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Download BioShock: Rapture eBook

by John Shirley

Download BioShock: Rapture eBook
ISBN:
0765324849
Author:
John Shirley
Category:
Genre Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tor Books (July 19, 2011)
Pages:
432 pages
EPUB book:
1269 kb
FB2 book:
1481 kb
DJVU:
1252 kb
Other formats
mobi lit lrf doc
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
965


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. John Shirley won the Bram Stoker Award for his book Black Butterflies. He was co-screenwriter of The Crow and television writer for Fox, and Paramount Television.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The prequel story to the award-winning and bestselling video game franchise. How the majesty of Rapture. His novels include City Come A-Walkin', Eclipse, Crawlers, Demons, and Bleak History.

Dedicated to the fans of BioShock and BioShock 2 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Thanks to Eric Raab and Paula Guran. A city where the artist would not fear the censor. Where the scientist would not be bound by Petty morality

Dedicated to the fans of BioShock and BioShock 2 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Thanks to Eric Raab and Paula Guran. Where the scientist would not be bound by Petty morality. Where the great would not be constrained by the small. And with the sweat of your brow, Rapture can become your city as well. Andrew Ryan in BioShock. Imagine if you could be smarter, stronger, healthier.

John Shirley BIOSHOCK: RUPTURE Dedicated to the fans of BioShock and BioShock 2 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Thanks to Eric Raab and Paula Guran. Читать онлайн BioShock: Rapture. Special thanks to everyone who put up with my bitching. EPIGRAPHS I am Andrew Ryan and I’m here to ask you a question: Is a man not entitled to the sweat of his own brow? No, says the man in Washington. Dedicated to the fans of BioShock and BioShock 2. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. Thanks to Eric Raab and Paula Guran.

Shirley John BioShock: Rapture - читать книгу онлайн бесплатно. PART ONE The First Age of Rapture. 2. 1. Park Avenue, New York City 1946.

Author: John Shirley. Publisher: Tor, New York, 2011. The bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has brought a fear of total annihilation. The rise of secret government agencies and sanctions on business has many watching their backs. America’s sense of freedom is diminishin. nd many are desperate to take that freedom back. Among them is a great dreamer, an immigrant who pulled himself from the depths of poverty to become one of the wealthiest and admired men in the world. That man is Andrew Ryan, and he believed that great men and women deserve better.

John Shirley won the Bram Stoker Award for his book Black Butterflies.

BioShock: Rapture is a science-fiction novel set in the eponymous BioShock universe and was released on July 19th, 2011. It was written by John Shirley, and published by Tor Books in the . and Titan Books in the United Kingdom. Its story covers events from the creation of Rapture until a point before the first game starts. Both familiar and lesser-known characters from the BioShock universe are expanded upon in the story, as well as locations like Apollo Square and Point Prometheus.

It's the end of World War II. FDR's New Deal has redefined American politics. Taxes are at an all-time high. The bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has brought a fear of total annihilation. The rise of secret government agencies and sanctions on business has many watching their backs. America's sense of freedom is diminishing . . . and many are desperate to take that freedom back.

Among them is a great dreamer, an immigrant who pulled himself from the depths of poverty to become one of the wealthiest and admired men in the world. That man is Andrew Ryan, and he believed that great men and women deserve better. And so he set out to create the impossible, a utopia free from government, censorship, and moral restrictions on science--where what you give is what you get. He created Rapture---the shining city below the sea.

But as we all know, this utopia suffered a great tragedy. This is the story of how it all came to be . . .and how it all ended.

  • Azago
"Bioshock: Rapture" is a 2011 novel by John Shirley, and is the prequel to the videogames Bioshock (2007) and Bioshock 2 (2010). While the novel can stand alone on its own, it is recommended that the reader play through Bioshock 1 and 2 before reading the novel, as it is more effective as a whole if read after having played the games.

"Bioshock: Rapture" is set in 1945 and continues through the 50's. In it, we find a world changed by the recently fought Second World War and FDR's New Deal. Red communism is on the rise and the world is paranoid about possible nuclear war. Having escaped Communist Russia and come to America, only to find the U.S. aggressively adopting progressive policy, rich business tycoon Andrew Ryan is determined to find a place where business, science and art can flourish in an unchecked environment. Ryan is frustrated that the fruit of man's labor is taken from him by the state or by religion, and believes he can create an insular society free from the influence of the rest of the world, where freedom is the name of the game. What follows is a three-part tale that chronicles the creation of Ryan's utopia, and its eventual descent into madness. By the end of the story, the scene is set for the beginning of the Bioshock 1 videogame.

The plot of "Rapture" is incredibly interesting. It is a genius blend of both Ayn Rand and George Orwell; readers of those authors will immediately see similarities in "Rapture." However, while obviously inspired by these two visionary writers, "Rapture" does not feel ripped off, but rather comes across as an inspired reimagining of the ideas from Rand and Orwell. The plot moves through the years pretty quickly, and is always engaging. The reader should not expect a lot of violence or action in the first 2/3 of the book, but should expect an interesting blend of philosophy, intrigue, science and drama. In the last third of the book, chaos descends.

Mr. Shirley, the author, does an excellent job with the novel. The writing is top-notch, with references and dialogue that feel genuine to the 40's/50's setting. Vocabulary and colloquialisms are masterfully used, and really help catapult the novel to something transcending mere video game novelization. The characters are also brilliantly rendered, particularly Ryan, Lamb, Fontaine, Bill, Cohen, and others. So many of the characters Ryan brings on his grand experiment are eccentric, and Shirley does a bang-up job of highlighting those quirks, and spends enough time with each character that the reader really gets to know them. The reader will form a real emotional attachment with the more likable characters. The ending is handled masterfully, with both a sense of conclusion and a sense of mystery.

Those who have played the Bioshock games will notice how well the novel answers questions raised in the plot of the games. I was thoroughly confused by the plot of the first Bioshock game, but the novel really helped clear up the misunderstanding. The only plot element that was still hazy to me after reading the novel is what exactly ADAM and EVE are. We know what these two elements allow the user to do, but the science of the matter was glossed over. This small complaint was one of the only I had with the novel.

"Bioshock: Rapture" comes highly recommended, and is one of the best pieces of tie-in fiction I have read. Do yourself a favor and check it out, particularly if you are a fan of the games. Your experience will not be complete until you've read the timeless and tragic story behind the rise and fall of Andrew Ryan's shining city under the sea, Rapture.

In Summation:

The Good:
-clarifies the plot of the games and ties in masterfully with them
-great characterization
-outstanding writing style and use of dialogue
-effective ending for a prequel
-an example of what media tie-ins should be

The Bad:
-still fuzzy on exactly what ADAM and EVE are
  • misery
This is a FANTASTIC book.
Its a prequel but do NOT read it until you play both the first and second game (Infinite had not yet been made and isn't included, and really not necessary.)
It adds so much depth to the game. It takes obscure characters and sort of mentioned storylines from the game and develops them. It mostly follows one man's journey from meeting Andrew Ryan through building Rapture, right up to the beginning of the first game. You read the audiodiaries being recorded and it gives so much depth to the story.
Replaying the game afterwards made me pause a lot more to appreciate the subtler storylines.
DEFINITELY NOT FOR YOUNG READERS.
Picture from my instagram
  • Umdwyn
!!WARNING!! This book is a prequel to the games, but DO NOT read this book before playing them (Why haven't you played them yet???). It will give away certain "details" that the player should not know about when playing the games. This holds especially true for the first BioShock. I won't mention any of these spoilers in this review, so read on...

I wasn't expecting much when my copy of BioShock:Rapture arrived in the mail, but I consider myself a pretty big fan of the series and the idea of a prequel in print was enough to make me preorder it. I was not disappointed... far from it in fact.

If you've played the BioShock games then you know a great deal of the storytelling is done via audio diaries. These audio diaries are exactly what they sound like... the audio recorded thoughts of those that lived in Rapture. As you progress through the games you discover these recordings scattered about here and there. Each diary contains a small piece of a puzzle; a very dark puzzle that paints a picture of what took place in Rapture. From these diaries we learn of some of the horrible experiences of its citizens, as well as the events that ultimately caused its downfall. John Shirley does an extraordinary job of tying these diaries together into a novel that really fleshes out the story of Rapture.

In bringing these diaries together, Shirley takes side-characters from the games and gives our brief encounters with them more meaning. People that had small cameos from the games are given new life as you see the events that led to their fate in greater detail and from different angles. Not every character is given as much attention as others, but overall I was very satisfied.

I'm a very big BioShock fan so I'll admit that I might have some bias, but I'm trying to look at the book as objectively as I can. As one other reader mentioned, there are many different POVs. I can see where one might feel that some of these don't quite fit when considering the book by itself, as they serve little purpose to move the story along at times and can seem out of place. But for those that experienced the games, these "teasers" that seem unnecessary are actually a prelude for what came afterward. They're more fan-service than anything else; Shirley even dedicated the book itself to the fans of BioShock and BioShock 2. In addition to the spoilers the book contains, this is another reason I strongly suggest reading the book only AFTER you have played the games. These different POVs will be more familiar to you and will likely be more appreciated if you've played the games. That's my opinion anyway.

The only other issue I could see some readers possibly having is that the book definitely doesn't read like your everyday novel... it's choppy and jumps around, taking place over the entire decade that housed the rise and fall of Rapture (430 pages to cover 14 years, actually). I had no problem with this myself; the story was still very easy to follow and flowed well.

Bottom line... this book was a great read and it has me wanting to play through both games all over again! If you are a fan of BioShock then I highly recommend this book.

UPDATE: The BioShock Ultimate Rapture Edition is out! $29.99 gets you both BioShock and BioShock 2, including all their DLCs!
  • Ximathewi
I don't ever get companion novels for video games or similar, but the overwhelmingly positive reviews for this one changed my mind. I picked this up and was surprised at the very high quality of the writing and snappy cover to cover pacing.

For those of you expecting a whole new insight into Rapture - you're not really going to get that here. The most "new" information comes in the first quarter or so of the book as they discuss getting Rapture up off its feet, but once it's up and running there isn't really anything super surprising or revelatory about what goes on. Definitely worth a read for Bioshock fans, and might actually be most interesting to those that haven't played Bioshock before.