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by Ramsey Campbell

Download Solomon Kane eBook
ISBN:
184856726X
Author:
Ramsey Campbell
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Titan Books; 1 edition (June 28, 2011)
EPUB book:
1452 kb
FB2 book:
1132 kb
DJVU:
1119 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
980


Solomon kane the official movie novelisation a novel by ramsey campbell based on the screenplay written by michael j. bassett based on the character created b. .

Solomon kane the official movie novelisation a novel by ramsey campbell based on the screenplay written by michael j. bassett based on the character created by robert . The official movie novelisation. A novel by. Ramsey campbell. Based on the screenplay written by. Michael j. bassett. Based on the character created by. Robert e. howard. Solomon Kane: The Official Movie Novelisation. Published by. Titan Books.

Ramsey Campbell has completed Howard's three sizable fragments, and several compilations contain some of.

Ramsey Campbell has completed Howard's three sizable fragments, and several compilations contain some of these collaborations. ISBN 0-671-87695-3) in which Campbell's continuation and completion of Howard's fragments are printed do not delineate the exact spot at which the author changes.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Solomon Kane is a sixteenth century anti-hero created by renowned sword and sorcery author Robert E Howard (creator of Conan the Barbarian ). When Solomon Kane meets the Devil's Reaper.

The man lay half crouched on a bed of filthy straw in one dim corner.

The man lay half crouched on a bed of filthy straw in one dim corner s nothing else in the cell. A hole in the floor served as a privy. The man’s face was turned to the wall as if he could not bear the stench from the hole or the sight of his situation, but Kane made out that he was old and frail. The strands of unkempt hair that trailed over the shoulders of his ragged shirt were every colour of tarnished gold.

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While their efforts were not negligible, none of their books still live

While their efforts were not negligible, none of their books still live. Now, esteemed horror writer Ramsey Campbell – heir of M. R. James and Robert Aickman – has had a go. And it’s not just the book of the film – it’s the book of the film of the book. Michael Bassett’s film adaptation of Robert E. Howard’s ‘Solomon Kane’ was a good dark fantasy, not particularly faithful to Howard’s puritan-pulp stories, but enjoyable of its kind.

Solomon Kane: The Official Movie Novelisation. Alone with the Horrors: The Great Short Fiction of Ramsey Campbell 1961-1991.

Solomon Kane by Ramsey Campbell (Paperback, 2010). Ramsey Campbell has won multiple British Fantasy and World Fantasy Awards and several Bram Stoker and International Horror Guild Awards

Solomon Kane by Ramsey Campbell (Paperback, 2010). Ramsey Campbell has won multiple British Fantasy and World Fantasy Awards and several Bram Stoker and International Horror Guild Awards. He is the author of such classic works of horror and dark fantasy as Obsession, The Face Must Die, The Nameless, Incarnate and The Influence, and more recently The Darkest Part of the Woods, The Overnight and The Grin of the Dark.

Solomon Kane is a sixteenth century anti-hero created by rewned sword and sorcery author Robert E Howard (creator of Conan the Barbarian ). When Solomon Kane meets the Devil's Reaper, he postpones his fate by reuncing violence - a vow that is soon tested by the forces of evil. Compelled to once again strap on his weapons, he embarks on an epic journey of redemption. Titan Books Ltd. ISBN-10.

When Solomon Kane meets the Devil's Reaper, he postpones his fate by renouncing violence – a vow that is soon tested by the . Compelled to once again strap on his weapons, Kane embarks on an epic journey of redemption.

When Solomon Kane meets the Devil's Reaper, he postpones his fate by renouncing violence – a vow that is soon tested by the forces of evil. The official novelisation of the remarkable movie, written and directed by Michael J. Bassett and starring James Purefoy as Solomon Kane. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Solomon Kane is a sixteenth century anti-hero created by renowned sword and sorcery author Robert E Howard (creator of Conan the Barbarian). When Solomon Kane meets the Devil's Reaper, he postpones his fate by renouncing violence - a vow that is soon tested by the forces of evil. Compelled to once again strap on his weapons, he embarks on an epic journey of redemption.
  • Zamo
This novelization should be required reading for all fans of the Solomon Kane movie. The author has done a fabulous job. Many scenes in the movie have been expanded, with interesting background content.
  • Captain America
I saw the movie first on TV, then ordered the book. The book reminded me so much of the Robert E. Howard adventures I read as a young man. It bought back many happy memories. This book is definitely true to Howard's style, and an excellent read. I finished this book in one read.
  • Mullador
An excellent adventure which compliments the books series I have on the character. I just ordered the movie and I am looking forward to seeing James Purefoy play the character.
  • Xellerlu
Watch the movie, its 50 times better and won't take as long to get thru
  • Ballagar
Solomon Kane by Ramsey Campbell, based on the screenplay by Michael J. Bassett and the character created by Robert E. Howard (2011): Based on a well-regarded movie that I haven't seen yet, Solomon Kane gives Conan creator Robert E. Howard's 17th-century Puritan ghost-and-demon-buster an actual origin story.

Featured in about a dozen stories, poems and fragments from the early 1930's, Solomon Kane predates Conan by a few years. Robert E. Howard created a LOT of heroes during his short, prolific life. Unlike many of those heroes, Kane moves within an actual historical context. His adventures take place in the 16th and 17th centuries, though many of them are in an Africa as fanciful as any of the wholly fictional lands of Conan.

Campbell finished up several Kane fragments for publication in the 1970's, there demonstrating an ability to approximate Howard's prose style without sliding into parody. He does the same here. His Kane is a brooding, haunted hero, and the environment is bloody and filled with the violence of men and supernatural beings. Campbell nicely echoes Howard's occasionally wonky diction (there's a stretch involving the repeated use of the word 'supine' that almost does slide into parody) and seriousness of purpose.

The novel is fun, but it's not funny or light-hearted or campy, though Campbell does seem to get stuck with what seem to be a couple of campy, Bondian missteps from the original screenplay. The worst of these comes when a necromancer says 'How do you like what I've done to the place?' to Kane as Kane regards with horror what the necromancer has done to his ancestral home. Augh! This is what Michael Moorcock and James Cawthorn flagged as "deadly jolite" in their study of fantasy, Wizardry and Wild Romance, a terrible linguistic bleedover from the Bond films.

Overall, though, this is one of the ten best non-Howard, Howard novels I've read. Ramsey Campbell deserves praise for sublimating his own peculiar style and thematic concerns to the service of telling a fairly straightforward sword-and-sorcery novel in the Howard tradition. And screenwriter Bassett does, for the most part, lay out a plausible background for this Renaissance Man, whose greatest Howard moment (in my eyes) came when he physically beat the crap out of a ghost. Recommended.
  • Ghordana
Those people who are looking for a 'lost' Solomon Kane novel by Robert Howard, will be disappointed - Ramsey Campbell is no Howard, which is not always a bad thing. Besides, I don't particularly want more pastiche. Similarly those expecting the moody character development, slow pacing and paranoia of a normal Campbell book will be disappointed.

What you do get is a good, well paced, action horror novel. While I was reading this book I also read Robert McCammon's "i travel by night', which has been getting great reviews. Campbell slaughters McCammon both in terms of character, action, suspense and horror, which surprised me.

What i would like to hope for is that Campbell feels moved to tell more stories of Solomon Kane and develop his ideas independently of a movie script into some place that is truly unique, a homage to the original but with new perspectives.

All in all, definately worth a read if you like Solomon Kane or Ramsey Campbell, just don't be too definate in what you expect.
  • Tat
Since writing the introduction to Baen Publishing's 1995 release of the Robert E Howard collection of short stories entitled 'Solomon Kane', Campbell has been recognized as something of a Kane expert and one of the characters biggest fans. So when Ramsey Campbell, described by the Oxford Companion To English Literature as "Britain's Most Respected Living Horror Writer", decided to write a full-length novel in honor of the immortal Robert E Howard heroic character, there was some excited anticipation amongst Howard fans. And since 'Solomon Kane' is also a novelization of the limited released 2009 movie (a movie I haven't seen yet), fans could hope that, finally, one of Robert E Howard's characters would make it on to the big screen in a form they could recognize (Since the two 'Conan' movies and the 'Kull The Conqueror' were so departed from the original Howard story lines as to be practically unrecognizable).

The novelization, while it has some strong story points, respectable writing, and entertaining action sequences, falls far short in two important respects. First, it expands the Solomon Kane character in an unusual direction. Second, this "new and improved" Kane fails to connect with the reader emotionally.

The change in direction is apparent as soon as one reads the back cover, where Kane is described as Howard's "sixteenth-century anti-hero." Solomon Kane was frequently described by Howard as "dark", "dour" and "somber" in his prose, and described by Howard as "A true fanatic... his promptings were reasons enough for his actions," and "was not wholly a puritan, though he thought of himself as such." Campbell himself described Solomon Kane as Howard's "Puritan Hero" in the aforementioned introduction. But the definition of an Anti-Hero is "A protagonist who lacks the attributes that make a heroic figure." Kane is not an anti-hero.

Campbell begins his novel at a point in Kane's life sometime after he left his fathers castle and before Howard begins to write about him. Kane at this point, according to Campbell, is a man driven by violence and rage, a person who fights for the sheer joy of fighting and killing and winning, a ruthless monster willing to throw away the lives of his own men if it will get him closer to his goals. He is a despicable man, not an Anti-Hero, and the reader has no sympathy for him. Kanes critical moment of change comes when he is confronted by a darkness greater than he is, and is told by that darkness that Kanes path leads straight to hell. So, faced with a foe he cannot beat, Kane escapes, forswears violence, and retreats to a monastery. In other words, Kane changes his ways not because of any guilt or the discovery of higher ideals (though these do come later), but out of fear for himself. While this probably makes Kane a true anti-hero, it does not make him the character that Howard created. Ultimately, Campbell's attempt to expand the story of Solomon Kane fails to make the reader really care about him in the first place.

The book also has pacing problems. We don't see Kane as an attractive, humanizing figure at first. Nor are we allowed to experience the emotional or spiritual depths of his conversion, so we never get the chance to experience empathy with him. So the first 50 pages drag slowly by as we wait for something more interesting happen. Kanes encounter with a family of traveling Puritans is, finally, a nice touch and makes him more interesting and available to the reader. Then there is an attack, a chase, loss, a predictable period of remorse, then, FINALLY!, some well choreographed and dramatized battle scenes that, I imagine, would have made Howard proud.

Expanding on a popular but ultimately two dimensional character is always a difficult challenge. But Ramsey Campbell should have taken some clues from people like Robert Jordan who successfully broke open Howard's "Conan" character when he took Conan from short-story icon to full-length novel hero. Campbell should have also accepted his own analysis of Kane - that Kane is a puritan hero well -suited for the violent and bloody sixteenth-century. He had, after all, the blood and fury of Conan coursing through his veins. Kane was able to focus it in the service of ideals greater than himself, while narrowly avoiding the pitfalls of pride and ego. He was the champion of the powerless and downtrodden, going wherever God did send him. And while we might wonder what would have happened if Kane hadn't had the examples of the Spanish Inquisition and the British Crown as examples of despotism masquerading as holiness, the fact is he did know the difference between good and evil, and stayed on the side of good. If Campbell had taken more time to make us feel Kane's personal story and his personal struggles, maybe we could accept this new take on Solomon Kane. As it turns out, however, this book is just another writer, however talented, who can't write Howard as well as he thinks he can.