almediah.fr
» » Pears on a Willow Tree

Download Pears on a Willow Tree eBook

by Leslie Pietrzyk

Download Pears on a Willow Tree eBook
ISBN:
0380799103
Author:
Leslie Pietrzyk
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harper Perennial; 1st Edition. edition (July 1, 1999)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1862 kb
FB2 book:
1197 kb
DJVU:
1669 kb
Other formats
mbr doc docx rtf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
181


Leslie Pietrzyk is the author of Pears on a Willow Tree. She lives in Alexandria, Virginia.

Only 14 left in stock (more on the way). Leslie Pietrzyk is the author of Pears on a Willow Tree.

Leslie Pietrzyk's Pears on a Willow Tree starts with a recipe for pierogi and ends with one for poppy-seed cake. It is the girls who keep the family alive," Rose writes to her Polish mother; but it is also true that, as she later tells her great-granddaughter, "It's impossible for a good daughter to leave; it's impossible for a good daughter to stay.

Pears on a Willow Tree is a multigenerational roadmap of love and hate, distance and closeness, and the lure of roots that both bind and sustain us al. he Marchewka women are inseparable

Pears on a Willow Tree is a multigenerational roadmap of love and hate, distance and closeness, and the lure of roots that both bind and sustain us al. he Marchewka women are inseparable. They relish the joys of family gatherings; from preparing traditional holiday meals to organizing a wedding in which each of them is given a specific task - whether it's sewing the bridal gown or preserving pickles as a gift to the newlyweds.

I didn't want to stop reading this book once I had started. I found the story of four generations of women in a Polish-American family very moving and totally absorbing. Find similar books Profile. We were running around all the time, and I wore your apron over my bathing suit in the kitchen, and you braided the four pieces of dough. There was a trick, you said, a special way so that the four pieces came out even. You brushed egg on the top and I started to sprinkle seeds, but you grabbed a handful and said, 'Never skimp on poppy seeds - more!'

Pears on a willow tree. by. Pietrzyk, Leslie.

Pears on a willow tree.

Leslie Pietrzyk is an American author who has three traditionally published novels, Pears on a Willow Tree, A Year and a Day, and Silver Girl

Leslie Pietrzyk is an American author who has three traditionally published novels, Pears on a Willow Tree, A Year and a Day, and Silver Girl. Her historical novel, Reversing the River, set in Chicago on the first day of 1900, was serialized on the literary app, Great Jones Street. Her short story collection, This Angel on My Chest. won the 2015 Drue Heinz Literature Prize.

Pears on a Willow Tree book.

Forthcoming novel: SIVER GIRL, published by Unnamed Press in February 2018. Just beginning to read Pears on a Willow Tree and looking forward to the journey! Leslie Pietrzyk. 30 November 2018 at 10:58. This book brought back so many of my childhood memories of learning from my Polish. I loved this book for that reason because my Polish mother passed away when I was 6 and my new stepmother a few years later would not allow any contact. I devoured this book! It was like a trip back in time. I forgot all about the traditional Christmas meal and the strict Catholic core. I can't say enough about this book.

Pears on a Willow Tree is a multigenerational roadmap of love and hate, distance and closeness, and the lure of roots that both bind and sustain us all.

The Marchewka women are inseparable. They relish the joys of family gatherings; from preparing traditional holiday meals to organizing a wedding in which each of them is given a specific task -- whether it's sewing the bridal gown or preserving pickles as a gift to the newlyweds. Bound together by recipes, reminiscences and tangled relationships, these women are the foundation of a dignified, compassionate family--one that has learned to survive the hardships of emigration and assimilation in twentieth-century America.

But as the century evolves, so does each succeeding generation. As the older women keep a tight hold on the family traditions passed from mother to daughter, the younger women are dealing with more modern problems, wounds not easily healed by the advice of a local priest or a kind word from mother.

Amy is separated by four generations from her great-grandmother Rose, who emigrated from Poland. Rose's daughter Helen adjusted to the family's new home in a way her mother never could, while at the same time accepting the importance of Old Country ways. But Helen's daughter Ginger finds herself suffocating within the close-knit family, the first Marchewka woman to leave Detroit for the adventure of life beyond the reach of her mother and grandmother.

It's in the American West that Giner raises her daughter Amy, uprooted from the safety of kitchens perfuned by the aroma of freshly baked poppy seed cake and pierogi made by hand by generations of women. But Amy is about to realize that there may be room in her heart for both the Old World and the New.

  • Jerinovir
The stories concern the grandmothers, mothers, aunts, daughters, sisters and cousins from the same family. The conflicts, the hurt feelings and the lack of interest that some of the younger women have in their ethnic background is painful to the older women who want their daughters to keep up the old traditions.

Food is a large part of the heritage, and the working together to make the large meals is important to the mothers. The younger women want their own identify. Ginger, who is one of the main characters, left home as soon as she could after finishing school, but returns to her chilhood home with her children every Christmas. She complains and dislikes the old traditional ways, but she still comes home year after year. Her mother, Helen tries to understand Ginger, but is constantly hurt by her daughter. Amy, who is Ginger's daughter also struggles to understand her mother.

The book is interesting and, although not in chronological order, it covers the years from 1919 to 1989.
  • avanger
Having grown up in a Polish neighborhood on Chicago's South Side with a grandma (bushia)who emigrated from the "old country", this book was like a stroll down memory lane. Grandma filled out stomachs with perogi, kluski, and kelbasa, our heads with captivating stories and our lives with unforgetable customs and rituals.

Pears on a Willow Tree is the story of four generations of Marchewka women: (mothers and daughters)Rose, Helen, Ginger and Amy....some of them seeking to assimilate yet preserve the past and it's traditions while others fight to supress and escape from those same traditions. Ultimately all of these women are trying to find that "impossible pear".

Believe me, you don't have to be Polish to love this book!
  • Ballagar
I just did not enjoy this book at all. While the characters spoke to me and I wanted to know more about them, I felt the author tried too hard to make it all about the flowery descriptions.
  • Shadowbourne
I learned a great deal from reading the book. It dwells on the lives of four generations of Polish women in America, not a topic I was even vaguely aware of. Pietrzyk has disproved Earnest Hemingway's view that a successful novel should include romance, war, and religion. Her novel is informative and enjoyable without touching on any of the elements we've come to expect.
Review from Marlon Fick
  • Tegore
When I was born, I was the fifth generation daughter in the US. My family emigrated from Eastern Europe around WW2 and I was the second generation born here. I could not believe how much this story moved me. I know these women - I am these women. We read this for my book club and I purchased the books from my other club members to send to my mother, aunt, and two cousins. I hope they see what I saw! If you wonder where you came from, where you are going and why you are/aren't like your mom, grandmother, great grandmother... this book may move you also. I would give it ten stars if I could.
Thank you - Leslie!
  • Kazimi
For some reason I could not get into this book. May try it again at a later date
  • Nahn
I put it on the side. Haven't finished.
I don't know what all the raves are about. There are some things in the books that are interesting. I could relate to the places because I grew up in the Detroit area. I could relate to some of the polish traditions. Overall, though, I think it's hard to follow all the characters and while the older characters seem to have, well, strong characters, the young one who went to Thailand seems to have no character really. So she went to teach in Thailand - so what. With the other characters, you sense their commitment to their lives, however their lives turned out. Also, the element that is missing too is that if you were Polish in Detroit in most of the generations covered, there was a strong church connection that the book hints at but doesn't really get into. Life would have revolved around church as much as around the food and traditions and they were strongly interwoven. I would actually recommend another book over this one - Hamtramck Haunts - which is a woman's memoirs of her Polish family history and upbringing.