Signed edition (May 1, 2000)
EPUB book:
1754 kb
FB2 book:
1333 kb
DJVU:
1465 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
703


The Bottoms is an Edgar Award-winning suspense novel by American author Joe R. Lansdale. This story takes place during the Great Depression in East Texas.

The Bottoms is an Edgar Award-winning suspense novel by American author Joe R. Young Harry Crane discovers the mutilated body of a black woman that sets off a mystery involving rising violence and racism. Despite the efforts of law enforcement, the killing continues. Harry and his younger sister, Thomasina, fix their suspicions on a local horror legend, The Goat Man, who lives deep in the Big Thicket

Published in the United States by Vintage Book a division of Random House, In. New York, and in Canada by Random House of Canada Limited, Toronto

Joe R. Lansdale is the author of more than a dozen novels, including Sunset and Sawdust, Lost Echoes, Leather Maiden, and Vanilla Ride. The Bottoms and Mucho Mojo were New York Times notable books. Published in the United States by Vintage Book a division of Random House, In. New York, and in Canada by Random House of Canada Limited, Toronto. Originally published in hardcover in the United States by the Mysterious Press, a division of Warner Books, In. New York, in 2000.

It was said the Goat Man didn’t get out of the woods that made up the Sabine bottoms. High land was something he couldn’t tolerate. He needed the damp, thick leaf mush beneath his feet, which were hooves.

Joe R. Lansdale is the author of over thirty novels and numerous short stories. His work has appeared in national anthologies, magazines, and collections, as well as numerous foreign publications. He has written for comics, television, film, newspapers, and Internet sites. It has similar characters (Goat Man is Boo Radley) and the same plot lines about racism, lynchings and the South during the Depression. The narrator is a male instead of a female, who has a tomboy sister named Tom.

Joe Richard Lansdale (born October 28, 1951) is an American writer and martial arts instructor. Lansdale grew up in East Texas, the son of a mechanic

Joe Richard Lansdale (born October 28, 1951) is an American writer and martial arts instructor. Lansdale grew up in East Texas, the son of a mechanic. He has written novels and stories in various genres, including Western, horror, science fiction, mystery, and suspense. He has also written for comics as well as Batman: The Animated Series. He has written 45 novels and published 30 short story collections along with many chapbooks and comic book adaptations

Joe R. Lansdale’s most popular book is The Bottoms. Showing 30 distinct works. previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9.

The Bottoms by Joe Lansdale takes place in 1930s East Texas. Joe R. Narrated by the elderly Harry Collins, The Bottoms blends mystery, thriller, horror, and the best of literary fiction into a compelling.

There weren’t any new magazines I wanted to read, so after I had swept up the cut hair, Daddy gave me a couple pennies and sent me on my way.

ng at bolts of colored cloth, mule harnesses, and all manner of dry and soft goods, geegaws and the like. It came down to a Dr Pepper out of the ice barrel, or peppermint sticks. I finally zeroed in on the peppermint sticks. My two cents bought four. The storekeeper, Mr. Groon, bald, pink-faced, and generous, winked, gave me six sticks, wrapped them and put them in a sack.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. The Bottoms (Vintage Crime Black Lizard Original). 337 Kb. Devil Red (Hap and Leonard).

Edition limited to 400 copies, of which this is numbered 2. Sub Press went all out for this edition. Their publications always achieve the highest of marks, but this is an exceptionally well produced edition. The book itself feels solid and substantial. Satin ribbon marker in original position. Full-color dust jacket, endpapers, limitation page and several full-page illustrations by Alan M. Clark. This edition PRE-dates the trade edition, and is set from the author's original manuscript, which slightly differs from the final edition published to the general public.
  • Paster
There is a good reason "The Bottoms" won the 2001 Edgar Award for BEST NOVEL. This is a book that takes you to a specific time and place and makes you taste it.

That time & place is 1933 East Texas. Way East Texas, on the border with Louisiana and not that far from the Gulf. The Dust Bowl is shaping North/West Texas*, but in East Texas it's wetter. But there is still the 3 year-old Great Depression. On the other hand, times were never flush in The Bottoms, the lands close to the lazy Sabine River.

The narrator is Harry Collins, now an old man confined to a wheel chair. But the tale he tells is of his 1933 12 year-old self. And how he tells it! Jim Crow is like a character in "The Bottoms". Always there. Menacing. Every action Harry's father, the part-time constable, takes has to be weighed with Jim Crow's reaction in mind, as if the institutional racism is a single powerful person.

When Harry and his sister Tom(asina) find the body of a black woman trussed in barbed wire and stashed at the river's edge as if it were a dessert in a larder, their father has to look into it. He can't take the body to the local doctor/coroner, because even if the doctor was inclined to work on a black, he would lose his white clientele. So the body is carted to a nearby settlement mostly black, where a black doctor performs the post mortem in an ice house. As it turns out, the local preacher can identify the woman, too. All this effort gets Constable Collins only more questions and a warning from the sheriff.

Then there's another body, similarly tortured, and Harry's father has the novel notion that even if a serial killer only goes after blacks, it should be investigated, And this gets Constable Collins a visit from the Klan. But don't get me wrong, Harry's father, even when seen through the eyes of his 12 year-old son, is not Rambo or even the Lone Ranger. He is a decent man trying to do his decent best.

And he and his wife are raising their kids to be the same way. I would say that as I was reading this book, my feeling was one of expectant fear, simmering. Here's Harry about to make a gruesome discovery: "I felt something in the air I can't explain. Maybe it was just the car that had set me on edge, but it was as if the night were filled with needles and the cool points of them were sticking in my skin." That's how I felt while reading "The Bottoms".

As a mystery, the plotting of "The Bottoms" is pretty good. You are given clues but they are very subtle - I certainly didn't catch on. My personal taste runs to murderers who are driven by something other than madness, but my immersion in the world of Harry Collins was so complete that I can highly recommend it as a mystery and as a mystery approaching literature.

Given it's time and place, the language used is realistic. Though not gratuitous, the n-word is used in casual conversation.

If you're interested (I had to look it up) the Sabine River is pronounced seh bin.

* I do want to note that Lansdale only brings up the Dustbowl and the Depression as background. And good thing. The story takes place in 1933, so the Depression was very real, though hardly getting started. But the first wave of the Dust Bowl's three droughts didn't happen until 1934. This nitpicking fact did not affect my enjoyment of this fascinating novel.

Happy Reader
  • Kegal
Lansdale always plays the race card. The good guys are all these people who are politically correct in every way and never had a racist bone in their body. The bad guys, of course, are dirty rotten evil racists who are always responsible for the horrible crimes in Joe's books. The characters are just stick characters -- either politically correct angels or racist devils. The book won the Edgar award, which is why I read it, but I sure got tired of being lectured to. I just read his latest book, Jackrabbit Smile, and predictably, one of his protagonists is a black, gay man who is constantly put down for both attributes. I think the less we talk about race and just get on with our lives, the better off we'll all be. I know many disagree, and that's okay. But no more Joe Lansdale for me.
  • Tamesya
I know of no other writer who can make a reader so happy, so disgusted, and so sad all in the same book. He describes gritty situations and discusses gritty issues, always true to his convictions. With a terrific eye for detail, Landsdale can create mental pictures that are vivid and true that will stay in the reader's mind forever, and his ear for accent is true. Besides being a mystery and a historical tale of justice, The Bottoms is a real coming of age story with no sentimentality or nonsense. Not for the faint of heart (and Lansdale never is.), this is one heckova book!
  • lets go baby
A reviewer said The Bottoms echoed Harper Lee. The Bottoms doesn’t echo To Kill A Mockingbird; it is almost a copy of that famous book, although less academic and a quicker read. It has similar characters (Goat Man is Boo Radley) and the same plot lines about racism, lynchings and the South during the Depression. The narrator is a male instead of a female, who has a tomboy sister named Tom. It is a bit racier in its descriptions of the female body and rape. To be honest, the last chapters are much more tense than TKAMB.
  • Nirn
I usually don't post positive reviews for items that already have a plethora of positive reviews, but this book made such a great impression on me that I have to add my two cents worth. The genius of Joe Lansdale is his ability to develop intense descriptions of the characters in the novel, such that you end up really caring about what happens to them in the course of events. He also has a gift for developing the stark reality of the time in which the book is set, in this case that being depression-era east Texas, where life was onerous and even dangerous if you were not a white person. I just finished Lansdale's "The Thicket" and considered it to be one of the best novels I have ever read. "The Bottoms" is a close second.
  • Binthars
Characterized by a colorful narrator with vivid imagery, I greatly enjoyed this novel. The view of race relations of the period (mid-1930s) in the deep south, was perhaps simplistic. The father strikes me as exceptionally open minded. The overall characterization was excellent, though the self justifications of the murderer near the end rang hollow to me.